Posts

July 12, 2014

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4:08 PM | Why Were These Cars Abandoned In the Forests of Belgium for 70 Years? (Photo Gallery)
In the forests near Chatillon, a small village in southern Belgium, lie between 100-150 dilapidated and decaying cars. During World War II, a number of American troops were stationed in Chatillon. Urban legends claim that when the war ended, the troops being sent home didn’t have the money to ship their vehicles back with them, so […]
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12:57 AM | 80% of All Your Phone Calls Are Being Recorded and Stored
The NSA’s image took a major hit when Edward Snowden revealed to the world the vast scope of their surveillance programs. The scandal centered around the NSA’s collection of “metadata”, which includes things like when and where calls or texts are coming from, as well as other passive information like where in a computer network certain data […]
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12:21 AM | Washington Post: Scientists turn to public to help pay for research
In over three decades of studying ferns, Duke University professor Kathleen Pryer has received her share of grant money. But for her newest project, she’s getting help from a retired nurse in Canada and a 17-year-old in Arkansas.Mary Williams's insight:Remember that Azolla genome crowd-funding idea we shared a while ago? It got funded! Read more here.See it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)

July 11, 2014

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11:21 PM | How These All-Female Lizards Are Able to Reproduce and Thrive Without the Help of Any Males
As far back as the 1960s, scientists were aware that a number of whiptail lizards in Mexico and the southwestern United States were made up entirely of females. The most notable of these species, the New Mexico whiptail lizard, is able to reproduce healthy, well-bred offspring without the aid of male fertilization. Whiptails aren’t the only species that […]
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6:32 PM | Israel’s Government Is Paying College Students to Spread Pro-Israel Propaganda on Social Media
A lot of the discussion and debate about the current Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been taking place on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media sources. In light of that, I think it’s important for people to know that social media is by no means immune to government propaganda. Far from it in fact. Back in August […]
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5:32 PM | iLabs: Question of the Day
So for a Friday, we’ll leave you with a picture, and the question posed in it! Come check us out to find out more, or stay tuned for the answer next week. :)  Happy Weekend!
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3:23 PM | Let’s Move! How Body Movements Drive Learning Through Technology
Work in the field shows promising signs that incorporating bodily movements—even subtle ones—can improve the learning that’s done on computers. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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3:00 PM | Seeing Is (Not Always) Believing!
Visual illusions and other optical puzzles are fun for families to share and explore. With hands-on science projects and activities, families can create and test their own visual illusions. For more advanced exploration, a new electronics science project guides students in creating a mesmerizing infinity mirror that invites viewers to gaze into a seemingly infinite tunnel lit by a series of lights.
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2:25 PM | The Week's Top Science Communication Stories (7.12.14)
This week I found some great stories that explored academic storytelling, accessing science comm....
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12:01 PM | Are you prepared for practical chemistry in the new A-level 2015 specifications? - Learn ...
The new draft A-level chemistry specifications have recently been published and there have been substantial changes to the contribution and assessment of practical work.   In the case of AQA, a separate endorsement of practical work will be awarded to candidates and written papers will assess the knowledge, understanding and skills exemplified by 12 key practical areas. (See http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/specifications/AQA-7405-SP-2015.PDF)   The OCR specification […]
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8:21 AM | Mosquitoes infected Wolbachia more likely to transmit West Nile virus
Mosquitoes infected with the bacteria Wolbachia are more likely to become infected with West Nile virus and to transmit the virus to humans. The post Mosquitoes infected Wolbachia more likely to transmit West Nile virus appeared first on MicrobiologyBytes.
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4:20 AM | Milestones in Plant Science - add your suggestions to the developing timeline hosted by ASPB
What are the big events that shaped our understanding of plants? This site is starting to collect major milestones in the discipline, but needs your help. Send in your suggestion!See it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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1:46 AM | Buzz Aldrin’s New Campaign Aims to Build Awareness About The Apollo 11 Mission (Video and Photo Gallery)
The second man to ever step on the Moon, Buzz Aldrin, is endorsing a new project that’s being called “Apollo 45″. The campaign aims to increase awareness about all Apollo missions and Apollo 11′s historic lunar landing. The 45th anniversary of that monumental landing is this month (July 26). Aldrin feels that, “We need to remind the world […]

