Posts

September 14, 2014

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12:08 AM | Useless Creatures (and Why They Matter)
Originally posted on strange behaviors:(Illustration: Chloé Poizat) My latest for The New York Times: This article contains no useful information. Zero. Nada. Nothing. If usefulness is your criterion for reading, thank you very much for your time and goodbye,…
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12:00 AM | Photo

September 13, 2014

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10:32 PM | Vulnerability of biodiversity hotspots to invasive species and climate change
Cclose monitoring is now required to evaluate the biodiversity responses to invasive species and climate change and to test this study projections against observations. Continue reading →
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7:17 PM | Is Climate Progress Illegal?
An international climate agreement appears to be effectively impossible in the near term. But, as Naomi Klein explains, most local legislation is illegal in the absence of an international agreement, according the the WTO. This is a problem. [more]

September 12, 2014

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4:07 PM | Monarchs and milkweed: Probing the plant, pollinator partnership
Learning more about the monarch-milkweed relationship. Continue reading →
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4:06 PM | Call for greater protection of endangered lynx in the US
New rules reduce rare wild cats critical habitat despite extending legal protection in 48 states. Continue reading →
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3:50 PM | Urban wildlife in pictures
Bristol-based photographer Sam Hobson portrays wildlife in British cities, from lapwings on a Manchester roof to fallow deer feeding by a London bus stop. Source: www.theguardian.comFiled under: Nature Conservation
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1:06 PM | Photo of the Week – September 12, 2014
It’s grasshopper season! By the end of summer, most grasshoppers have completed their seven or eight molts and have become adults – complete with functional wings.   Now, as we walk and drive through our prairies, these fully-formed adult grasshoppers … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Sharks prefer healthy reefs, healthy reefs need sharks
Stop fishing, and there will be more fish. That’s the idea, at least. Indeed, sharks were more abundant in no-fishing zones in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) than in spots where fishing is allowed according to a new study just published by a group of Australian researchers. But the story is actually more
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (September 12th, 2014)
My latest for Slate: why I gave mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a turtle. This turtle CPR also got some coverage on The Dodo. I've been asked for my comment on a few different news/research stories lately. For example, here I am in National Geographic: Do female turtles "talk" to their hatchlings? And again for: Fish and eels team up to go hunting together. Finally,
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11:36 AM | My productive week started off talking about Ecotourism with a...
My productive week started off talking about Ecotourism with a full house of students from Ateneo Universiry Environmental Science Society. Thanks for the great turn out guys!
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8:00 AM | thatfishkid: A slender mola washed up at the research station...
thatfishkid: A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family.  This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg!  That is a
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1:46 AM | #Biodiversity in the #balance, how is it #maintained?
Evolutionary theory and ecology have been brought together to explore one of the big questions in ecology: How is biodiversity developed and maintained? “This is a fundamental question if we want to protect biodiversity — what exactly do we need … Continue reading →
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1:45 AM | Lessons from the Field: Learning to Live with Wildlife
Living in the non-stop hustle and bustle of Washington, DC, I rarely get the chance to see the wildlife and habitats that we work so hard to protect. I recently got that chance. In addition, I met some of our … Continue reading →
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1:30 AM | Shark Cull Dead In The Water
Shark Cull Dead In The Water:   "In an announcement this afternoon, Environmental Protection...

