Posts

January 05, 2015

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11:36 AM | Postdoc parental leave policies, part 2 (guest post)
Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post by Margaret Kosmala, a postdoc in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard. Note from Margaret: This is the third post in a mini-series examining the enormous variation in U.S. postdoc leave benefits. … Continue reading →
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10:35 AM | South Africa’s topsy-turvy seasons
  It’s easy to forget that seasons work in different ways in different places. On a recent trip to Kruger National Park in South Africa, I was expecting to see European breeding birds. I was also expecting that South Africa would be enjoying a season similar to a European spring; a simple six-month discrepancy with the northern hemisphere. While I found the European birds, including Swifts, Swallows, Cuckoos and Willow Warblers, I found a rather different type of spring. South Africa […]
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7:58 AM | Why Google Gave Up
I was disappointed when Google gave up. In 2007, the company announced a bold initiative to fight global warming: Google’s Goal: Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal Creates renewable energy R&D group and supports breakthrough technologies Mountain View, Calif. (November 27, 2007) – Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) today announced a new strategic initiative to develop electricity from […]

January 04, 2015

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8:49 PM | Under-the-Radar Environmental Stories for 2015: The Furtive Five
As we begin the new year, however, there are a number of stories slipping past the public eye that are worth highlighting. Five stand out: 1) Siberia’s Natural Resources—Exploited without Scrutiny, 2) A New Grand Canal, 3) The Smog of Iran, 4) The Brazilian Amazon—Is It Really on the Upswing?, and 5) Environmental reporting on the upswing? GR: I would add 6) population and 7) invasive species. Continue reading →
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1:11 PM | The Maryland Biodiversity Project: Mobilizing community to build a better picture of local biodiversity
We live in a time of unparalleled environmental change. How do we assess impacts if we don't have baseline data? State and federal agencies work tirelessly with limited resources to monitor just our rarest species. We need to monitor changes across the board for many reasons. First, it is far cheaper to manage for a given species when it is declining slightly than to wait until it requires a captive breeding program. Ecosystems are also complex, so trying to understand issues without […]

January 03, 2015

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10:53 PM | Applaud Efforts to Combat Wildlife Trafficking
GR: People must come to understand that many of the animals for sale in pet stores and on display in circuses and zoos were stolen from their native homes. Some of the most beautiful and most trusting species have been devastated for human entertainment. Please help. Continue reading →
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10:32 PM | Invasive Tropical Fish Are Changing Ocean Ecosystems
Tropical fish are moving north as the global climate warms, in some cases with devastating impacts to ocean ecosystems Continue reading →
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10:10 PM | How to do statistics
This fall, I wrote a series of “How to” blog posts that proved somewhat popular, or at least well-read:How to write/present science – 2700+ viewsHow to be a reviewer/editor – 2600+ viewsWhere to submit your paper – 4000+ viewsI hadn't initially planned a series like this, it just kind of emerged. However, I had long planned one particular “How to” post. Ironically, that post was the one I still hadn’t written. Now that it is 2015, the time seems […]
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5:01 PM | Micro_Urban: The Ecological and Social Potential of Small-Scale Urban Spaces
Small-scale urban spaces can be rich in biodiversity, contribute important ecological benefits for human mental and physical health (McPhearson et al., 2013), and overall help to create more livable cities. Micro_urban spaces are the sandwich spaces between buildings, rooftops, walls, curbs, … Continue reading →
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4:05 PM | Top Ten Animal New Year’s Resolutions
What's on your list of things to do in 2015? Get some ideas from animals that have big plans for the year!
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10:30 AM | The Squirrel Grand Nutional | @GrrlScientist
Enjoy a hawk’s-eye view of the squirrel Grand Nutional Steeplechase, which was run a few days ago at Faintree racecourse.I’ve recently been sharing cute hamster and squirrel videos for “Caturday” (the weekly animal appreciation day on the intertööbz), so imagine my delight when I noticed that Steve “the Squirrel Man of Hitchin’” Barley uploaded a new squirrel video onto his YouTube channel a couple days ago -- just in time for the first […]
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12:55 AM | California’s Environmental Devastation: Waking Up Is Hard to Do
Anyone familiar with natural landscapes recognizes that California has suffered destruction on a grand scale. Continue reading →

