Posts

October 24, 2014

+
2:20 PM | Before They Were Scientists: Randy Woodson
When I learned that North Carolina State University had a scientist as our Chancellor I made it my personal goal to tell his middle school story. Finally, after a year of conducting Before They Were Scientists interviews, I had my chance. I recently sat down with Chancellor Randy Woodson in his office overlooking the iconic NCSU Bell Tower. He started our conversation by opening a three-ring-binder and flipping through the exhaustive list of questions I had sent the week before to help him […]
+
1:00 PM | What we’re reading: The color of cichlids, projected genomes, and simplifying NSF proposals
In the journals Albertson RC, KE Powder, Y Hu, KP Coyle, RB Roberts, and KJ Parsons. 2014. Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes. Molecular Ecology, 23: 5135–5150. doi: 10.1111/mec.12900. … … Continue reading →
+
12:00 PM | Recommended reads #38
Ecologist Timothée Poisot has what I think is a remarkable insight about the myth/cult/phenomenon of busy in academia. This is one of those topics that causes people to people spill lots of neurons and ink, often recycling a lot of the same notions. But this one is different and worth your time. Anthropologist Holly Dunsworth recently…
+
11:43 AM | Friday links: what significant results look like, optimal journal submission strategy, and more
Also this week: how to schedule a grad student committee meeting, PlanetPopNet, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, computer science vs. women, the Canadian government vs. its own scientists, and more. From Meg: This piece on how to schedule a committee … Continue reading →
+
9:00 AM | Invasive seaweed shelters tiny native critters on Georgia mudflats
On the tidal mudflats of Georgia and South Carolina, th […]
+
8:31 AM | Terror Hits at Marina Bay this weekend!
If you have watched “Real Steel”, you probably can remember scenes of giant robots fighting it out at live combats. From today until 26 October, you can see something along the same line too, though maybe not quite the same scale as in the movie. Robots Live! (from UK) showcases robots which weigh about 100… Continue reading »
+
7:27 AM | Still in McMurdo
Weather has not been too kind to us this field season.  We were supposed to leave McMurdo for Lake Joyce this past Wednesday, and our most recent estimate for departure is Monday.  This may not seem like too much time, but it is already over 10% of our total planned time out at Lake Joyce.Mostly, the issues come from wind and blowing snow.  Weather conditions at McMurdo are categorized into three conditions based on wind speed, wind chill, and visibility:Condition indicator on […]

October 23, 2014

+
11:01 PM | Bird Feeders
It’s coming up to winter so people will be conscious that our garden birds need a helping hand to get through the cold months. Bird feeders will be stocked, bread served up and water dished out. In the UK alone, almost half of households provide supplementary food for birds throughout the year. And although songbirds are usually the species that come to mind when we think of provisioning food the same principle can apply to more exotic birds, notably vultures. Indeed conservationists have […]
+
9:34 PM | Destructive trends in workers’ compensation
Decades of business-friendly "reforms" to workers' compensation make the bargain between employers and labor no longer a good deal for injured workers.
+
7:59 PM | Photo of the Week – October 23, 2014
I needed a walk in the prairie the other evening.  There are times when I just need to change focus and think about something besides my own life, and hiking through a grassland is the perfect tonic. Our family prairie … Continue reading →
+
4:59 PM | Boots on the ground for NEON Member Institution Representatives
NEON Member Institution representatives learned about NEON data collection first-hand this week during a visit the Central Plains Experimental Range (CPER), the Domain 10 core site. This site tour was part of the 2014 NEON Membership Meeting, held October 21-22 in Boulder, CO at NEON Headquarters. A group of 20 participants toured the CPER site … Continue reading »
+
3:55 PM | Southern birds may be moving into your winter backyard
Wild ThingsAnimals,Ecology,Climate by Sarah Zielinski 12:47pm, October 23, 2014 Some warm-adapted species of birds, such as cardinals, have become increasingly common in the northeastern United States in recent decades.Ryan and Sarah Deeds/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)To get a good look at the effects of climate change, look no further than your own backyard: There might be some unexpected birds among […]
+
11:39 AM | What if NSF preproposals WERE the proposals?
I just finished my NSERC grant (hooray!), so thought I’d fire off a quick post with some thoughts on the difference between NSERC grants and NSF grants. At the end, there’s a radical suggestion for NSF grants: do away with … Continue reading →
+
9:00 AM | Old forests store new nitrogen–and may soak up nutrient excesses
Ecologists working in central Pennsylvania forests have […]

