Posts

January 30, 2015

+
10:19 PM | Study: Building walkable communities can change behavior for the better
It’s not unusual for studies on community walkability to face the perplexing question of self-selection. In other words, people who already like to walk end up moving to walkable communities and so those communities naturally have higher physical activity rates. In even simpler terms, it’s about the person, not the environment. However, a new study finds that walkable community design does influence healthy behavior — even among people with no preference for walking in the […]
+
10:04 PM | Lessons in Finance for Sustaining Biological Infrastructure
Sustaining Biological Infrastructure training course, 9 […]
+
8:03 PM | You’re a neuroscientist? Let me tell you about my disease
aka what scientists really care about. Priorities, people, priorities. via stupidchewbacca
+
7:22 PM | Before They Were Scientists: Mariano Vázquez
I recently interviewed physicist Mariano Vázquez. From his office in Barcelona, Spain, Mariano told me about the supercomputer encased in a crystal box located in a century old church a few hundred meters away from him. Read on as this Argentina native recounts how his time spent traveling around the world in a merchant ship with his family, the giant map on his childhood bedroom wall, and the invention of his own term for “scientist” all ultimately led him to a life of […]
+
4:58 PM | Most Americans Support Action on Climate Change, Poll Finds
In a finding that could have implications for the 2016 presidential campaign, the poll also found that two-thirds of Americans say they are more likely to vote for political candidates who campaign on fighting climate change. They are less likely to vote for candidates who question or deny the science of human-caused global warming. Continue reading →
+
4:45 PM | Neanderthal neurograstronomy
There is a genetic basis to the food that we enjoy eating. Some people – which I call strange people – think cilantro has a strange, soapy taste at least partially because of a particular polymorphism in a odor receptor gene (OR6A2). The question … Continue reading →
+
2:03 PM | Vernon B. Mountcastle
Originally posted on Matteo Farinella:This month neuroscience lost one of its great masters: Vernon B. Mountcastle, who first discovered the columnar organization of the cerebral cortex. His pioneering work has been awarded many prizes and laid the foundations for a lot of contemporary research in the…
+
2:00 PM | From crocodiles to coconuts
The first plant trypanosomatids were discovered in plant tissues over 100 years ago, but we know very little about their biology, life cycle or how they have adapted to life inside plants. Jaskowska et al. (2015) provide a review of … Continue reading →
+
1:00 PM | Recommended reads #45
This video clip showing aggressive mimicry by the Persian Horned Viper is amazing. University Signs Slavic Languages Professor to Five Year, $52 Million Contract Here’s a tremendously useful Guide for Scientists on Giving Comments to Journalists. The Emu War: The machine-gunners’ dreams of point blank fire into serried masses of Emus were soon dissipated. The…
+
11:09 AM | Friday links: the one body problem, crowdsourced data analyses, and more
Also this week: a great case study of forecasting errors, how to write like Peter Adler, the paradox of post-publication review, peak Plos One, and Stuff We’re Not Linking To. Also, Meg claims that the dog Daphnia ate her homework, … Continue reading →
+
9:54 AM | New Year, New Understanding of DNA
It’s the time of year for New Year’s resolutions and improving oneself. As a scientist, there are always about a million things to do to become a better researcher, but this year my resolution, and the one I hope all our readers adopt, is to become a better science communicator. Whether this means tweeting better links or publishing more frequently, the role of communication in science can’t be overstated. You don’t have to be a researcher to engage in scientific […]
+
3:09 AM | Photo of the Week – January 29, 2015
Ok, I admit it – I’m a sucker for crab spiders. As much as I enjoy looking at prairie flowers, I enjoy them even more when there’s a crab spider lying in wait among their petals.  I must have more … Continue reading →

January 29, 2015

+
7:16 PM | Looking Back at Homemade Holiday
Find out what Earth Rangers like you had to say about the Homemade Holiday Mission!
+
3:47 PM | Open Question: Do we need a new Cosyne?
UCSD started one of the first (the first?) computational neuroscience departments. But when I started graduate school there, it was being folded into the general Neuroscience department; now it is just a specialization within the department. Why? Because we won. Because … Continue reading →
+
3:00 PM | Discordance in ancestry inference using human mtDNA and autosomes
Mitochondrial haplotypes have been used extensively over the last few decades for inference of a population structure in humans. Key findings from these studies include what has come to be known as the “Mitochondrial Eve” hypothesis (see the controversial Cann, … Continue reading →
+
1:37 PM | Study: Livestock Grazing on Public Lands Cost Taxpayers $1 Billion Over Past Decade
Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:Information supplied by The Center for Biological Diversity BLM’s Welfare Ranching Bedfellows come with a huge price tag… WASHINGTON— A new analysis  finds U.S. taxpayers have lost more than $1 billion…
+
11:54 AM | Which ecological and evolutionary theories are widely misunderstood even by experts?
Economics blogger Tyler Cowen recently listed prominent economic theories that are widely misunderstood even by economists. I thought it would be interesting to ask the same question for theories in ecology and evolution. Only well-known theories are candidates for this … Continue reading →
+
8:16 AM | The Great, Great White Shark
Great White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) are amazing creatures. After catching a short but insightful IMAX film in The Omni-Theatre, titled ‘Great White Shark’, we now have a deeper understanding and appreciation of the creature that lurks beyond our shores. Narrated by Bill Nighy, the film dives straight into the ocean, bringing viewers on an underwater… Continue reading »

