Posts

November 21, 2014

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1:37 AM | China’s New Great Wall Threatens One Quarter of World’s Shorebirds
In a society now relentlessly focused on short-term profit that seems like a wonderful bargain, and the collateral loss of vast areas of shorebird habitat merely an incidental detail. Continue reading →

November 20, 2014

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10:51 PM | Scientists’ tags on fish may be leading seals to lunch
Wild ThingsAnimals,Ecology,Oceans by Sarah Zielinski 5:53pm, November 20, 2014 Janice is one of 10 grey seals that learned the sound of a pinging tag would lead to food.© Amanda Stansbury, University of St AndrewsTo study fish or invertebrates in the sea, scientists often mark individual animals with acoustic tags that make soft, ultrasonic pinging noises. The marked swimmer can’t […]
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8:55 PM | Photo of the Week – November 20, 2014
It’s been a cold week, though we’re finally starting to warm up again.  As a way to feel a little less chilly, I went back through some photos from the summer and found these three shots from late August.  All … Continue reading →
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8:52 PM | What is it like in a day of a wildlife biologist?
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8:45 PM | Fatal work injury that killed Juan Carlos Reyes was preventable, OSHA cites Angel’s AAA
The fatal work-related injuries that killed Juan Carlos Reyes' could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.
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2:00 PM | #EntSoc14, a quick review
I have had a wonderful time at my first big bug conference – the annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America, at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland. Amid secretive (or not so secretive) break-out sessions to Voodoo Doughnuts, … Continue reading →
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1:08 PM | Meet the lab: Sarah Loboda
This is the second in a series of posts that will introduce the members of the arthropod ecology lab. This one is about Sarah Loboda: I am not one of those people who can reflect back on my childhood with memories of chasing butterflies with a net. Instead, I could be found shouting loudly when […]
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11:00 AM | So you're not a programmer. Are you sure?
In a recent lab meeting, we had a discussion about some good practices in programming – unit testing, defensive programming, coverage analysis, all that. For most of my undergrad, a substantial part of my master, and some of my PhD, I have been running experiments, either in lab classes or for actual research. My undergrad in particular was in cell biology and genetics. The experiments in this field are only as good as the controls: a smaller experiment, or additional condition, that you […]
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3:11 AM | Holiday Gravy
Vegetarian gravy for tofu turkey. Continue reading →
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12:30 AM | Congress and science: White House threatens to veto bills that would change EPA science advisory boards and limit EPA use of science
In action that may portend how the 114th Congress will treat science, the House has passed two bills that would limit the EPA's use of science. The White House is threatening to veto both – and an additional bill that in the White House's view could weaken the Clean Air Act's public health and environmental protections.

