Posts

August 01, 2014

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9:43 PM | The Disgusting Reason African Elephants May Be Extinct By 2020
Chopsticks, hair pins, pendants, trinkets: These are why African elephants are dying in droves. In 2013, more than 35,000 elephants across Africa were killed for their ivory, which is often carved and sold as ornaments, jewelry and other gift items. … Continue reading →
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2:45 PM | Fun Science FRIEDay – One microbial trash is another’s microbial treasure!
Happy FSF! You know that old saying, the one that explains how something devalued by one person is of the utmost value to another. Well this week we bring you an analogy of that quote in nature, and in the form of microbes. Leishmaniasis… have you heard of it? If not, do not worry, I […]
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2:20 PM | Air France, Stop Transporting Primates
In 2012, U. S. laboratories reported using nearly 30,000 nonhuman primates in research involving pain and distress, representing 45 percent of the total number of primates used in labs that year. Further, over 1,200 of those primates were reported as having been used in experiments involving unalleviated pain and distress. Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Plant a tree, save a life
Air pollution is a serious problem in the United States. As a young child growing up in suburban Los Angeles, I remember days in which we were not allowed to play outside because of the air quality. Kids in other states had snow days, or so I was led to believe, but we had smog
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (August 1st, 2014)
Count the number of errors in this story about a dead Whale Shark. Now count the dumb stuff in this article about killing a snake. Speaking of dumb stuff, the Discovery Channel creates hoax to promote Shark Week and tricks people into thinking there is a shark in Lake Ontario. Wildlife cams are increasing in number and allow the public an intimate view of wildlife. But, how is
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11:48 AM | Photo of the Week – August 1, 2014
A couple weeks ago, I was walking around in my family’s prairie and spotted this tiny silhouette.  The morning sun was shining through the leaves of a stiff goldenrod plant and a fly was (apparently) warming itself in those rays. … Continue reading →
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8:00 AM | My interview for notable University of Plymouth alumni
My interview for notable University of Plymouth alumni: Check out my interview about careers in...
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5:27 AM | Who benefits from the ivory-trade ban?
The Foreign Affairs select committee has come out backing the international ban on trade in elephant ivory. “In particular, it should push for the resumption of a full ban on the sale of ivory that was established by the convention in 1989.” This is a reference to the uplisting of the African elephant to Appendix [...]
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12:50 AM | Stop South African Mine That Threatens Rhino Sanctuary – The Petition Site
A proposed mine in South Africa poses serious risks to rhinos. It would not only give poachers easier access to the animals, but the mine’s toxic byproducts would threaten their health. The Hluhluwe-Imfolozi park in KwaZulu-Natal became the southern white rhinos’ last refuge after it was hunted to near extinction in the 1890s. Now the high demand for rhino horns - fueled by Vietnamese and Chinese markets - has led to huge incentives to poach and a dramatic increase in rhino […]