September 11, 2014

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9:23 PM | Illegal tropical deforestation driven globally by “agro-conversion”
Nearly 50 percent of tropical deforestation to make room for commercial agriculture between 2000 and 2012 was done so illegally. That’s a key finding of a report published by the U.S.-based nonprofit organization Forest Trends looking at the global tide of tropical forest “agro-conversion.”
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4:35 PM | Meet the newest enemy to India's wildlife
A boom in infrastructure and population has forced India's wildlife to eke out a creative existence in an increasingly human-modified environment. Big cats such as the leopard are often spotted within large cities, on railway tracks, and sadly, on India's burgeoning and sprawling road network.
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3:26 PM | Next big idea in forest conservation? Harness the power of marketing
As a whole, conservationists have been slow to adapt the strategies of marketing or to market conservation at all. Dr. Diogo Veríssimo, a researcher who works at the interface between social and natural sciences, with a focus on behavior change and evidence-based conservation, thinks this needs to change.
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1:00 PM | Improving your diet could increase your carbon footprint
It’s a message we hear over and over: Eat more fruits and vegetables, and cut back on sugar and fat. But adopting a healthier diet could have some unintended consequences. According to a new study, switching from a typical American diet to one recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) would increase food-related greenhouse
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12:30 PM | BHL Valued by Historians
Many people tend to think of BHL as a resource for scientists. While it’s true that scientists use BHL to find species descriptions and data about earth’s flora and fauna, they are not the exclusive beneficiaries of this wealth of knowledge.BHL contains more than half a millennia's worth of records about the discovery of life on our planet. It is valuable both for the raw data it provides and for the context and history it relates. It is not just a repository of biodiversity […]
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11:37 AM | Snorkel Mantis loves snorkel.
Snorkel Mantis loves snorkel.
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8:00 AM | realmonstrosities: Japetella is a genus containing one or two...
realmonstrosities: Japetella is a genus containing one or two species of entirely pelagic octopods. They spend their whole life swimming in the ocean’s mesopelagic zone, surrounded by twilight gloom. They tend to be entirely transparent so that they cast no shadow that could be seen by sharp-eyed predators. But when bioluminescence strikes them, they instantly become a red-brown colour so as to disappear into the darkness. In happier times, females develop a ring of photophores around […]

September 10, 2014

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10:18 PM | Vanishing Louisiana
Brett Anderson recommends updating the iconic shape of the Louisiana cutout map. [more]
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10:09 PM | Readers Write In: 'Tis the Season For Baby Snakes, What Are They?
I'm enclosing photos of a baby snake and an uncovered nest of snake eggs. I hope you can easily identify the snake from my photos.  I live in Northwest NC, (Traphill) about 5 miles West of Stone Mountain State Park. We live on a 40 acre wooded lot with a small stream nearby. The nest of eggs was about 1 or 2 inches below the ground. I uncovered the eggs while digging up weeds in my back yard
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7:45 PM | Bolivian vice president proposes unprecedented agricultural expansion (PART 1)
On August 14, the Bolivian Vice President, Alvaro Garcia Linera, made a startling announcement: by 2025, Bolivia was going to make two striking developments - first, it would expand all cultivated land to 2.5 times its present area, and second, it would triple food production from 15 to 45 million tons.
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12:00 PM | California blue whales are back to pre-whaling levels
Conservation science is an endless cycle of hope and despair. But there’s a little bit more hope now, because blue whales off the coast of California appear to be doing quite well: they’ve recovered, it appears, from a century of systematic whaling. Between 1905 and 1971, almost ten thousand individual blue whales were harvested from
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4:31 AM | How you can help support Southern Fried Science
Earlier this summer, we switched funding models from an ad hoc Paypal-based donation system to Patreon, a crowdfunding style service for authors, musicians, writers, and, thanks to us, scientists. Thanks to our wonderful Patrons, Southern Fried Science is, for the first time in history, financially sustainable. We’re still growing. As many of you witnessed during […]

September 09, 2014

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1:00 PM | Marine reserves benefit only badly managed fisheries
When you’re close to hitting bottom, there’s a whole lot more room for success. This appears true with regard to a long-held belief about the benefits of marine reserves, protected areas where fishing of many species is illegal: the commonly cited idea that the reserves provide spillover benefit to neighboring fisheries may only be true when
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12:48 AM | From Pine Beetles to Disappearing Glaciers, NASA Scientists Tell of “Dramatic” Planetary Changes
Recent studies show that global warming didn't stop during the past 10 years, it accelerated. "Dramatic" planetary changes are happening now. Continue reading →

September 08, 2014

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4:16 PM | Using a Tree as a Giant Diffuser for Macro Photography
I want to start by acknowledging the irony in this post.  As someone who has spent a lot of time killing trees in prairies and urging others to do the same, it’s pretty funny that this post is all about the … Continue reading →
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