Posts

September 13, 2014

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10:32 PM | Vulnerability of biodiversity hotspots to invasive species and climate change
Cclose monitoring is now required to evaluate the biodiversity responses to invasive species and climate change and to test this study projections against observations. Continue reading →
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1:50 PM | Murmuration over Otmoor
SUMMARY: Tens of thousands of starlings produce spectacular sky shows with their movements at sunset as they gather together every evening during autumn and winter. September has arrived, so you all know what that means: the beginnings of huge bird flocks in autumn and winter! Just as humans spend more time congregating in pubs in autumn and winter, starlings also gather together in large numbers at these times. Every evening as the sun sets, small groups of a dozen or... Read more
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12:42 PM | The future of taxonomy | video | @GrrlScientist
This lovely video describes important work of Kew Botanical Gardens to publicly share taxonomic information about the monocots online and in one place for the first time.Ever since the first human ancestors realised that some plants were safe to eat whilst others were not, and some promoted health or well-being or created desirable altered mental states, weve been interested in identifying plants. And of course, being human, our brains are particularly well-designed to function as […]

September 12, 2014

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10:36 PM | Temp workers organize for change in an industry rife with reported abuses: ‘They would treat people as disposable’
For eight years, Dora worked at a frozen pizza factory in Romeoville, Illinois, called Great Kitchens. For eight hours a day — sometimes seven days a week — she assembled pizza boxes or arranged cheese and other toppings on pizzas. The consequences of years of such repetitive work surfaced in October 2012, when her hands would go numb and a painful cyst formed on her left wrist. She told her supervisor about the problem, but he said he couldn’t do anything about it — […]
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6:54 PM | Urban Cicada Safari
On September 2, as the 9-5ers emptied out of downtown Raleigh, we gathered near the State Legislature Building to embark on an urban insect adventure. Led by Bill Reynolds, curator of the Arthropod Zoo at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, we strolled the tree-lined sidewalks of the Legislature Complex, eyes peeled and ears tuned in quest of annual cicadas. Unlike their periodical cousins who show up every 13 or 17 years in a given location, the annual cicadas – also known as dog-day […]
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4:45 PM | Deep learning and vision
Object recognition is hard. Famously, an attempt to use computers to automatically identify tanks in photos in the 1980s failed in a clever way: But the scientists were worried: had it actually found a way to recognize if there was … Continue reading →
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4:07 PM | Monarchs and milkweed: Probing the plant, pollinator partnership
Learning more about the monarch-milkweed relationship. Continue reading →
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4:06 PM | Call for greater protection of endangered lynx in the US
New rules reduce rare wild cats critical habitat despite extending legal protection in 48 states. Continue reading →
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3:50 PM | Urban wildlife in pictures
Bristol-based photographer Sam Hobson portrays wildlife in British cities, from lapwings on a Manchester roof to fallow deer feeding by a London bus stop. Source: www.theguardian.comFiled under: Nature Conservation
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2:45 PM | Camping among the tombs
I found a road which led me to the Bonaventure graveyard. If that burying-ground across the Sea of Galilee, mentioned in Scripture, was half as beautiful as Bonaventure, I do not wonder that a man should dwell among the tombs. … Continue reading →
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1:06 PM | Photo of the Week – September 12, 2014
It’s grasshopper season! By the end of summer, most grasshoppers have completed their seven or eight molts and have become adults – complete with functional wings.   Now, as we walk and drive through our prairies, these fully-formed adult grasshoppers … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | What we’re reading: The phylogenomics of peanut allergens, saving the world with (and from) evolution, and how to make better figures
In the journals Ratnaparkhe MB, T-H Lee, X Tan, X Wang, J Li, C Kim, LK Rainville, C Lemke, RO Compton, J Robertson, M Gallo, DJ Bertioli, and AH Paterson. 2014. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of major peanut allergen gene … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Recommended reads #35
Papers that triumphed over their rejections. How world-changing papers by Fermi, Krebs, Higgs, Margulis, Brockman, Mullis and more were rejected by Science or Nature. It’s fascinating to see the rationales for rejecting these manuscripts that, in hindsight, are so huge and important. By Nikolai Slavov. The new “What if?” book by Randall Munroe of xkcd is spectacular. I think…
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (September 12th, 2014)
My latest for Slate: why I gave mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a turtle. This turtle CPR also got some coverage on The Dodo. I've been asked for my comment on a few different news/research stories lately. For example, here I am in National Geographic: Do female turtles "talk" to their hatchlings? And again for: Fish and eels team up to go hunting together. Finally,
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11:38 AM | Friday links: falsificationist vs. confirmationist science, transgendered scientists, lizard vs. iPhone, and more
Here’s what Meg and I did this week: Also this week: when flunking tests is good for you, don’t fight sexism by pretending nobody has kids, bad advice for graduate students, active learning the easy way, the two cultures of … Continue reading →
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9:30 AM | Nature Calls!
Have you seen this hot-off-the-press poster at the Science Centre Singapore? Yes, in a week’s time, we are going to launch our latest guidebook “A Guide to the Native Palms of Singapore” and “iSpied”, an iPhone nature app that you can use to observe and record sightings of the plants and animals around you. Lots… Continue reading »
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1:46 AM | #Biodiversity in the #balance, how is it #maintained?
Evolutionary theory and ecology have been brought together to explore one of the big questions in ecology: How is biodiversity developed and maintained? “This is a fundamental question if we want to protect biodiversity — what exactly do we need … Continue reading →
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1:45 AM | Lessons from the Field: Learning to Live with Wildlife
Living in the non-stop hustle and bustle of Washington, DC, I rarely get the chance to see the wildlife and habitats that we work so hard to protect. I recently got that chance. In addition, I met some of our … Continue reading →

