Posts

September 12, 2014

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12:00 PM | Recommended reads #35
Papers that triumphed over their rejections. How world-changing papers by Fermi, Krebs, Higgs, Margulis, Brockman, Mullis and more were rejected by Science or Nature. It’s fascinating to see the rationales for rejecting these manuscripts that, in hindsight, are so huge and important. By Nikolai Slavov. The new “What if?” book by Randall Munroe of xkcd is spectacular. I think…
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (September 12th, 2014)
My latest for Slate: why I gave mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a turtle. This turtle CPR also got some coverage on The Dodo. I've been asked for my comment on a few different news/research stories lately. For example, here I am in National Geographic: Do female turtles "talk" to their hatchlings? And again for: Fish and eels team up to go hunting together. Finally,
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11:38 AM | Friday links: falsificationist vs. confirmationist science, transgendered scientists, lizard vs. iPhone, and more
Here’s what Meg and I did this week: Also this week: when flunking tests is good for you, don’t fight sexism by pretending nobody has kids, bad advice for graduate students, active learning the easy way, the two cultures of … Continue reading →
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9:30 AM | Nature Calls!
Have you seen this hot-off-the-press poster at the Science Centre Singapore? Yes, in a week’s time, we are going to launch our latest guidebook “A Guide to the Native Palms of Singapore” and “iSpied”, an iPhone nature app that you can use to observe and record sightings of the plants and animals around you. Lots… Continue reading »
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1:46 AM | #Biodiversity in the #balance, how is it #maintained?
Evolutionary theory and ecology have been brought together to explore one of the big questions in ecology: How is biodiversity developed and maintained? “This is a fundamental question if we want to protect biodiversity — what exactly do we need … Continue reading →
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1:45 AM | Lessons from the Field: Learning to Live with Wildlife
Living in the non-stop hustle and bustle of Washington, DC, I rarely get the chance to see the wildlife and habitats that we work so hard to protect. I recently got that chance. In addition, I met some of our … Continue reading →

September 11, 2014

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11:05 PM | Gender balanced conferences – we all need to try harder!
Recently a conference on Phylogenetic Comparative Methods was advertised online, and quickly the Twitter community noted that all six of the plenary talks were being given by men. Normally my response to this kind of thing would be some grumpy tweeting and then I’d let it go. However, this time was different; I know one of the organisers, several of the plenary speakers are my collaborators and this is the field I’ve dedicated the last eight years of my career to. Therefore I […]
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10:46 PM | Perdue announces reductions in antibiotics for poultry
Perdue Farms announces that it has slashed its use of antibiotics in poultry.
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7:43 PM | FLUMP – Ancient ecologial networks, climatic niche evolution, functional diversity
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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7:18 PM | Volunteer ‘eyes on the skies’ track peregrine falcon recovery in California
Datasets from long-running volunteer survey programs, c […]
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6:38 PM | Graduate positions available in Jeremy Fox’s lab for Fall 2015
You read my blog–want to join my lab? I’m currently seeking 2-3 graduate students (M.Sc. or Ph.D.) to start in Fall 2015. My own work addresses fundamental questions in population, community, and evolutionary ecology, through a combination of mathematical modeling … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | What is intelligence?
You may have heard that a recent GWAS study found three genes for heritable intelligence, though with tiny effects. There was a great quote in a Nature News article on the topic: “We haven’t found nothing,” he says. Yeah, you … Continue reading →
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4:42 PM | Yet another programming note
I’m in the midst of some intense experiments and don’t really have time for writing or thinking for the next week or two, which is why things have slowed down… I’ll try to post snippets of articles I find interesting … Continue reading →
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2:54 PM | Ninety seven consecutive seconds of dendroclimatology consensus
Filed under: Climate Related, Scientific Process