November 19, 2014

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11:20 PM | ESA Policy News November 19: US, China reach emissions agreement, NSF ‘Truthy’ study scrutinized, House committee chairs named for 2015
Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
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11:17 PM | Transient temperature change estimation under varying radiative forcing change scenarios, part two
Continuing from part one, this post looks at a specific method for estimating TCS (transient climate sensitivity), for any desired year and/or radiative forcing scenario, as predicted by any AOGCM climate model. And some associated topics. The basic idea was … Continue reading →
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10:31 PM | Plans for the Afterward
I'm studying for my qualifying exams right now, and I think I'm firmly in the "What if I FAIL?" phase.  I really don't think I'll fail.  But, WHAT IF?!!  In either case, I'll know in about two weeks.  In the afterglow of my success or in the I-don't-give-a-crap phase before deciding on my new career path, I plan to have two days of full on relaxation.  Hint, if you come to this blog to hear about actual science things, then now is the time to bow out of this post. […]
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9:12 PM | Funny Talking Animals Video
Meet a hungry bear who hates spinach, watch a snow leopard tickle fight, sing along at animal bathtime and find out why two penguins are arguing about pizza in this funny talking animals video.
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7:47 PM | New faces: Karen James
Recently we’ve been pleased to welcome a big group of new contributors to the blog. By way of introduction, I asked each of them to answer a few quick questions about him- or herself. —Jeremy Who are you? Where are … Continue reading →
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6:35 PM | Transient temperature change estimation under varying radiative forcing change scenarios, part one
The estimation of transient climate sensitivity (TCS, defined below) has been in the back of my mind since writing a couple of posts a couple of months ago (here and here) on expected future global mean temperatures over this century. … Continue reading →
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3:00 PM | Keeping Perspective
We are at that point in the semester where many students are incredibly anxious about their performance in courses. This is especially true for first year undergraduate students. One aspect of teaching Intro Bio in the fall semester is trying … Continue reading →
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2:39 PM | Update: Plant Health News (19 Nov 14)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including the insect-resistant maize that could increase yields and decrease pesticide use in Mexico, nematodes that are threatening rice in the Ayeyarwady Region of Myanmar and a study into how salt-loving plants could contribute to sustainable global food production. Click on the link to […]
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2:15 PM | Growing the evolutionary relationship between green algae and salamanders
The presence of  green algae within the developing egg masses of amphibians has been recognized since the early 1900s, but only recently have researchers discovered that the these algae (termed “Oophila”) persist in animal tissues far after leaving the egg. The … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Academic dress code or why women seem to think about clothing more than men
Last week we saw a blatant example of not considering the implications of your wardrobe. There are a lot of good perspectives on That Shirt worn by Dr. Matt Taylor not the least Terry’s own last week; on twitter #shirtstorm or #shirtgate. Rather than discuss the incident itself, which has received plenty of play already…
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12:56 PM | 3-year PostDoc Position on Connecting Forest Models, Data and Diversity Effects in Freiburg
We still seek applicants for a 3-yr PostDoc project that combines process-based forest models, Bayesian parameter estimation and ecologically the question of what processes cause diversity effects in temperate forests. A pdf with details of the call can be downloaded here. The position is available immediately. A first consideration of incoming applications will take place…
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9:26 AM | EU Evaluation finds Plantwise ‘highly relevant and timely’
“The Plantwise programme is a highly relevant and timely initiative considering the high percentage of crops lost to pest and disease problems, the impact these problems have on especially small farmer livelihoods, and the probability that in the future plant health problems will be enhanced by climate change and globalization.”  Download and read the Final […]
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1:22 AM | Occupational Health News Roundup
New report chronicles the low wages of child care workers; Johns Hopkins black lung review still unfinished; California nurses go on strike; and OSHA calls on retailers to protect their workers during Black Friday.

November 18, 2014

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9:10 PM | 45 Things I’ve Learned about Science Since I was a Student
Editor’s note: At Your Wild Life we like to do public science, science in which we open the process of scientific discovery so that you can be a part of it. Sometimes that means citizen science. Other times it means science as art. And then there is today — today we are sharing with you Rob’s thoughts about some of the things no one tells you about being a faculty member, a scholar at a university. Maybe there are some insights in here about broader life, but certainly this […]
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6:59 PM | Tasty animals end up on latest list of threatened species
Wild ThingsConservation,Animals,Oceans by Sarah Zielinski 1:59pm, November 18, 2014 Frozen bluefin tuna are stacked before an auction at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. The fish, coveted for sushi and sashimi, are now on the decline, and the IUCN has just changed their designation to “Vulnerable,” indicating that they are threatened with extinction.Stewart Butterfield/Flickr (CC […]
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4:40 PM | Building Ecological Services: Restoring the Ecosystem Services of the Habitats We Are Replacing with Human Development
Every year, new scientific advances indicate life is more interwoven than we ever imagined. From recent reports that reveal the cascading effects of wolves’ reintroduction to Wyoming to current studies that track the dire impact of Washington dams on the … Continue reading →
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2:28 PM | Making Smart Assumptions about Prairie Management
Some people say it’s dangerous to make assumptions.  I disagree.  In fact, assumptions are both necessary and empowering.  Land managers make assumptions all the time.  If we didn’t, we’d never get anything done. Assumptions are only dangerous when they are … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Why Conservation? Communicating Applied Biodiversity Science
You might have a favorite science writer. Mine are David Quammen, Bill Bryson, Carl Sagan, and Tim Flannery. Others may . . .
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11:00 AM | From cats to rats: two studies on domestication and tameness
Anyone who has ever read Charles Darwin is acutely aware of his fascination with domestication – particularly how he fancied fancy pigeons. Darwin drew on his domestication obsession while writing his book, The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, … Continue reading →

November 17, 2014

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10:42 PM | Navel-gazing Newsflash
A few quick updates on Belly Button Biodiversity and related projects: Azeen Ghorayhshi recently wrote a short bit for Wired Magazine UK recently about Belly Button Biodiversity. You can now download and take a gander at the second and final batch of data from Belly Button Biodiversity. The available file contains both taxonomic information (OTU tables) and meta-data self-reported from our last batch of participants. These are the same data we used to generate the interactive pie chart. In late […]
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