Posts

October 10, 2014

+
3:09 AM | Office of the Auditor General of Canada—Mitigating Climate Change
Overall, we found that federal departments have made unsatisfactory progress in each of the four areas examined. Continue reading →
+
12:39 AM | Saving Caribbean Coral Reefs
IUCN used data from 35,000 surveys conducted at 90 Caribbean locations since 1970, and showed that reefs have declined by more than 50% since the 1970s. Continue reading →
+
12:07 AM | Ocean Acidification: The Complete Loss of Tropical Coral Reefs By 2050 to 2100
"The pace at which humans are increasing ocean acidification has never been seen before in the geological record. So the blow that is coming to many of the animals we rely on is worse than anything witnessed in Earth’s past." Continue reading →

October 09, 2014

+
11:26 PM | Joyce 2014 field season preview
This upcoming field season we will be getting to know Lake Joyce of the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys very well.  For seven weeks, 5-7 of us will live and work within the confines of Pearse Valley, with a valley floor all of 3 miles long and 1.5 miles wide.   Our field camp in Pearse Valley, 2010Our attention will be focused on the bottom of Lake Joyce and the microbial communities that call it home.  In previous seasons, we dove on one side of the lake, near locations where […]
+
11:01 PM | Still Life
I thought it would be a nice idea to have the occasional photography contest on the blog. So starting today and running until Monday 10th November anyone can submit one photograph to this Dropbox folder. Don’t make it obvious that it’s your image in case it biases the judge. The theme for this month will be ‘Changing Seasons’. Prizes will be determined in due course. I just want to say good luck. We’re all counting on you. Author: Adam Kane, […]
+
7:27 PM | Looking Back at the Water Taste Challenge
Find out what Earth Rangers like you had to say about the Water Taste Challenge!
+
6:47 PM | How many markers does it take to make a dataset “genomic”?
A new paper in Ecology Letters by Matthew Fitzpatrick and Stephen Keller proposes to use some a class of statistical methods developed for understanding the distribution of species in different environments to understand the distribution of genetic variants in different … Continue reading →
+
6:43 PM | World wildlife populations ‘plummet’
The global loss of species is even worse than previously thought, with wildlife populations halving in just 40 years, a report says. Continue reading →
+
6:33 PM | Wildlife decline: Why does biodiversity matter anyway? – Christian Science Monitor
Half of the planet's wildlife populations suffered severe decline between 1970 and 2010, according to a new report from the WWF. So what does dwindling biodiversity mean for us? Continue reading →
+
6:25 PM | The WWFs report on the shockingly rapid decline in wildlife should surely move us to action | Michelle Nijhuis
Most of us will be forced to combat climate change, but the ones profiting from it will not. Continue reading →
+
6:18 PM | Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally. More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject … Continue reading →
+
5:03 PM | River Flow By Design: Environmental Flows Support Ecosystem Services In Rivers Natural And Novel
"When the sun peeped over the Sierra Madre, it slanted across a hundred miles of lovely desolation, a vast flat bowl of wilderness rimmed by jagged peaks. On the map the Delta was bisected by the river, but in fact the river was nowhere and everywhere, for he could not decide which of a hundred green lagoons offered the most pleasant and least speedy path to the Gulf."
+
3:49 PM | Kavli Prize
Looks like it’s science prize week on neuroecology… I missed that the Kavli prize winners were announced earlier this month. The Kavli Prize goes to researchers in astrophysics, nanophysics, and neuroscience (yeah, I don’t get the connection either.) This year’s … Continue reading →
+
12:49 PM | Long-acting contraceptives for teens
The American Academy of Pediatrics published a "Contraceptives for Adolescents" policy statement that advises pediatricians to consider long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods as first-line contraceptive choices for adolescents. Recent research shows that women, including teens, will choose LARCs when cost is not a barrier and when healthcare providers can help patients choose and access the contraceptives that best meet their needs.
+
11:45 AM | Poll results: what should ecologists learn less of?
Here, for what they’re worth*, are the results so far from yesterday’s poll asking readers to name the most important thing for ecologists to learn more of, and the thing they should learn less of in order to free up … Continue reading →
+
4:59 AM | Go read the Survey of Academic Field Experiences study!
As happens to any academic study that receives a lot of press coverage and blogger attention, the actual content of the Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE) study by Clancy et al. (2014) has gotten a bit obscured in the ensuing … Continue reading →
+
4:54 AM | Fighting the war on science
There has been a long-standing dogma within the scientific community that scientists can not, and should not, be activists. “To be effective,” my undergraduate mentor told me, “scientists need to be impartial, they need to do science and let others worry about the advocacy.” I was as dissatisfied then and I am today, almost 10 years later (!!!!), with the choice that he put to me. “If you want to go into advocacy, that’s great, but you have to choose that […]
+
1:50 AM | It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s …
Dominic? That’s right. Dominic Fonde to be exact! The Brit’s in da house! In town actually. For a limited time only. While the exhibition lasts. “What exhibition?” you ask. I’ll come to that in a minute… It was great to see Dominic – my glass blowing, drill engraving artiste of a friend who has been… Continue reading »
+
1:01 AM | Citizen Naturalist Opportunities
There are many citizen naturalist projects you can join. Continue reading →