July 10, 2014

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11:45 PM | The Quickest Possible Explanation of the Current Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
For all of the coverage of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, it’s come to my attention that very few people actually understand what’s going on there. This is by no means a complete history- it’s “the quickest possible explanation”. So if you think I’m missing an important piece of information, please don’t attack me, just add it to […]
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7:50 PM | India Continues to Lead the Solar Industry By Building A Huge Floating Solar Power Plant
India has been at the forefront of the solar industry for the past few years now. They are currently in the process of building by far the world’s largest solar power plant, and newly elected Prime Minister Norendra Modi has announced a plan to bring electricity to every home by 2017, using solar power. Now, India […]
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7:14 PM | Treasures from the Deep
By Stephanie Schuttler Stephanie is a postdoctoral research associate at North Carolina State University and NC Museum of Natural Sciences in the Biodiversity Lab of the Nature Research Center. She is working with middle school teachers in the Students Discover program to incorporate eMammal, a citizen science camera trap study, into their classrooms.  Learn more about her at http://stephanieschuttler.weebly.com/. I […]
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4:00 PM | Now Available in Trichromatic Color!
“What is color?” What a good question! The answer is a bit tricky, but it starts with light. Color is the visual perception of different wavelengths of light reflecting off objects, which is the subjective experience of something much more omnipresent: the electromagnetic spectrum. Dun, dun, dun! “RAZ! This is supposed to be about neuroscience! … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Marinade Science: Weekly Science Activity
School and family science weekly spotlight: the science of marinades
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2:54 PM | From Mars to Minecraft: Teachers Bring the Arcade to the Classroom
Teachers have found many different ways of using digital games in the classroom. But what kind of games are these students playing? And how are teachers incorporating them in the classroom? [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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1:00 PM | Does Tech Upgrade Art?
Art has had an interesting relationship with technology over the years.  Technological advances such as paintbrushes, the printing press, and computers have opened up new ways for artists to express themselves.  However, I want to emphasize that "new" does not always mean "better". There's a reason that people still gather in ancient museums to see artwork that has stood the test of time. A great example of the relationship between art and tech is Digital Revolution, an art show […]
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10:49 AM | Science Communication Manifesto?
The other day Plain Language Science staff put together a kind of (hotly contested) science communication manifesto revolving around the concept of incommensurability – the fact that, on the one hand, all science communication, and all scientific activity as such, always … Continue reading → The post Science Communication Manifesto? appeared first on Plain Language Science.
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10:49 AM | Science Communication Manifesto
The other day Plain Language Science staff put together a kind of science communication manifesto revolving around the concept of incommensurability – the fact that, on the one hand, all science communication, and all scientific activity as such, always occurs within … Continue reading → The post Science Communication Manifesto appeared first on Plain Language Science.
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7:42 AM | Promoting our Discipline with Geology Selfies – from Mauna Loa to Mars
We like posting photos online, especially if we have a happy moment to share.  A recent study shows that photo posts on Twitter and Instagram are four times more likely to convey positive sentiment compared with text-only tweets (see The Wall Street Journal article by Wells, 2014).  And what could make us more happy than taking photos of ourselves and immediately sharing what we are up to? Welcome to the …
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1:44 AM | Why Students Chose to Shock Themselves Rather Than Sit Alone With Their Thoughts
We live in a world saturated with sensory stimulations. From our cell phones to our laptops and TVs, almost our entire day is a marathon of sights and sounds, all competing for our increasingly short attention spans. So you would think most people would enjoy the opportunity to get away from it all and gather their […]

July 09, 2014

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6:47 PM | What the Brazil vs. Germany Game Looked Like On Twitter (Interactive Map)
After Brazil was destroyed by Germany in the first World Cup semi-final yesterday, Twitter announced that the match was the most discussed game ever on Twitter, generating 35.6 million tweets. Twitter than collaborated with the interactive map developers at cartodb.com to create an amazing map which shows the mentions of Brazil and Germany on Twitter as the game went along. […]
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5:26 PM | This Is What An Erupting Volcano Looks Like from the Space Station (GIF)
On June 12, 2009, the International Space Station’s orbit happened to take it over the Kuril Islands (northeast Japan). The Kuril Islands were built by volcanic activity and still have active volcanoes. The most active is Sarychev Peak, located on the northwestern end of Matua Island. Although Sarychev Peak hadn’t erupted since 1989, it was somewhat overdue […]
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4:00 PM | Making a Game of City Planning: Students Explore Civil Engineering
Many popular video games involve aspects of city planning. Whether nurturing a small village or populating and running a sprawling city, kids can experiment with city planning on a variety of levels, from ensuring available resources to strategically positioning city protection. A fun SimCity science project from Science Buddies helps turn in-game city planning into a science experiment, one students can also use to enter the annual Future City competition.
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3:42 PM | iLabs: ‘Catch-of-the-Day’ — Ostracods!
Today one of our staff members is going to share about a new activity visitors can take part in with our research microscope: Catch-of-the-Day! Blog post by Micro World iLab Staff Member, Nancy Locquet In the Micro World Investigate Lab, we take good care of different kinds of microscopic pond life. How do we do […]
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3:34 PM | Mosaic vs chimera
Both terms refer to one organism with two or more distinct populations of cells * – but they are not interchangeable. The different cell lines in chimeras originally come from different zygotes whereas mosaics arise from the same zygote. Because mosaics start with the same genome, you expect them to be more similar than chimeras […]
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3:30 PM | A School That Ditches All the Rules, But Not the Rigor
How can we make school a joyful experience without sacrificing rigor? What's the best way to measure true learning? What's the purpose of school? The founders and teachers at the PlayMaker School, an... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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