July 31, 2014

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11:18 PM | White Rhino Poached in Kruger Park
A male white rhino has been poached in the Kingfisher Section of the Kruger National Park (KNP). Continue reading →
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10:38 PM | Exceptional Drought Blankets 58 Percent of California
Previous week’s values of 36 percent exceptional drought coverage rocketed to 58 percent in just one week. Exceptional drought is the highest drought category for the US Drought Monitor, representing the most extreme conditions in the measure. So most of the state is now sweltering under the nation’s worst drought category with the remainder covered by extreme and severe drought: Continue reading →
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10:10 PM | Connecting the Town and Gown: Cooperative Extension
Over the last few months, I’ve seen a few efforts proposed to better connect universities to local community research needs. While whole practices and skill sets around participatory action research, community-based research, etc., exist, these don’t quite meet the need these recent proposals attempt to address. These proposals are not talking one faculty research program implementing […]
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9:59 PM | Does NASA’s Data Show Doomsday for New York City?
If we don’t do something quick to stop global warming, some of the biggest cities in America could go the way of Atlantis in just a matter of decades. Source: www.truth-out.org Definitely a worst case projection.Filed under: Nature Conservation
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9:50 PM | Are Siberia’s methane blow-holes the first warning sign of unstoppable climate change?
WHAT do three enormous craters in the Siberian wastelands have to do with a terrified American climate scientist? Methane. And that’s something to scare us all. Source: www.news.com.au The close views of the surroundings suggest that this was a blast, … Continue reading →
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7:06 PM | Forget the war for biodiversity, it’s just war.
A contributed essay from Professor Rosaleen Duffy, Professor of Political Ecology of Development, SOAS, University of London. Conservationists are facing some difficult and critically important choices over how to conserve elephants and rhinos in the wake of a rapid rise … Continue reading →
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4:03 PM | Ecologists underestimating impacts of old-growth logging
Ecologists may be underestimating the impact of logging in old-growth tropical forests by failing to account for subtleties in how different animal groups respond to the intensity of timber extraction, argues a paper published today in the journal Current Biology. The study, led by Zuzana Burivalova of ETH Zurich, is based on a meta-analysis of 48 studies that evaluated the impact of selective logging on mammals, birds, amphibians, and invertebrates in tropical forests.
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2:41 PM | Biohackers Are Growing Real Cheese In A Lab, No Cow Needed
Real vegan cheese. It’s not an oxymoron, it’s a miracle of synthetic biology. Source: www.fastcoexist.com Genetic engineering on a small budget with a super goal. Filed under: Nature Conservation
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2:32 PM | Scientists discover vast methane plumes escaping from Arctic seafloor | EarthSky.org
“We are sniffing methane. We see the bubbles on video from the camera … All analysis tells the signs. We are in a mega flare.” Source: earthsky.org The significance of the mega flare is uncertain.  The research team is working … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Attack of the killer dolphins
Ah, dolphins. So sweet, so playful, so… vicious? Yes, bottlenose dolphins have been known to kill harbor porpoises when the two species’ paths cross. Off the coast of California, warmer waters triggered by El Nino have allowed the dolphins to creep farther north into the porpoises’ territory. From 2007-2009, researchers saw 23 bottlenose dolphins attacking
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12:53 PM | Seeking justice for Corazón: jaguar killings test the conservation movement in Mexico
Eight years ago, a female jaguar cub was caught on film by a motion-triggered camera trap set in the foothills of canyons, oak forest, and scrubland that make-up the Northern Jaguar Reserve, just 125 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border. Three years later, in 2009, the jaguar reappeared on film as an adult. They called her 'Corazón' for the distinctive heart-shaped spot on her left shoulder.
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12:30 PM | The Walrus as you Never Knew Him
Conrad Gessner's Walrus. 1558. Historia Animalium. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/42165842Conrad Gessner desired to reconcile ancient knowledge about the animal kingdom with the modern discoveries of the Renaissance. This endeavor spurred him to produce his magnificent Historia Animalium, a work synonymous with the beginning of modern zoology. This five-volume masterpiece covered the subjects of "live-bearing four footed animals" (mammals), "egg-laying quadrupeds" (crocodiles and lizards), […]
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9:32 AM | Vampire Squid from E/V Nautilus in the Gulf of...
Vampire Squid from E/V Nautilus in the Gulf of Mexico "Here’s video of the vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) encountered by Nautilus Live on June 27, 2014, in the Gulf of Mexico. This deep-sea cephalopod gets its name because of its deep color and red eyes, not because it feeds on blood.” Original post.
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6:49 AM | blondeisawesome: A wave viewed from underwater
blondeisawesome: A wave viewed from underwater
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4:07 AM | Curious minds
The opening page of newly developed National Strategic Plan for Science in Society states: “Science literacy is fundamentally important to the future of young New Zealanders”. I’d change that to […]
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1:36 AM | The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Updates
Rapid response to any wildlife emergency is vital in determining the ultimate outcome of any mission.  Every week the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust/Kenya Wildlife Service field teams operating within the greater Tsavo Conservation Area are tasked with the huge responsibility … Continue reading →
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12:26 AM | Deer at Coldwater Farm
We have two new fawns! Continue reading →

July 30, 2014

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10:47 PM | Wind Energy Now Cheaper than Coal
“Wind power today is cheaper than other forms of energy, not least because of a big commitment and professionalism in the field. This is true both for researchers, companies and politicians.” Continue reading →
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6:00 PM | The world's best mother: meet the octopus that guards its eggs for over four years
The ultimate goal of all species on the planet is procreation, the act of making anew. But few mothers could contend with a deep-sea octopus, known as Graneledone boreopacifica, which researchers have recently observed guarding its eggs for four-and-a-half years (53 months), before likely succumbing to starvation soon after.
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5:05 PM | The future of tropical biology research and conservation
Last week, the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) held its 51st annual meeting in Cairns, Australia. In addition to the normal symposia, plenaries, and poster sessions on a wide range of conservation topics, the convening produced a declaration calling for stronger protection of the Great Barrier Reef and two resolutions on expanding research funding in Papua New Guinea and >imploring Australia to restore its environmental leadership.
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2:22 PM | A Positive Cycle for Conservation in Ireland
Liam Lysaght, the director of the The National Biodiversity Data Centre (an organisation that collects  and manages data relating to Ireland’s biodiversity) based in Waterford, is about to embark on a one month adventure cycling around Ireland to take in some of the … Continue reading →
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