January 02, 2015

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10:51 PM | "Eyelash Cups" on Moose and Deer Dung: Cheilymenia stercorea
Okay, go ahead, call me weird, but ever since I found Pseudombrophila porcina polka-dotting my dog's poop last spring I've been getting down on my hands and knees in the woods to closely inspect the dung of other animals. If I see something that could be something, I bring it close to my eye so I can magnify it with my loupe.Handling dung isn't really a stretch for me. I'm an organic gardener, so I've been intimately familiar with livestock manure for going on thirty years. Black […]
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7:19 PM | ID Wildlife Lovers Start New Year With Three-Day Mass Slaughter Of Wolves And Coyotes
Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:http://news360.com/article/272715208/# by Kerry-Anne January 2, 2015 At dawn this morning, Idaho gun-lovers began a contest to kill as many wolves and coyotes as possible – with prizes of $1,000 each for the overall…
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6:12 PM | The population (and ecosystem!) ecology of Pablo Escobar’s hippos
Last summer, while I was preparing lectures for Intro Bio*, I saw something on twitter about Pablo Escobar’s hippos. The short version of the story, which is summarized in this BBC piece, is that Pablo Escobar, the Colombian drug baron, … Continue reading →
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5:42 PM | Bad luck, bad journalism and cancer rates | @BobOHara @GrrlScientist
Please, journalists, get a clue before you write about scienceThe big science/health news story this week is about cancer rates, with news outlets splashing headlines like “Two-thirds of adult cancers largely ‘down to bad luck’ rather than genes” (for example, here) or “Most cancer types ‘just bad luck’” (here). (I’m not even going to look to see what the Daily Mail has to say about this.) But these headlines, and the stories, are just […]
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4:29 PM | Meet the lab: Elyssa Cameron
Here’s another in the “Meet the lab” series – written by Master’s student Elyssa Cameron. Like many in my field, my love of nature and the creatures which inhabit it began much earlier than I can remember. From camping trips to day camps to museums and everything in between, I have always been passionate about […]
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3:37 PM | New books party: the BES edition | @GrrlScientist
Thanks to the British Ecological Society, I am sharing some scholarly and academic-type books about all sorts of interesting biological topics, including ecological speciation, emerging infections, scientific writing and even a monograph of the domestic cat.I was most honoured to be invited to attend the British Ecological Society’s annual meeting, jointly held with the French Ecological Society, in Lille, France this past December. Whilst there, I managed to attract quite a flock of […]
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1:00 PM | Recommended reads #43
In an intentional experiment in peer review, the organizers in a computer science conference discover that half of the papers accepted to the conference would have been rejected if the review process were rerun. (Note: in computer science, conference presentations are the meaningful currency of academic productivity, not journal pubs.) The University of Alaska is…
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11:34 AM | Friday links: evolution card game, abuse of parsimony, and more
Happy New Year! Also this week: an interview with science’s best friend in Congress, some interesting suggestions for improving peer review, why nobody reads your preprints, the economics of academic books, and more. Also: what if longtime readers tire of … Continue reading →
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3:02 AM | 2014 Reflections, Resolutions, and Round-Up
Hello, 2015! Rachel and I are living it up with our lovely friends in Boston. This year has been wonderful thus far, but we wanted to take a few moments and reflect on the wonderful things that 2014 brought to us.  One of the most rewarding things for us, in the last year, was starting this blog.  From the launch of our Tumblr blog in January of 2014 to occupying this space in May, we feel so blessed to have this space to share our experiences as travelers, learners, and burgeoning […]
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1:41 AM | New Year Resolutions
Tabitha Gan underwent an internship at the Science Centre Singapore (SCS) in December 2014. She has written this blog post during her internship at SCS. Your brain and self-control People make them constantly. But a series of studies done by clinical psychologist John Norcross has shown that most people don’t manage to keep their New… Continue reading »
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12:51 AM | Fatal work injury that killed Stanley Thomas Wright was preventable, Nevada OSHA cites Rebel Oil Co.
The fatal work-related injuries that killed Stanley Thomas Wright could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

January 01, 2015

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7:58 PM | Update: Plant Health News (01 Jan 15)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including CARDI’s contribution to food and nutrition security over its 40 year history, efforts to protect bananas from TR4 Fusarium wilt and the use of weaver ants as biological control. Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news! […]
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5:08 PM | Quotes for the New Year
R.A. Fisher is the guest of honor to bring in the New Year: The tendency of modern scientific teaching is to neglect the great books, to lay far too much stress upon relatively unimportant modern work, and to present masses of detail … Continue reading →
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3:13 AM | Photo of the Week – December 31, 2014
I am on vacation this week, so apologies for not posting much.  My kids and I are skiing in Wyoming (Snowy Range) and having a great time despite some very cold temperatures (we started today at 33 below zero!)  Because … Continue reading →

December 31, 2014

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6:37 PM | Highlights from The Nature of Cities in 2014
It’s been a great year at The Nature of Cities. The number of contributors has grown to almost 170, and we published 100+ blogs, long-form essays, and global roundtables. Most important, we’ve attracted more and more readers: in 2015 we … Continue reading →
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4:51 PM | Citizen Naturalists Volunteer Opportunity in Ecuador | SE7EN
Here's a citizen-naturalist volunteer opportunity in Ecuador. Continue reading →
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4:38 PM | Collapse of Avian Biodiversity in the Pacific – MAHB
The state of the birds on Pacific islands is a harbinger of a catastrophe that looms globally. Continue reading →
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3:33 PM | Chronic work exposure to lead and risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Individuals with chronic occupational exposure to lead have an 80 percent higher odds of developing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) than individuals who do not have the exposure.
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