Posts

August 23, 2014

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10:31 PM | Pamela Anderson to ALS Association: Stop Animal Testing
Originally posted on Life or Lunch?:Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of weeks, odds are you’ve heard about the Ice Bucket Challenge. People from all walks of life have joined in, but Pamela Anderson has voiced…
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7:02 PM | Greetings from Portland, OR
I’m currently visiting the Greatest City on Earth which is interfering with my science blogging. But here is some personal photoblogging. (to be updated, if anyone cares)
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6:52 PM | Why Animal Rights?
“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. Many of us bought our beloved “pets” at pet shops, had guinea pigs, and kept beautiful birds in cages. We wore wool and silk, … Continue reading →
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10:44 AM | True Facts About Marsupials | @GrrlScientist
A snarky caturday video by ZeFrank, who spoofs Morgan Freeman talking about Australias marsupials Just in time for Caturday! Fans of the talented Morgan Freeman, the witty ZeFrank and of course, all of the worlds amazing animals, can indulge all three passions at the same time in this delightful, and somewhat irreverent, video that shares (some) facts about (some) Australian marsupials. Continue reading...
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9:39 AM | True facts about anglerfish
SUMMARY: To the female anglerfish, the human male is a very loud, annoying and unnecessarily complicated pair of gonads. Antennarius commerson (Latreille), 111 mm SL, UW 20983. Photograph: D. B. Grobecker [doi:10.1186/1471-2148-10-58] Caturday has arrived once again, so it is time to watch some animals doing stuff! Today's caturday animal is the anglerfish, an ancient taxonomic order of bony fishes that arose sometime between 100 and 130 million years ago. (In contrast, humans are mere […]
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3:39 AM | How Wearable Technology Is Helping Save Rhinos from Poachers
Originally posted on Wolf Is My Soul:ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY Conservationists in South Africa are using computerized bracelets powered by Intel Galileo technology to help regenerate the critically endangered rhino population. Thin and light he is not. An adult male black…
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2:57 AM | Marine Protected Areas Might Not Be Enough to Help Overfished Reefs Recover
Originally posted on SAVES Club:Young corals, fish turned off by smell of damaged habitats Humans standing on coral reef Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.…
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2:21 AM | Your Land is Fracked: The Untold Story of Drilling on Our Public Lands
Originally posted on ClimateWest:Note: Tim Ream is WildEarth Guardians’ new Climate and Energy Campaign Director. He’ll be joining me in blogging here from time to time.  Enjoy his first post!  — Jeremy Nichols I’ve spent a whole lot of days…

August 22, 2014

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9:27 PM | Massachusetts advocates optimistic about paid sick leave ballot: ‘We need public policies that lift people up and keep families healthy’
After nearly a decade of hoping state legislators would pass an earned paid sick time law, advocates in Massachusetts decided it was time to put the question to voters. Now, in November, voters will have the chance to help improve the lives of nearly 1 million workers who can’t earn one, single hour of sick leave and are often left to choose between caring for themselves or a loved one, paying the bills or losing a job.
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1:00 PM | What we’re reading: Genetic diversity and life history, evolutionary rescue, and scientists on social media
In the journals Romiguier, J., P. Gayral, M. Ballenghien, A. Bernard, V. Cahais, A. Chenuil, Y. Chiari, R. Dernat, L. Duret, N. Faivre, E. Loire, J. M. Lourenco, B. Nabholz, C. Roux, G. Tsagkogeorga, A. A.-T. Weber, L. A. Weinert, … Continue reading →
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12:43 PM | Before They Were Scientists: Michelle Wcisel
In the swing of Shark Week, I was able to virtually sit down with white shark researcher, Michelle Wcisel. As we talk, I notice a “Smarty Pants” mug full of pens resting on top of a dresser and a sticker-covered door peeks over her shoulder. Books line the walls behind her head and there is a sense of nostalgia all around her – it was as if she was sitting in everyone’s den recounting her middle school life from the very place it happened. It was wonderful to discuss the […]
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (August 22nd, 2014)
The waters off of NYC are full of whales and sharks. Here, a Humpback whale breaches in front of the NY skyline. Great read on how wildlife hybrids are becoming more common as our natural landscapes change. Sweden mourns the death of its oldest eel. Entire new town planned for construction in Florida Panther habitat. Scientists suggest ending trophy fishing of threatened
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11:30 AM | Flump – Frozen microbial ecosystems, Primary forests, meta-analysis of genetic diversity studies, maps
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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11:15 AM | Friday links: text mining the ESA meeting, the rise and decline of the US (Forest Service), and more
Also this week: Shark Week jumps the shark, salmon cannon (really?!), depressing data on the gender gap in tenure decisions (in some fields), no we shouldn’t shut down all comment sections, and more. Oh, and Google Maps vs. the Proclaimers. … Continue reading →
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8:00 AM | Information Aversion
  Why do ostriches stick their heads under the sand when they’re scared? They don’t. So why do people say they do? A Roman named Pliny the Elder might be partially to blame. He wrote that ostriches “imagine, when they have thrust their head and neck into a bush, that the whole of their body […]
Editor's Pick