September 11, 2014

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11:05 PM | Gender balanced conferences – we all need to try harder!
Recently a conference on Phylogenetic Comparative Methods was advertised online, and quickly the Twitter community noted that all six of the plenary talks were being given by men. Normally my response to this kind of thing would be some grumpy tweeting and then I’d let it go. However, this time was different; I know one of the organisers, several of the plenary speakers are my collaborators and this is the field I’ve dedicated the last eight years of my career to. Therefore I […]
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10:46 PM | Perdue announces reductions in antibiotics for poultry
Perdue Farms announces that it has slashed its use of antibiotics in poultry.
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7:43 PM | FLUMP – Ancient ecologial networks, climatic niche evolution, functional diversity
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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7:18 PM | Volunteer ‘eyes on the skies’ track peregrine falcon recovery in California
Datasets from long-running volunteer survey programs, c […]
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6:38 PM | Graduate positions available in Jeremy Fox’s lab for Fall 2015
You read my blog–want to join my lab? I’m currently seeking 2-3 graduate students (M.Sc. or Ph.D.) to start in Fall 2015. My own work addresses fundamental questions in population, community, and evolutionary ecology, through a combination of mathematical modeling … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | What is intelligence?
You may have heard that a recent GWAS study found three genes for heritable intelligence, though with tiny effects. There was a great quote in a Nature News article on the topic: “We haven’t found nothing,” he says. Yeah, you … Continue reading →
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4:42 PM | Yet another programming note
I’m in the midst of some intense experiments and don’t really have time for writing or thinking for the next week or two, which is why things have slowed down… I’ll try to post snippets of articles I find interesting … Continue reading →
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2:54 PM | Ninety seven consecutive seconds of dendroclimatology consensus
Filed under: Climate Related, Scientific Process

September 10, 2014

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11:00 PM | A Natural Offset for the Rio 2016 Olympic Park
Brazilian landscapes suffer rapid and repetitive transformations through intense and successive periods of exploitation—for example, the Brazilwood that gave the country its name, sugar cane, coffee, cattle, soy or urbanization and its infrastructural needs. Such degradation processes provoke losses of nature … Continue reading →
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10:45 PM | “I ventured out…”
A wild scene, but not a safe one, is made by the moon as it appears through the edge of the Yosemite Fall when one is behind it. Once…I ventured out on the narrow ledge that extends back of the … Continue reading →
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10:09 PM | Readers Write In: 'Tis the Season For Baby Snakes, What Are They?
I'm enclosing photos of a baby snake and an uncovered nest of snake eggs. I hope you can easily identify the snake from my photos.  I live in Northwest NC, (Traphill) about 5 miles West of Stone Mountain State Park. We live on a 40 acre wooded lot with a small stream nearby. The nest of eggs was about 1 or 2 inches below the ground. I uncovered the eggs while digging up weeds in my back yard
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9:32 PM | #IAmANaturalist storified
On Monday, ESA’s Natural History Section asked yo […]
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