Posts

January 21, 2015

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5:00 PM | Keeping Memories Fresh by Keeping Glutamate In Check
We are another year older, perhaps a little wiser, and probably more forgetful.  Indeed, making memories is quite a process in the brain: specific synaptic connections are strengthened and new proteins are synthesized.  But as we age, the synapses that make up our memories, such as those in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, start to … Continue reading →

Pereira A.C., Yael S. Grossman, Dani Dumitriu, Rachel Waldman, Sophia K. Jannetty, Katina Calakos, William G. Janssen, Bruce S. McEwen & John H. Morrison (2014). Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111 (52) 18733-18738. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1421285111

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3:11 PM | Wise words from a tree physiologist
Really enjoyed reading the biographies of Dennis Hoagland and William Chander, who collaborated on studies of mineral nutrition of plants. This quote from Chandler is abridged from a speech he gave during the second world war, but it's just as appropriate now.http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/chandler-william-h.pdfhttp://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/hoagland-dennis-r.pdfSee it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching […]
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1:45 PM | Getting on board with a campus common read
As an Earth/space science faculty member, do you struggle to find ways to bring your campus common read in to your STEM courses? Here are some ideas for ways to connect with this campus-wide initiative.
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11:59 AM | On grading strategies.
How do you deal with grading to make it less painful? Talking to a friend who had to grade a lot of exams recently I mentioned a post I had written on how to make grading less painful, only to … Continue reading →
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9:58 AM | ISME J: Exploring functional contexts of symbiotic sustain within lichen-associated bacteria by comparative omics
Symbioses represent a frequent and successful lifestyle on earth and lichens are one of their classic examples. Recently, bacterial communities were identified as stable, specific and structurally integrated partners of the lichen symbiosis, but their role has remained largely elusive in comparison to the well-known functions of the fungal and algal partners. We have explored the metabolic potentials of the microbiome using the lung lichen Lobaria pulmonaria as the model. Metagenomic […]
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9:48 AM | The Plant Cell Reviews Dynamic Aspects of Plant Hormone Signaling and Crosstalk
The Roles of ROS and ABA in Systemic Acquired AcclimationRon Mittler and Eduardo BlumwaldPlant Cell 2015 tpc.114.133090; First Published on January 20, 2015; doi:10.1105/tpc.114.133090 OPENhttp://www.plantcell.org/content/early/2015/01/20/tpc.114.133090.abstract SCFTIR1/AFB-Based Auxin Perception: Mechanism and Role in Plant Growth and DevelopmentMohammad Salehin, Rammyani Bagchi, and Mark EstellePlant Cell 2015 tpc.114.133744; First Published on January 20, 2015; […]
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8:25 AM | India’s Tigers Make Significant Gains As the Country Aims to Help Preserve the Species Worldwide
India is officially home to the world’s largest population of wild tigers. The country gained the title after announcing a major comeback in tiger populations this past Tuesday (January 20). According to the latest census reports, India’s tiger population had grown from 1,706 in 2011 to 2,226 in – roughly a 30% increase. The increase in the tiger population has been heavily credited to India’s tiger conservation and forest management efforts over the […]
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6:57 AM | Remote sensing of soil moisture and plant growth - then and now (fascinating!)
A new satellite will help probe the unknowns about what global warming will do to the planet's fertilitySee it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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6:56 AM | Discover Session Summary: January 20th
Today’s FSL session was a blast! First, we got a tour of the Living Lab just downstairs at Science World, where researchers (many of them students at UBC) conduct psychology experiments and studies. We learned more about a couple of the developmental psychology studies in particular, one investigating how implicit gender stereotypes affect children and […]
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1:20 AM | New Study: Top 1% of Earners Will Have More Wealth Than Bottom 99% By 2016
On Monday, January 19, Oxfam – a respected anti-poverty organization based in Britain – released a report that immediately grabbed the attention of major media outlets. The report’s most alarming claim was a prediction that by 2016, the accumulated wealth of the world’s richest one percent will exceed that of the other 99%. The report was the culmination of a five-year study on global wealth inequality. The share of wealth owned by the top […]

January 20, 2015

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2:00 PM | Some Citizen Science Predictions [Guest Post]
Editor’s Note: This guest post by Chandra Clarke originally appeared on the author’s Citizen Science Center blog. Projects mentioned in this post including Loss of the Night, EteRNA and Sound Around You are all part of SciStarter’s ever growing project database. Find a citizen science project that tickles your fancy using the project finder! I’ve been covering the […]Find more posts like Some Citizen Science Predictions [Guest Post] by Arvind Suresh […]
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1:34 PM | Time To Teach: Supporting Technology for Science Education in Special Education Classrooms
As regular readers of this blog are aware, I am deep proponent of science outreach to the under-served. However, I acknowledge one of the areas that I am weak and that’s in my science outreach... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:00 PM | Enteroviruses as causative agents in type 1 diabetes: loose ends or lost cause?
A recent paper proposes a model which could explain the involvement of CVB as a contributory factor in diabetes. Continue reading →
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12:29 PM | Copper shines in fight against germs
From centuries-old time capsules to modern medical centers, copper shines as the metal of choice to preserve and protect. Case in point:  A time capsule first buried in 1795 by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams was...
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10:53 AM | Ever Wanted To Own Your Very Own Robotic Exoskeleton? (Video)
According to the DailyMail… “A Japanese electronics firm is selling a 13ft (four metre) mechanical suit on Amazon which can be controlled by an iPhone or by stepping inside the device. Dubbed Kuratas, the five-ton, four-wheeled device was the brainchild of inventor Kogora Kurata from Japan’s Kanto region.” The robot/mech suit was designed by Suidobashi Heavy Industry, and can be controlled in two ways: manually, from a small cockpit inside the suit, […]
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9:59 AM | New Phytologist: Meetings - A snapshot of molecular plant–microbe interaction research (2014)
Plants and microbes are in a continuous arms race to maintain their predominance within their particular niche. Understanding the complexity of these plant–microbe interactions is of utmost importance as it can provide new insights into the mechanisms mediating disease processes and in turn inspire new plant breeding strategies. The International Society for Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions (IS-MPMI) invited scientists from around the world to share their findings during the XVI […]

