Posts

August 28, 2014

+
6:43 PM | Photo of the Week – August 28, 2014
I made a quick run out to our family prairie this week to see how our grazing management was looking.  It was a beautiful evening for a stroll, as the sun went down through layers of diffuse clouds.  The abundant rain this year … Continue reading →
+
6:16 PM | Looking at the Past to Understand the Future
No question, our planet is heating up. So what impact will global climate change have on biodiversity and ecosystems? This BIG question, as you’ve undoubtedly read here on our blog, is near and dear to many Your Wild Life-affiliated researchers. Over the years, they’ve taken several different approaches to studying the consequences of global climate change on organisms and ecosystems. One approach is to do experiments. Heat something up and see what happens to say, ants living on […]
+
5:55 PM | Trapjaw ants, filmed at 600 frames per second
By Adrian Smith; taken from Myrmecos.
+
5:40 PM | The smell of rain: what is petrichor?
pet·ri·chor ˈpeˌtrīkôr/ noun a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather. “other than the petrichor emanating from the rapidly drying grass, there was not a trace of evidence that it had … Continue reading →
+
11:00 AM | Do you allow laptops in class?
As we gear up for the start of the semester (we don’t start until next week), I am once again considering whether to allow laptops in class. My recent musings on this were sparked by Anne Curzan’s post in the … Continue reading →
+
5:44 AM | The Stochastic Resonance Program (Part 2)
guest post by David Tanzer Last time we introduced the concept of stochastic resonance. Briefly, it’s a way that noise can amplify a signal, by giving an extra nudge that helps a system receiving that signal make the jump from one state to another. Today we’ll describe a program that demonstrates this concept. But first, […]
+
4:03 AM | Carnival of Evolution #74
Well, it’s a couple of weeks late, but Carnival of Evolution #74 is now out.  Our contribution was Craig Benkman’s fascinating post about “A small mammal with an outsized impact”.  With more than 500 views already, it’s one of our most popular posts ever, and deservedly so.  So if you haven’t read it, check it out!  There are lots of other goodies in the carnival; I was very interested in the discussion of ring species by Jerry Coyne, for […]

August 27, 2014

+
10:37 PM | Wordless Wednesday August 27
Tagged: Ecology, light, nature, photography, trees, Wordless Wednesdays
+
9:15 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
Texas workers face higher workplace fatality risks; Washington state court ruling holds parent company liable for wage violations; rail workers dismayed by union deal that threatens safety; and transgender workers receive new workplace protections.
+
7:01 PM | Recommended reads #34
Here is an especially gorgeous and fascination-inducing natural history site called Corner of the Cabinet. This essay called Change the Tenure System came out at the start of the year but was just brought to my attention. I think it’s the most concise and spot-on definition of the problems and false assumptions built into how…
+
6:32 PM | Good News: We’ve all got mites!
Over the last year and a half, hundreds of you volunteered to have your faces scraped for science. In looking at the contents of your face goop, we’ve uncovered some of the mysteries of the tiny, some might even say charming, arthropod that lives within the hair follicles and glands of your skin — your Demodex mites. Today we’re pleased to announce the publication of our first research paper from the Meet Your Mites project: Thoemmes MS, Fergus DJ, Urban J, Trautwein M, Dunn […]
+
5:14 PM | Food, Politics and Sustainability: An Introduction to the Native American Food Sovereignty Movement
Throughout the United States a movement for food sovereignty has emerged among a number of Tribal Nations and communities. ‘Food sovereignty’ was first coined by members of La Via Campesina in […]
+
4:41 PM | New Rule(s): Stop F&%$ing with our Oceans.
Trash in the North Pacific Gyre I mean, have you ever been to Texas? Even on the scale of the North Pacific Ocean, it’s big. And when you double it, it’s nearly twice the size! Killer Whale‘s Family Cries As Orca…
+
3:33 PM | Irreversible damage from climate change seen in leaked UN paper
Greenhouse gas and other human impacts have created a global emergency. Continue reading →
+
2:33 PM | It just won’t get you there
I’ve got two little feet to get me across the mountain Two little feet to carry me away into the woods Two little feet A big mountain And a cloud coming down, a cloud a comin’ down I hear the … Continue reading →
+
12:00 PM | It’s nice to have administrators you can trust
Last week, our campus had its back-to-school events. Our administrators talked about their big plans. There was one Thing that the President talked about for a few minutes. The Provost talked about the same Thing for a half hour. My Dean talked about It for about twenty minutes. When I had lunch next to my…
+
11:46 AM | Is there any way to avoid having to write all-new assignments every term for the classes I teach?
Ok readers, I give you plenty of advice, so now it’s payback time! :-) I need your help, with a problem I suspect many of you have: is there any good way to avoid writing all-new assignments every term for … Continue reading →
+
9:51 AM | Update: Plant Health News (27 Aug 14)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including surveillance robots that can detect weeds and pest insects, a focus on gender capacity development in Ethiopia and smallholder farmers in Africa adopting practices to improve their field soil health. Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news! Sky-high […]
+
9:42 AM | Eggcellent citizen science: evolution of camouflage in bird eggs | @GrrlScientist
How an online video game relies on citizen scientists to test the evolution of avian egg camouflage colours and patterns.Ive been enviously following the events at the recent International Ornithological Congress, held in Tokyo, Japan. One of the many interesting things that I ran across in my communications with the congress attendees was an online video game that challenges the viewer to spot a camouflaged bird egg in a short period of time. This video game, which is entertaining and rather […]