October 22, 2014

+
9:48 PM | ESA Policy News October 22: White House focuses on climate resiliency, NSF accepting Ebola research proposals, enviros sue to protect Wolverine
Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
+
6:29 PM | Statewide Pesticide Use–California Draft Environmental Impact Report
Throughout the report, the Department fails to consider recommending changing crops and practices to avoid pest impacts. Of course, we might have passed the point where we can feed our growing population without pesticides. In this case, we can look forward to a time of forced population decline. Continue reading →
+
3:53 PM | Readers Write In: Mystery Snake #1 is eating Mystery Snake #2!
Here are some recent snake identification requests I've received. Please see below for our snake ID post ground rules! Good morning,We found the snake shown on the attached picture in front of our house.Roberto L.Cooper City, Florida Good morning David, Here are some shots of 2 snakes, one dying, one very much alive. (no human intervention involved). I think I know what the live one
+
12:00 PM | Conference report: SACNAS
Here is a detailed report on my brief experience with the SACNAS meeting, aggregated as an unordered set of observations and thoughts. Just a short while ago, I was wondering whether my students are better served attending a disciplinary meeting, or a minority-focused conference. I was given the opportunity by SACNAS to see for myself.…
+
11:43 AM | Elliot Sober on the present and future of philosophy of biology
Back in Sept. I was fortunate to be able to attend a philosophy of science “summit” at the University of Calgary, with talks by a bunch of the world’s top philosophers of science. I thought I’d share my notes from … Continue reading →
+
10:47 AM | Update: Plant Health News (22 Oct 14)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including a study on the use of predator beetles as biocontrol for the destructive coffee berry borer, a look at the role of Ethiopia’s seedbanks in food security and turning barren land into banana orchards in Bangladesh. Click on the link to read […]
+
8:08 AM | Are you Shutting Up and Writing?
Inspired by the awesome blog, the Thesis Whisperer and under the constant reminder that we must publish or perish, post docs from the School of Natural Sciences have been meeting on a weekly basis, on and off for the past year to sit down, shut up and write. Here is a bit of background on the Shut Up and Write ‘movement’, a little bit of what we’ve learned along the way and a big invite to any post grads, post docs and PIs in TCD’s School of Natural Sciences to come […]
+
4:52 AM | Snails don’t jump in acidic oceans
Originally posted on Torch:[©CSIRO Publishing. This article first appeared in The Helix Issue 155, a science magazine for children produced by CSIRO.] Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus (Gastropoda: Strombidae). Also known as jumping snails. YES, these snails have colorful eyes. [photo: Sue-Ann Watson] ? A sea snail, grazing on algae among the corals, smells a predatory…
+
2:47 AM | And the winner is…
I have just returned from the New England Estuarine Research Society meeting in Groton, Connecticut (don’t be jealous). One of my students, Bethany Williams, gave a talk on the coffee-bean snail, Melampus bidentatus, and the effect of sea-level rise. I don’t want to give any spoilers, but as the salt hay in the Great Marsh is lost […]

October 21, 2014

+
9:47 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
Article series investigates lead poisoning at the nation's gun ranges; autopsy shows coal miner was wrongly denied black lung benefits; health care workers take part in mass protective gear training; and a Wells Fargo employee sends a big email about income inequality.
+
9:00 PM | Getting a Motivation Makeover
Last week, doing anything was a struggle.  Literally all I wanted to do was watch cartoons, eat burritos, and perform the bare minimum tasks I could get away with doing (Editor’s note: This is me. Always).  Admitting these sorts of things is what makes the idea of an anonymous blog very appealing on occasion.  It’s not because I have a super exciting secret life or anything (spoiler alert: I find my own life very exciting on the whole), but because I think a lot of […]
+
8:02 PM | A Tale of Two Hemlocks
I have never poisoned anyone. I recently learned that if I were to try, I would be very bad at it. The hemlock I thought was poisonous turns out to just have an unfortunate common name. And rather than brewing up a batch of tainted tonic, I would apparently make my intended victim an aromatic cup of tea loaded in Vitamin C. While hiking around the Appalachians this past weekend, I spied tons of hemlock trees. “What a great post for October and Halloween… Hemlock!” I thought […]
+
3:28 PM | Karen’s Wetland Videos
One of my favorite places within our Platte River Prairies is a restored wetland we usually call “the sandpit wetland” because it is a former sand and gravel mining pit.  We restored the site over about 10 years, a little … Continue reading →
+
3:17 PM | Network Theory Seminar (Part 3)
  This time we use the principle of minimum power to determine what a circuit made of resistors actually does. Its ‘behavior’ is described by a functor sending circuits to linear relations between the potentials and currents at the input and output terminals. We call this the ‘black box’ functor, since it takes a circuit: […]
+
2:40 PM | Taxonomy vs research theme based conferences: which do you attend?
These two weeks are allowing me to contrast two very different kinds of meetings. As a member of the Linnean Centre of Plant Biology in Uppsala, I attended our yearly meeting last week*. The centre aims to bring together the plant biologists working in Uppsala and I was lucky that it started up in the…
+
8:56 AM | 1-on-1 with a Cardboard Extraordinaire!
Here’s snippets of my exclusive with cardboard sculptor – Bart Ting whom I met at Science Centre Singapore straight after his media interview only last Wed! Me: “Your installations all look massively impressive. Have you produced any miniatures?” Bart: “Yea! I designed a 23-cm F1 car, made from 2 pieces of A4 cardboard. It was… Continue reading »
123456789
322 Results