January 28, 2015

+
10:49 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
Exploring the Uberization of work; big retailers fight new OSHA injury reporting rule; Congress members introduce paid leave for federal workers; and John Boehner inadvertently makes the case for a minimum wage increase.
+
10:21 PM | ESA Policy News January 28: State of the Union, Senate votes on climate science, NMFS releases climate strategy
Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
+
9:30 PM | Eco-Evo conservation of Arctic biodiversity
The snow is falling and we just measured winds clocking at over 100km/h. Par for the course, you might think, for the region of Nunavut close to the community of Cambridge Bay where we are sampling for Arctic char. Except it’s August 23rd and we didn't really plan for a wind/snow storm. An elder with us says he’s never seen anything like it in August. We’re about 85km from the closest town, in the middle of the tundra, and our kitchen tent where we usually huddle over a warm […]
+
8:44 PM | How well do we understand how people make choices? Place a bet on your favorite theory
Put your money where your mouth is, as they say: The goal of this competition is to facilitate the derivation of models that can capture the classical choice anomalies (including Allais, St. Petersburg, and Ellsberg paradoxes, and loss aversion) and … Continue reading →
+
6:32 PM | Something really, really terrible is about to happen to our coral
Overall, the oceans' waters have warmed so much in recent years that most coral areas are "right on the verge of having enough heat stress to cause bleaching and it doesn't take nearly as much to start one of these global-scale events. Continue reading →
+
6:23 PM | Keystone, Meet The Grouse Wars
WASHINGTON –- The fight over the Keystone XL pipeline is about to become a fight over the lesser prairie chicken as well. Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kansas) is seeking to attach an amendment to legislation authorizing construction of the pipeline t… … Continue reading →
+
6:07 PM | Dwarf Boas
This post will soon become available in Spanish!Este post pronto estará disponible en español!Ambergris Cay Dwarf Boa (Tropidophis g. greenwayi)Now that the USA and Cuba are finally warming up to one another after a chilly fifty years, we might be poised to learn a lot more about a really interesting group of snakes that reach their highest diversity on Cuba. These are the tropidophiids, or "dwarf boas". Their name is a little misleading—like the splitjaw snakes, they […]
+
6:00 PM | “Growing Place” Revisited: After 12 Years, Children’s Activity in the School Biotope Project
There has been a rapid decrease in the amount of open or natural space in Japan in recent years, particularly in urban areas due to the development of housing. Preserving these areas as wildlife habitats and spaces where children can play is a very important issue nowadays. I wrote about the creation of a school … Continue reading “Growing Place” Revisited: After 12 Years, Children’s Activity in the School Biotope Project →
+
5:04 PM | Study shows challenges of restoring fracking sites
“Successful restoration is more than establishing vegetation. To restore wildlife habitat so that it is self-renewing, it is critical that soils are returned to a healthy status as quickly as possible,” said the study’s lead scientist, Tamera Minnick, Professor of Environmental Science at Colorado Mesa University. Continue reading →
+
4:31 PM | Why we need animal models
mod·el ˈmädl noun 1. a three-dimensional representation of a person or thing or of a proposed structure, typically on a smaller scale than the original. 2. a system or thing used as an example to follow or imitate. 3. a person, typically a … Continue reading →
+
4:23 PM | Take the active learning challenge
Dear Instructors, Here’s your challenge: Include active learning activities in every lecture. Just do it. Active learning is a philosophy and approach in which teaching moves beyond the ‘podium-style’ lecture and directly includes students in the learning process. There is certainly a big movement out there to include active learning in the classroom, there is […]
+
4:00 PM | Estimating the ticks and tocks of molecular clocks
Like many undergraduate students, I learned about the linear, universal molecular clock: the homogeneous rate of nucleotide change over time. When I sat down to actually do analyses of molecular data, I was confounded by the array of options to treat DNA … Continue reading →
123456789
309 Results