Posts

October 27, 2014

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3:32 PM | Photos: slumbering lions win top photo prize
The king of beasts took this year's top prize in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, which is co-owned by the Natural History Museum (London) and the BBC. The photo, of female lions and their cubs resting on a rock face in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, was taken by Michael 'Nick' Nichols, a photographer with National Geographic.
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2:39 PM | Gooood moooorrnnniing Viet Nam! You’re crazy and I love...
Gooood moooorrnnniing Viet Nam! You’re crazy and I love you already!
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1:00 PM | Monsters Are Real…
They just look a little different in the light of day. “HIC SUNT DRACONES.”This phrase translates from the Latin as “here are dragons.” It is etched on the eastern coast of Asia on one of the oldest terrestrial globe maps, the Lenox Globe, dating to 1510.Though the phrase itself is found on only one other historical artifact, a 1504 globe crafted on an ostrich egg, the depiction of monsters and mythological beasts are common on early maps. They crop up most commonly […]
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12:56 PM | LANDSCAPE EXPERIENCES MAJOR SHIFTS IN APPEARANCE OVER SHORT TIME SPAN
As I was preparing to post this blog, I received the latest installment of Ian Lunt’s blog, which gives very good advice to science bloggers about how to capture and hold an audience’s attention.  Ironically, I’d just been worrying that … Continue reading →
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8:11 AM | The Second American Revolution Is Brewing in Oregon
In Oregon, the capture of local government by the timber industry results in the destruction of the natural world and the poisoning of the populace, but a Josephine County ballot initiative would ban tree spraying by corporations and government entities. Continue reading →
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1:46 AM | Parrots Over Puerto Rico: An Illustrated Children’s Book Celebrating the Spirit of Conservation
Will the Puerto Rican parrot survive? It is the only remaining native parrot in Puerto Rico. Parrots of the region began disappearing in the 1700's due to logging, farming, and pet collecting. The species' prospects have improved, but the World Conservation Union still lists it as critically endangered. Continue reading →

October 26, 2014

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10:13 PM | Feds launch ocean biodiversity monitoring network
Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:A pelican perches along the coast in Englewood, Florida. Florida, California and Alaska sites will host pilot phase of research effort Staff Report FRISCO — Federal agencies are launching an ambitious $17 million…
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5:13 AM | On the Otago Peninsula
I visited Dunedin on Friday and Saturday this week.  Friday was the very academic part of the trip.  I presented a seminar at the University of Otago on the elephant-ivory black-market.  One showed how shipping costs, African instability and interest rates affected poaching and smuggling levels.  The other was a paper I hope to submit [...]

October 24, 2014

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4:25 PM | There Will Be Blood
The pressure to reach for a gun to help save one animal from another is stronger than ever. And it has triggered a conservation problem from hell.
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4:24 PM | The Future Will Not Be Dry
The most resilient cities aren't the ones that fight the water back—but the ones that absorb it.
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4:22 PM | Please Step Out of Your Car
With imaginative, green ways of getting around the city, cars may finally go the way of the horse and buggy.
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4:20 PM | DIY Glaciers
In a desert 13,000 feet above sea level, a remarkable man is taking on the global warming challenge—and winning.
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4:20 PM | Add a Few Species. Pull Down the Fences. Step Back.
Brandom Keim reviews George Monbiot's Feral
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4:19 PM | Our Changing Seas
Tiny marine organisms painstakingly build expansive coral reefs, one tiny piece of calcium carbonate at a time. Sculptor and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison mimics that process, patiently handcrafting reef pieces one by one, shaping and texturing them with simple tools such as chopsticks, and assembling them into complex colonies. Mattison has constructed a series of
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4:14 PM | Reality Is Too Confining
We know that nature experiences can change environmental behavior—but it turns out those experiences don’t have to be real.
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4:13 PM | Bug Art
Steven Kutcher is an artist, an entomologist, a teacher—and a Hollywood bug wrangler. Kutcher got his start in bug art in the 1980s when he was asked to figure out how to make a fly walk through ink and leave footprints for a Steven Spielberg–directed TV project. From there he went on to work with
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4:12 PM | Who’s Afraid Now?
In predator-human conflicts, the thing we have to fear most is fear itself
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4:11 PM | The Interspecies Internet
Why restrict the Web to one species?
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1:19 PM | Building robots in Papua New Guinea: update from #ROV2PNG
Hello from the warm, sunny island of Nago, home of the National Fisheries College field station and staging ground for Marine Ecology via Remote Observation, part of the Marine Science Short Course. My team and I arrived in Port Morseby on Friday, where we met with Jamie on her way home and and caught up […]
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1:00 PM | Your life on earth
Your life on earth: How you and the world have changed since you were born Put your life into...

October 23, 2014

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7:59 PM | Photo of the Week – October 23, 2014
I needed a walk in the prairie the other evening.  There are times when I just need to change focus and think about something besides my own life, and hiking through a grassland is the perfect tonic. Our family prairie … Continue reading →
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2:45 PM | Next big idea in forest conservation? Recognize the value of novel forests
Think first before you eradicate non-native species says Dr. Ariel E. Lugo, the current director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry within the USDA Forest Service, based in Puerto Rico. Lugo, an accomplished ecologist, supports the idea that both native and non-native plants have important roles to play in conservation efforts.
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2:00 PM | How climate change is transforming winter birds
If you’ve noticed some new birds flitting around your backyard feeder, you’re probably not alone. Scientists have found that winter bird communities in eastern North America are shifting, thanks partly to climate change. Species that typically prefer warmer weather, such as chipping sparrows, Carolina wrens, and eastern bluebirds, are advancing north. The team analyzed data
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12:30 PM | BHL Adds the National Library Board, Singapore as a New Member
Oriental Scops Owl, a species found in South Asia, including Singapore. A History of the Birds of Ceylon. v. 1. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37019175BHL is pleased to welcome the National Library Board, Singapore as a new member in BHL Central and simultaneously as BHL-Singapore, the newest node in Global BHL. The 16th member of the BHL Central consortium, BHL Singapore will help identify and digitize historical science literature from its collections and add these to the […]
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