September 10, 2014

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11:00 PM | A Natural Offset for the Rio 2016 Olympic Park
Brazilian landscapes suffer rapid and repetitive transformations through intense and successive periods of exploitation—for example, the Brazilwood that gave the country its name, sugar cane, coffee, cattle, soy or urbanization and its infrastructural needs. Such degradation processes provoke losses of nature … Continue reading →
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10:45 PM | “I ventured out…”
A wild scene, but not a safe one, is made by the moon as it appears through the edge of the Yosemite Fall when one is behind it. Once…I ventured out on the narrow ledge that extends back of the … Continue reading →
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10:09 PM | Readers Write In: 'Tis the Season For Baby Snakes, What Are They?
I'm enclosing photos of a baby snake and an uncovered nest of snake eggs. I hope you can easily identify the snake from my photos.  I live in Northwest NC, (Traphill) about 5 miles West of Stone Mountain State Park. We live on a 40 acre wooded lot with a small stream nearby. The nest of eggs was about 1 or 2 inches below the ground. I uncovered the eggs while digging up weeds in my back yard
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9:32 PM | #IAmANaturalist storified
On Monday, ESA’s Natural History Section asked yo […]
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9:17 PM | Andrea Kidd-Taylor: Public health leader, worker safety advocate, justice seeker
The public health community is mourning the loss of Andrea Kidd-Taylor, DrPH, MSPH, 59, who died on September 1 from cancer.
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7:48 PM | ESA Policy News September 10: Congress aims to avoid shutdown, ESA reaffirms opposition to travel bill
Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
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4:46 PM | Science needs voices. All of them. Thank you @ehmee. by Madhusudan Katti
I can’t tell you how glad I am, as a father of daughters growing up in today’s world, that we have Emily Graslie’s voice, inspiring them every day in ways that I cannot, building their confidence so they too can add their voices to the conversation, as the discoverers and adventurers and explorers they are, […]
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3:40 PM | 7 cool facts about drain flies and their kin
Over the last few days, we’ve received a few notes and photos (see above) from folks describing fuzzy, moth-like flies flitting about their kitchen or bathroom. So we turned to our favorite bug guru, Matt Bertone, for the inside scoop: 1. Flies in the family Psychodidae (particularly the subfamily Psychodinae) are often called moth flies or drain flies. The former name comes from the covering of hairs and scale-like hairs that give these flies the appearance of a fuzzy little moth (which […]
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12:00 PM | Active learning is flexible and designed to reach the reticent
I’ve gotten positive feedback about a post in which I explain how it’s not that much work for me to do active learning in the classroom. However, a couple entirely reasonable misgiving seem to crop up, and I’d like to give my take on those causes for reluctance to start up with active learning approaches. The first concern is that…
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11:01 AM | Update: Plant Health News (10 Sep 14)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including some homegrown news of Plantwise data used to study the global spread of crop pests, cassava brown streak disease wreaking havoc in Rwanda, and fireblight hitting Canadian apple orchards hard. Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health […]
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11:00 AM | Tractable != easy
When I give seminars about my work and when I write grant proposals, I often talk about how tractable it is – the hosts are see-through, allowing you to see internal parasites! You can maintain individual genotypes in the lab … Continue reading →
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9:55 AM | Archaeologists Unearth Massive "Super-Henge" Near Stonehenge
Credit: Ludwig Boltzmann InstituteAn archaeological project utilizing new technology has revealed new monuments belonging to the ancient ritualistic landscape that is home to the famous Stonehenge. Perhaps the most startling of these new monuments is a "super henge" several times larger than Stonehenge itself.The Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project, a joint venture by the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute and the University of Birmingham, took four years to complete its surveys. The impressive results […]
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9:21 AM | Which plants are the influencers in plant-pollinator networks?
My PhD looked at two invasive plants that has contrasting effects on the native plant-pollinator network. Since then we advanced quite a lot on understanding why superabundant invasive plants with high reward levels can influence others via its shared pollinators, but … Continue reading →
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12:52 AM | A Tale of Two Islands
Despite its title, this story is not exactly about two islands. It’s more about the eight-legged inhabitants of two groups of islands. But fear not arachnophobes, body size and parasitism do not feature in today’s plot. Instead we travel to the Hawaiian Islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean to unravel a mystery. The Hawaiian and Mascarene

September 09, 2014

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11:05 PM | We’re back!
It’s that time of year again, the quiet before the storm of Fresher’s week and the start of a new academic year. After our short break, EcoEvo@TCD is back and raring to go. You can expect lots more posts about our research, seminar series, outreach activities, conferences and fieldwork as well as tips and tricks for surviving in academia. We’ve already kicked off the year with our second annual NERD club AGM. It was a great opportunity to discuss what we covered […]
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10:19 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
In-depth series investigates worker misclassification; NIOSH observes N95 Day; fast food workers take to the streets; and California moves toward paid sick leave law.
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