Posts

August 06, 2014

+
11:13 PM | Wait before you stamp out your next cigarette! Scientists use cigarette filters in advanced energy storage materials
Who knew smoking was good for the environment! Well, maybe that’s not the right way to put this…rather, if people must smoke (which they undoubtedly will for the foreseeable future), can’t we find something useful to do with all the … Continue reading →

Lee, M., Kim, G., Don Song, H., Park, S. & Yi, J. (2014). Preparation of energy storage material derived from a used cigarette filter for a supercapacitor electrode, Nanotechnology, 25 (34) 345601. DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/25/34/345601

Citation
+
8:15 PM | Researchers to Use Camelina for Biodiesel Production
Camelina sativa, a flowering plant native to Europe and to Central Asia, can be a valuable biofuel crop because it can grow on poorer quality farmland and needs little irrigation and fertilizer.
+
8:02 PM | Lost on the Lake
By Rocky Kistner Tourists flock to the Dominican Republic to savor its crystal white beaches, lush tropical reefs, and meticulously manicured golf courses. But they may not realize that further inland, a climate disaster is growing: an enormous lake is expanding by three feet a year, swallowing whole towns and leaving a farming society with no land left to cultivate. In this short documentary, host Vikram Ghandi takes us on a tour of the devastation caused […]
+
7:00 PM | New Tool Advances Genetic Engineering of Fuel Crops
A powerful new tool that can help advance the genetic engineering of “fuel” crops for clean, green and renewable bioenergy, has been developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), a multi-institutional partnership led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
+
4:07 PM | Oil and Gas Exploration Operations Can Use Brackish Groundwater
According to a new report released by Texas A&M University, oil and gas exploration operations can switch from fresh groundwater of brackish groundwater.
+
3:56 PM | Algae: Friend or Foe?
By Brian Palmer Algae have a lot to offer. They feed the world’s marine life, thicken ice cream, and may provide the key to solving the world’s energy crisis. Algae hold your California roll together. But there’s an algal underworld, too, inhabited by murderous cyanobacteria and backstabbing Prymnesium. Many of these cloak-and-dagger species lurk in our streams and along our shorelines—as 500,000 Ohioans learned the hard way over the […]
+
2:49 PM | The Arctic's Volcano of Garbage Erupts (and Keeps Burning)
By Jason Bittel A landfill in the Canadian town of Iqaluit has been smoldering since at least January “when thermal imaging revealed the then-four-story pile of trash had been burning deep inside like a dragon with indigestion.” Dubbed “Dumpcano,” the landfill has garnered international attention, inspired t-shirts, and of course, spawned its own snarky Twitter account. Dumpcano finally “erupted” on May 20 and has been […]
+
2:28 PM | Method Efficiently Converts Lignocellulosic Biomass Into Biofuel
Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have developed a new method to efficiently convert lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and chemicals.

August 05, 2014

+
7:14 PM | July, 2014: This Month in Energy
Unconventional oil and natural gas extraction techniques are driving a revolution in the traditional energy sector, while solar and wind energy continue to gain market share. One report finds European countries to be the world’s most innovative and another report shows that California leads the U.S. in clean tech for the fifth consecutive year. We have collected all these stories and more of the most important energy news of the past month conveniently in one place for you to read.
+
6:02 PM | Trigeneration System Shows Potential for Off-Grid Applications
A novel trigeneration system fueled by raw plant oils shows significant potential for off-grid applications.
+
4:54 PM | EU Energy Markets Are Yet to Reach Potential
According to the Joint Research Center (JRC), the EU in-house scientific service, both the general energy efficiency market and the energy service markets in the EU have not reached their potential yet.
+
3:06 PM | EIA: Nonhydro Renewables Routinely Surpass Hydropower
April marked the eighth consecutive month that total monthly nonhydro renewable generation in the U.S. exceeded hydropower generation.
+
2:02 PM | Another Royal Birth! (Cheetah-Style)
By Jason Bittel Only about 12,400 cheetahs remain in the wild, thanks to habitat loss, poaching, and a dwindling gene pool. The species' lack of genetic diversity may be contributing to a high mortality rate for cubs, which is why it’s great news that a cheetah named Meg recently gave birth to four healthy little ones at South Africa’s Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre. Double bonus: The quadruplets carry a recessive gene that could bring […]

August 04, 2014

+
8:55 PM | The Reef: A Passionate History
By Osha Gray Davidson Does the world really need another book about the Great Barrier Reef? It already accounts for a small library’s worth of excellent volumes, from coffee table books to natural histories probing its unique ecology. With The Reef: A Passionate History, however, Iain McCalman has produced something important and utterly new: a detailed and engaging account of human interactions with the largest coral reef on the planet. Stretching […]
+
7:52 PM | Chemists Use MRI to Study Supercapacitors
Scientists at New York University and the University of Cambridge have developed a magnetic resonance imaging-based technique for monitoring and potentially enhancing the performance of supercapacitors.
+
6:48 PM | Liquid Alloy Electrode Improves Sodium-Beta Battery Performance
A paper published in Nature Communications (see footnote) describes an electrode made of a liquid metal alloy that enables sodium-beta batteries to operate at significantly lower temperatures.
+
5:46 PM | Does an interdisciplinary focus distort a journal’s IF?
An interesting read about the trajectory of the impact factor (IF) of PLoS ONE: http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2013/06/20/the-rise-and-fall-of-plos-ones-impact-factor-2012-3-730/ There has been a lot of criticism towards the over-reliance on IF as a quantitative metric for researcher evaluation purposes.  This article touches on a … Continue reading →
+
4:57 PM | Low-Grade Cotton Collects 50 Times Its Weight in Oil
Scientists at Texas Tech University have discovered that low-grade cotton made into an absorbent nonwoven mat can collect up to 50 times its own weight in oil.
+
2:34 PM | Toledo Takes Green Smoothie Craze Too Far? (Nah, It's a Pollution Problem)
By Jason Bittel No … Toledo, Ohio, isn’t giving out free kale shakes for breakfast this morning. This glass contains algae-choked water, scooped out of Lake Erie—right in front of the intake crib that brings the city its drinking water. (Dave Zapotosky snapped the pic for the Toledo Blade.) After water tests taken over the weekend revealed high concentrations of toxic microcystin, Governor John Kasich declared a state of emergency on […]
+
2:11 PM | Perovskite Solar Cells Fabricated Using Spray-Painting Process
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have successfully produced perovskite solar cells using a spray-painting process.

August 03, 2014

+
3:33 PM | Ignoring the dangers: fracking development outpacing knowledge of biotic impacts
I’m not uniformly against fracking as many other environmental scientists may be.  Although my initial impressions of fracking were extremely negative, I’ve come to see the need for transitional energy sources as we move away from fossil fuels toward a … Continue reading →

Souther, S., Tingley, M., Popescu, V., Hayman, D., Ryan, M., Graves, T., Hartl, B. & Terrell, K. (2014). Biotic impacts of energy development from shale: research priorities and knowledge gaps, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 12 (6) 330-338. DOI: 10.1890/130324

Citation
1234
111 Results