October 08, 2014

+
8:58 PM | ESA Policy News October 8: Obama designates world’s largest marine reserve, Science committee reviews NSF grants
Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
+
6:38 PM | What is the motivation for pursuing graduate school?
Last week an interesting hashtag was floating around twitter:  #whyididaphd.  It was great to see reflections on this topic, and during our most recent lab meeting, I asked my students why they were pursuing advanced research-based degrees, and here are some of their responses: Graduate school allows an opportunity for freedom to do the things […]
+
6:01 PM | Nobel Prizes in Neuroscience
After O’Keefe and the Mosers winning the Nobel prize this year, I was wondering how many of the prizes have been for neuroscience research (directly). From the full list, these seem to be the winners: The Nobel Prize in Physiology or … Continue reading →
+
5:29 PM | Byssinosis, an infamous booklet, and Reagan-era OSHA
In his first week on the job, President Reagan's appointee to head OSHA ordered a booklet about the hazards of cotton dust destroyed. He considered the image and words of textile workers afflicted by "brown lung" disease "biased."
+
5:00 PM | Zebra finches use camouflage
Wild ThingsAnimals BY Sarah Zielinski 2:00pm, October 8, 2014 Male zebra finches are the nest builders in this species. A new study suggests that they camouflage their nests to blend in with the background.William Warby/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)Bird’s nests come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, and […]
+
4:55 PM | I see the mountain
I was born in a fork-tongued story Raised up by merchants and drug store liars Now I walk on the paths of glory One foot in ice and one in fire Some build temples, some find alters Some come in … Continue reading →
+
4:43 PM | New Old Perspectives
The first month in the Netherlands and of MSc Forest and Nature Conservation at Wageningen University (WUR) is behind me. And what an interesting and illuminating month that was! About programme, people and Conservation.
+
3:15 PM | Warts & All!
Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire, burn; and cauldron, bubble. Shakespeare’s witches open Macbeth by tossing a toad into their cauldron, along with parts of snakes, newts, bats and other dejected, unfortunate creatures. Why such a bad rap? After all, people LOVE frogs – they turn into princes and are considered quite lucky by some cultures. But toads? Feared, reviled. What’s the big difference? Toads (like the American toad, Bufo americanus, pictured above) tend to live […]
+
1:56 PM | Urban Protected Areas: Important for Urban People, Important for Nature Conservation Globally
The international conservation movement traditionally has concentrated on protecting large, remote areas that have relatively intact natural ecosystems. It has given a lot less attention to urban places and urban people. About ten years ago, four of us long involved … Continue reading →
+
1:16 PM | White Lab PhD openings at the University of Florida
I’m looking for one or more graduate students to join my group next fall. In addition to the official add (below) I’d like to add a few extra thoughts. As Morgan Ernest noted in her recent ad, we have a relatively unique setup at Weecology in that we interact actively with members of the Ernest […]
+
11:13 AM | What should ecologists learn LESS of?
There are lots of things that it would be nice for ecologists to know more of. Natural history. Math. Programming. Statistical techniques. The mathematical foundations of statistics. Philosophy of science. Genetics. Evolution. Other things. If you’re like me, you probably … Continue reading →
34567891011
306 Results