August 21, 2014

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7:36 PM | These lizards may be able to learn from each other
Wild ThingsAnimals by Sarah Zielinski 8:16am, August 22, 2014 An experiment found evidence of social learning among eastern water skinks, a long-lived species from Australia.Toby Hudson/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)PRINCETON, N.J. — Learning can be a quick shortcut for figuring out how to do something on your own. The ability to learn from watching another individual — called […]
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6:35 PM | The first scientist…or natural philosopher
Nature has a review of a book on Aristotle: Aristotle is considered by many to be the first scientist, although the term postdates him by more than two millennia. In Greece in the fourth century BC, he pioneered the techniques … Continue reading →
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6:08 PM | Photo of the Week – August 21, 2014
I’ve written before about how many times I often snap the shutter on my camera to make sure I get the photo I want.  Digital photography makes that a cheap insurance option and gives me lots of images to choose from … Continue reading →
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6:04 PM | Liberian ebola rate jumps
Many reports from on-the-ground workers with the WHO, Doctors Without Borders, state health and aid agencies, etc. have commented that the case and death rates in at least some locations have almost certainly been too low, because of a substantial … Continue reading →
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5:24 PM | Scientific conferences, the too-slow movement of ideas, and giving an engaging talk
I went to a bunch of scientific conferences this summer. Four of ‘em. I have a smorgasbord of reflections on the whole experience to share with you. I spent about fifteen days padding around convention centers this summer. In early June there was Goldschmidt in Sacramento, then in July were both Social Insects and then Tropical Biology in…
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3:45 PM | Step one
The hardest part about gaining any new idea is sweeping out the false idea occupying that niche. As long as that niche is occupied, evidence and proof and logical demonstration get nowhere. But once the niche is emptied of the … Continue reading →
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12:37 PM | Workshop held on future of Invasive Species Compendium
Originally posted on CABI Invasives Blog:Members of the Invasive Species Consortium from the US, Mexico, Caribbean and South Pacific met in Washington DC on 4 August and unanimously agreed to keep the Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) an open access resource for a further five years. The ISC has been resourced by a diverse international…
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11:53 AM | Is blogging with someone a conflict of interest?
Most journals and granting agencies have conflict of interest policies, though in ecology and evolution they’re often fairly non-specific, so that in practice much is left to the discretion of people with decision-making authority. For instance, the Journal of Ecology … Continue reading →
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1:02 AM | Museum work and another post
I've just returned to Fayetteville after a week spent in Raleigh, North Carolina at the Museum of Natural Sciences Research Lab. I was there working with Rowland Shelley, one of the world experts on millipedes. I made a similar trip last fall--a whirlwind of looking at as many millipede specimens as I could to get acquainted with the North American diversity. This trip was more focused, but still as intense as last fall.Despite sitting in front of a microscope for what was easily over 30 hours, […]

August 20, 2014

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10:10 PM | Become an SfN official blogger! #sfn14
The annual Neuroscience meeting (SfN) is coming up soon and SfN has announced that they are once again seeking official bloggers: Social media allows for the widespread sharing of scientific information and increased interaction with colleagues. Twitter, Facebook, and personal … Continue reading →
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10:00 PM | Lessons from Megijima: What Can the Loss of Culture Teach Us About Urban Nature?
In terms of physical implementation, we have an endless stream of good knowledge, theory, and practice for building sustainable, nature-inclusive cities; a collection reaching back for well over a century. What’s missing, I would argue, are not methods and knowledge, … Continue reading →
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9:47 PM | New herbicide and GE seeds: EPA and USDA poised to approve herbicide with insufficiently unexamined cumulative and long-term health effects
If the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) give their approval to a new herbicide called Enlist Duo and to corn and soybean seeds genetically engineered (GE) to resist that chemical, the United States could see a significant increase in what is already one of the country’s most widely used herbicides.…
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7:28 PM | Announcing the NeuroRumblr: Crowd-sourcing information in neuroscience
When it comes to providing information about jobs, Neuroscience is behind the times. Other fields have systems set up to allow faculty applicants to share information with each other about the job market. Economics has econjobrumors while ecology has this awesome … Continue reading →
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4:44 PM | International Book Award for Corr Syl
Corr Syl, the youngest warrior in Wycliff District, is a battle rabbit who must deal with an invasion by a neighboring species. Together with Rhya Bright another young battle rabbit, Corr tries to find a solution that will not ignite a broader conflict. Continue reading →
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4:30 PM | Climate change and the fate of New Zealand’s forests
By storing carbon in wood, forests currently play a key role in mitigating climate change. However, there is growing concern that as climate changes forests could shift from being a net carbon sink to a source. In our recent paper published in Global Change Biology we explore the consequences of climate change on wood production in […]
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