Posts

December 03, 2014

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10:10 AM | Update: Plant Health News (03 Dec 14)
Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including farmers in Bangladesh benefiting from early variety potatoes, water-saving technology introduced to rice farms in Vietnam and a model guava farm developed in India using traditional and modern methods. Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news! Bangladesh: […]
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2:56 AM | Assess the Stress
This is it guys. Two more weeks and then FINALS! Wow, two sentences into a blog post and I’m already about to reach for the stress chocolate I have stashed in my desk right next to the stress tea. Admittedly, the rest of the semester is going to be non-stop GO, GO, GO, for me and a lot of y’all out there. We’ve all being kicking ass this year and nothing is stopping us now. Even that crippling fear of ending the semester in a horrific crash and burn finals extravaganza […]

December 02, 2014

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11:17 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
New Mexico dairy farm workers face dangerous workplace conditions and fears of retaliation; Chicago passes minimum wage increase; worker dies at Staten Island car dealership; and Philadelphia task force supports paid sick leave.
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9:28 PM | The Montado, the Mouse and Landscape Connectivity
It’s been quite a few years since I visited Portugal during my third year field trip as part of my undergraduate Applied Ecology degree in University College Cork.  It was a memorable trip where we learned a great deal about Mediterranean ecology from our UCC lecturers. I believe one of the lasting influences  from the […]

Mullins J, Ascensão F, Simões L, Andrade L, Santos-Reis M, Fernandes C (2014). Evaluating connectivity between Natura 2000 sites within the montado agroforestry system: a case study using landscape genetics of the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), Landscape Ecology, DOI: 10.1007/s10980-014-0130-z

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9:26 PM | New diseases travel on the wings of birds in a rapidly changing north
When wild birds are a big part of your diet, opening a […]
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5:36 PM | Camel Cricket Poetry
The mail room of a science building is always an interesting place. We receive email notices like, “Your slime mold has arrived!” and “Live crickets in the mail room, no name.” And some days, our mail room is full of beautiful little dead bugs carefully packaged and sent special, just for us. Sometimes the mail room is full of poetry. Today I opened a package containing both and I had to share [an excerpt]: “On more than one occasion,  I have briefly […]
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4:35 PM | No one will remember you because society doesn’t care
A few years ago I was in Washington DC and, being a bit of a tourist, I randomly picked up a fact card about one of our exciting presidents. Obviously the excitement mounted: who did I get? My best buddy … Continue reading →

Roediger, H. & DeSoto, K. (2014). Forgetting the presidents, Science, 346 (6213) 1106-1109. DOI: 10.1126/science.1259627

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2:41 PM | The genetics of another multi-level society
Long-time readers (i.e., “for more than one week”) of The Molecular Ecologist will notice that this is the 2nd post on the socio-genetics of a primate multi-level society. The first being Melissa’s post last week that covered my recent paper … Continue reading →
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2:25 PM | Are Namibia’s Rhinos Now Under Siege?
Originally posted on strange behaviors:Early this year in The New York Times, I wrote an op-ed in praise of Namibia’s work in restoring populations of endangered black rhinos and, more important, in avoiding the poaching nightmare taking place next…
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1:54 PM | Wanna Know What Really Makes A Sunflower Lose its Head?
Nearly-decapitated sunflower heads, scattered across the prairie.  Oh, the devastation!  Who could be carrying out such an evil plan? (Ok, more accurately, a weevil plan?) The head-clipping weevil, aka the Silphium weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus) is a small dark-colored weevil, less … Continue reading →
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1:19 PM | Why are your statistical models more complex these days?
I serve on a lot of graduate committees. I also end up as statistical consultant for a lot of students and faculty. So I see a lot of people thinking through their models and statistical approaches. One trend I am … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | This biodiversity researcher used Flickr for data, and you won’t BELIEVE what happened next!
Students of Biodiversity Science, rejoice! No more feeling guilty about spending time on Facebook while eating your lunch at your . . .

December 01, 2014

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10:29 PM | New York, New Frog: Leopard Frog Species Found in New York City
New leopard frog found in New York. Picture credit: Matthew Schlesinger, New York Natural Heritage Program, via National Geographic.By Jon Fern, Science EditorIt’s one of the most heavily populated places on Earth, and probably the last place you would imagine a new species to pop (or hop...) up in, but New York City is home to a frog that’s only now been described by science.The leopard frog, Rana kauffeldi, is described in a paper published in Molecular Phylogenetics and […]
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9:03 PM | Feeding the Buzzards
Birds of Prey in Ireland  About 100 years ago, Ireland was devoid of large birds of prey like buzzards, red kites and golden eagles. Their populations were decimated by human persecution, but thankfully these mighty predators are starting to make a comeback thanks to environmental protection, the banning of poisons like strychnine, successful reintroduction programmes, […]

Rooney E. & W. Ian Montgomery (2014). Supplementary feeding increases Common Buzzard Buteo buteo productivity but only in poor-quality habitat , Ibis, n/a-n/a. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12218