January 19, 2015

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10:53 PM | New Neural Implant Helps Paralyzed Rats Walk Again (Video)
A new technology, known as the e-Dura, has been labeled as “groundbreaking” after successfully giving paralyzed rats the ability to walk. The new technology is flexible and stretchy, allowing it to be implanted directly on the spinal chord with maximum comfort for the patient. The e-Dura also mimics the tissue around the spine (known as dura mater), so the body doesn’t reject the implant’s presence. According to The Telegraph… “It closely imitates […]
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10:25 PM | No Smoke, But Plenty of Fire: How Do E-Cigarettes Affect Oral Health?
E-cigarettes are said to be safer than regular cigarettes since they produce an aerosol instead of smoke. Since nicotine is delivered, there are large oral health implications for users of e-cigarettes. The post No Smoke, But Plenty of Fire: How Do E-Cigarettes Affect Oral Health? appeared first on Ask the Dentist.
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9:45 PM | Putting specs grading to work
The new semester is underway, and with it is the implementation of specifications grading in my two classes. Here is a report from the field about how the system turned out and how it's working so far.
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8:20 PM | Propose or Join a Citizen Science Hackfest Project!
Propose or join a project or activity for the SciStarter Hackfest at the Citizen Science Association Conference! What: A hands-on and discussion-driven meet-up where everyone participates in dreaming up AND building creative tools to improve the field of citizen science! Where: Citizen Science 2015 Conference, San Jose, CA Who: The SciStarter team and YOU! Why: […]Find more posts like Propose or Join a Citizen Science Hackfest Project! by Darlene Cavalier on the SciStarter Blog. Your […]
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5:29 PM | #ReclaimMLK: The Revolutionary and Geek – my thoughts on rejecting sanitized images of Dr. King
The United States national holiday that commemorates the birth of human and civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is always a somber occasion for me. I acknowledge that I am all into... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:12 PM | Hash Out Citizen Science in Twitter Chat Sessions
#CitSciChat Starting this month, you can tune in and take part in monthly discussion sessions about citizen science. The discussions take place on Twitter and anyone is welcome to join with questions, answers, comments, and ideas. You can follow the discussion at the hashtag #CitSciChat. The monthly #CitSciChat are sponsored by SciStarter and The Counter […]Find more posts like Hash Out Citizen Science in Twitter Chat Sessions by Caren Cooper on the SciStarter Blog. Your source for […]
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2:24 PM | How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices?
Librarians may be a teacher's best resource when it comes to implementing inquiry-based teaching strategies. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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12:59 PM | What will the Science Fair Judge ask me??
This time of year, many students are preparing for an actual science fair competition. Most fairs have an interview portion, when the student will explain their project to one or more judges. This will make most students nervous – so the more prepared they are, the better this will probably go. QUICK TIPS: When the … Continue reading »
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11:22 AM | Heat engine – drinking bird
A heat engine. This is my sister’s drinking bird (which I was asked to mention explicitly). If you don’t know how they work, check out the image below or the video. Too lazy to type it out again, it’s explained … Continue reading →
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8:17 AM | Manipulation and Misconduct in the Handling of Image Data (2013 editorial)
New week, new year. What better time to have a lab / course / departmental conversation about what is and isn't permitted in data handling? This 2013 editorial by Mike Blatt and Cathie Martin is a good place to start, and includes some additional useful references.See it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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5:50 AM | Summary Jan-15
Planning is an important part of any project. This session was full of it, after a quick presentation the combine forces of the engineers and researchers starting discussing idea of how to make a better, faster boat than the Tinkerine version. The groups were faced with four challenges: 1) actually floating in still water (a […]
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5:26 AM | The Universality of Facial Expressions: Do You See What I See?
After looking at a quick overview of my past science communication posts, I’ve written about some scientific topics ranging from biology/public health (the West African Ebola epidemic, GMO foods), astronomy (comets), technology (electricity-generating shoes, a guide to circuits) and ecology/environmental science (impending extinction of certain species). However, I realize that I’ve barely written at all […]
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4:06 AM | Why I’m Not a Time Traveller…
(Image from here, licensed under  “Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Germany“) Well, there’s of course the obvious fact that it isn’t remotely possible with today’s technology. But even if some of my more crazy, mad scientist-isque colleagues (cough.. cough… Jesse, Parker) were to one day build a time machine, I would be the first to nope out of climbing into […]

January 18, 2015

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11:32 PM | Mars Probe Is Found After Crash Landing Over 10 Years Ago
A lost probe that was sent to Mars by the United Kingdom back in 2003 has just been found by a NASA spacecraft monitoring the Red Planet’s surface. According to Space.com… “The spacecraft, which hitched a ride to Mars on the European Space Agency’s Mars Express mission, had not been heard from since it detached from that spacecraft on Dec. 19, 2003. Beagle 2 was supposed to land on Mars six days later, on Dec. 25. But when the lander never
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