August 26, 2014

+
9:03 PM | The ‘Equal Streets’ Movement in Mumbai
Roads are a significant aspect of a city’s environment, both in terms of the area they occupy as well as their socio-environmental condition. In Mumbai for example, nearly 2000 km of roads occupy approximately 40 km2 of land. This is … Continue reading →
+
8:57 PM | Field Day Reminder – TOMORROW, Rain or Shine! Also, A Bee Photo
A reminder – we will have our Platte River Prairies Field Day tomorrow, August 27, from 9am to 3:30.  Details can be found here. Rain is in the forecast for tomorrow, but it looks like the best chances for precipitation … Continue reading →
+
7:55 PM | Sacramento
In the middle of August, thousands of ecologists gathered in the city of Sacramento for what was gonna be the . . .
+
6:24 PM | The sound of silence
Sensory neurons receive input from the outside world and send these signals on to the rest of the nervous system. This makes the concept of ‘silence’ fairly intriguing: what happens when there is very little sensory signal for the rest … Continue reading →
+
6:20 PM | Aerial Hunter Killing Washington Wolves
Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:Hunter Hired by Washington State Kills 1 Wolf SPOKANE, Wash. — Aug 25, 2014, 5:08 PM ET By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS Associated Press One wolf has been killed by a hunter hired by…
+
5:23 PM | 3quarksdaily nominates best science writing
3quarksdaily has their nominations up for the year’s Best Science Writing. You should go read, and vote. I started to aggregate the list of articles but it looks like the majority are related to neuroscience or ecology! That’s a crazy … Continue reading →
+
4:12 PM | Hubbard Fellowship Post – Dillon the Prairie Doctor
This post is written by Dillon Blankenship, one of our Hubbard Fellows. Becoming a Prairie Doctor (or Living in a World of Wounds) Last weekend I drove back to Arkansas to attend a wedding. It is a sizable drive (approximately … Continue reading →
+
3:33 PM | Junior Scientists Take on Invasive Ants in New York City
Two junior researchers, Stephen Coyle (a rising college sophomore, top) and Kevin Catalan (a high school student, bottom), have been hard at work at Fordham University in New York City looking at how different colonies of invasive ants have been affected by Superstorm Sandy. I sat down with them virtually to discuss their exciting research in the lab of our collaborator, Dr. Sergios-Orestis Kolokotronis. Kevin, I’ll start with you. Maybe you can tell me a little bit about […]
+
2:40 PM | The #IcedBudgetChallenge: Tell Congress to thaw out funding for NSF and NIH!
So a friend nominated me in this viral scheme to raise funds for ALS research, about which you may have heard lately. I’m all in favor of finding a cure for ALS—my grandfather died of it—but I’m also pretty skeptical … Continue reading →
+
2:27 PM | Magpies don’t like shiny things
Wild ThingsAnimals by Sarah Zielinski 12:30pm, August 26, 2014 Magpies have a reputation for thievery and are supposedly fond of shiny things. A new study finds no evidence of that.Stefan Berndtsson/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)Magpies deserve our apology. Apparently humans have been unnecessarily maligning the birds for centuries. They actually aren’t attracted to shiny things, and they’re […]
+
8:54 AM | 25 years of ecology – what’s changed?
I am giving/gave a talk this morning at a Festschrift celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Graduate Ecology program at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), the large state university in one of the larger states/cities in Brazil. So … Continue reading →
4567891011
304 Results