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8:46 PM | Carnival of Evolution #77: The Carnival is Dead, Long Live the Carnival
Carnival of Evolution #77 is now up at… the Carnival of Evolution blog.Apparently, Eco-Evo-Evo-Eco had the unanticipated honor of hosting the very last independently hosted CoE, Carnival of Evolution #76, on 2 October 2014.  I guess Felipe P. J. did such an amazing job hosting that nobody wanted to try to follow his act; Bjørn was unable to find a host for November.  So Bjørn will now be hosting the CoE locally, on the CoE blog itself; he has apparently gotten […]
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6:44 PM | Squirrels Live in Leaf Balls
If you have spotted a leaf ball high up in the trees you might be standing at the doorstep of a squirrel’s home!
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5:38 PM | Worth reading: Ferguson, doomed health programs, and retail jobs
Recent pieces address President Obama's remarks on events in Ferguson, an Obamacare program that works but is shutting down, retail workers' pay, and more.
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5:36 PM | Hand-to-hand combat between animals and cells
  From an article on white blood cells (eosinophils) attacking nematodes, it is like something out of a horror movie. What is amazing about this is that these cells are attacking an animal with a nervous system and exist on roughly … Continue reading →
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4:43 PM | Factsheet of the month: December – Management of white stem borer of coffee
The white stem borer, also known as Seto Gavaro, is a major pest of coffee in Nepal. In fact, the government and industry hold the pest largely responsible for the drop in production between mid-2012 and mid-2013. Coffee is a major cash crop in Nepal so it is important that farmers do not lose yield to […]
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4:25 PM | Do communities exist? Complex patterns of overlapping marine species distributions
Leaper et al. 2014 Do communities exist? Complex patterns of overlapping marine species distributions. Ecology 95:2016–2025 I picked this paper because I felt it was a more stats-y/empirical-y way at getting at some old debates in ecology. The methods seem both very complex and very simple at the same time; if you’re interested, skim the Dunstan paper(s) they […]
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3:15 PM | Building resillience to extreme weather
Between 1980 and 2004, extreme weather cost the world a […]
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2:15 PM | What reference manager is the best option?
Managing references can be a major pain in the butt. It’s one of the more annoying parts assembling a manuscript, especially when you have to reformat after a rejection. So, what’s the most efficient way of managing references for a manuscript? Some of the options people use are BibTeX, Endnote, Mendeley, Papers, Reference Manager, Zotero. Or you could just keep…
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11:21 AM | What sort of papers win the Mercer Award?
The deadline for submitting nominations for the Ecological Society of America’s various awards is Dec. 15. Details of the awards and how to submit nominations are here. Nominating someone for an award is a great way to honor deserving work … Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | Compensatory evolution: a possible mechanism of population divergence
After spending my graduate career using genetic data to reconstruct historical demographic events, one of the things that excite me the most about my postdoc work is the opportunity to use experimental methods to make evolution happen (insert mad scientist laugh … Continue reading →
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4:16 AM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (November 28th, 2014)
    A reminder that if you are planning on doing any shopping on Amazon (like on Cyber Monday or in advance of the holidays), consider getting to the site by following this link. Amazon will send me a small percentage from any sales. As always, this blog is advertisement-free.     We have a lot of catching up to do. Snakes:  On the Cottonmouth called Preacher Killer and getting to know the
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2:14 AM | #bakeyourstudyorganism
Surprisingly, Meg has never made Daphnia cookies–until now! It's not perfect, Jeremy @DynamicEcology, but here's a Daphnia cookie. (Some hippos, too) pic.twitter.com/dwjA2llFnC — Meghan Duffy (@duffy_ma) November 30, 2014 She made my study organism too. This is clearly a Colpidium … Continue reading →
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12:28 AM | A surprising twist
When you work in a science centre, you tend to become quite familiar with all these interesting phenomena one gets to experience in a good hands-on exhibition. So when we make a new discovery, we tend to get all the more excited. That happened to me when I visited the Exploratorium in San Francisco a… Continue reading »
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12:01 AM | The Sinai Hairstreak: rarer than the Giant Panda and the Snow Leopard
In 2010 I graduated from the Department of Zoology in Trinity College Dublin. I spent the next year travelling and completing any wildlife related internship or voluntary position I could get my hands on. I soon faced a dilemma; should I follow in the footsteps of my friends in academia and find a PhD or should I keep searching for a conservation job? I really didn’t know if academia was for me but I knew it would be a great advantage if I wanted to make any kind of an impact in the […]

November 30, 2014

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10:56 PM | Lakes turning to jelly
Our latest paper in the Proceedings of the Royal Society on the “jellification” of temperate lakes has gotten an impressive amount of on-line attention.  At the time of writing this blog, Altmetric scores it as the 22nd highest ranking paper ever published in the journal.  You can read summaries from the Washington Post, New York Times, […]
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10:00 PM | New Report Shows Colombian Biodiversity Endangered by Humans
The human impact has many facets, but at its root is population growth. Construction, invasive species, deforestation, toxic chemicals, and greenhouse gas are all increasing along with population. Continue reading →
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