Posts

November 01, 2014

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4:56 AM | QOTW: Berman
People always ask me one question all the time: ‘How do I know that I won’t be found out as a supporter of what you’re doing?’ We run all of this stuff through nonprofit organizations that are insulated from having to disclose donors. There is total anonymity. People don’t know who supports us. [more]
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4:52 AM | Excellent Interview with Michael Mann
An hour, and very much worth your time.
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12:40 AM | 38 federal agencies reveal their vulnerabilities to climate change — and what they’re doing about it
Or as the president's initial 2009 executive order on climate change put it: "In order to create a clean energy economy that will increase our Nation's prosperity, promote energy security, protect the interests of taxpayers, and safeguard the health of our environment, the Federal Government must lead by example." Continue reading →

October 31, 2014

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11:59 PM | Birth Control Enters Mainstream Concern
Reducing the human population by encouraging birth control will take generations. In the short term (like in the next five years), we must drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and we must gain control over land use practices. Continue reading →
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11:26 PM | Big Coal Dumps on Wildlife in a Biological Motherlode
How do mining companies get away with it? The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) requires miners to certify that these sites have undergone restoration and reclamation. The sites in this study were mined in the late 1990s and certified as “reclaimed” in 2007 by the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. But all that really means, said Steven J. Price, a University of Kentucky professor and co-author of the paper, is that the mining companies “were […]
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7:10 PM | Between the Forest and the Sea: The Yarsuisuit Collective - Part II
In this multimedia piece by SRI fellow Bear Guerra, we follow Andrés de León and the Yarsuisuit collective, a group of men who grow and harvest food sustainably in the Guna mainland forest. They also run a store on the island of Ustupu that helps support their families, serving as a model for the wider community.
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1:19 PM | Pesticides-L mailing list: creating a global conversation on pesticides issues
Originally posted on The Plantwise Blog:Written by Melanie Bateman, Integrated Crop Management Adviser, CABI Switzerland As has been mentioned before in this blog, there are a staggering number of chemicals in the world – estimates go as high as…
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12:00 PM | Are biodiversity data lurking on Instagram and Flickr?
In September, a curious video on the site LiveLeak went viral. It showed an unexpected sort of cooperation among ants, in which they formed a daisy chain – each ant bit onto the rear of the ant in front of it – in order to haul a millipede back to the nest where it could
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12:00 PM | The Beautiful Monster: Mermaids
In 1492, Christopher Columbus sailed out from Spain with a mission to find a western trade route to Asia. Instead, he found a whole “New World”…and something altogether more mysterious.On January 9, 1493, near the Dominican Republic, Columbus spotted three “mermaids.” How did he describe them? “They are not as beautiful as they are painted, since in some ways they have a face like a man.”The myth of a marine human extends as far back as 5,000 BCE, when […]
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12:59 AM | Harvard Announces New Animal Advocacy Program Endowed by Bradley L. Goldberg
Said Goldberg: “Animals have rights to experience a life of respect, free from unnecessary suffering, and the animal advocacy movement needs and deserves a new generation of leaders so that progress can continue. With its long history of pioneering legal … Continue reading →
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12:27 AM | Join us to discuss democratization of science at Citizen Science 2015
At the Citizen Science Association Conference in San Jose, the Diversity and Inclusion Working Group will host a discussion and listening session about how the Association can move towards better democratization of science – where all audiences and affiliations have the opportunity to become equal partners in the process of science. Continue reading →

October 30, 2014

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10:00 PM | Photo of the Week – October 30, 2014
I’ve always had a difficult time taking pleasing landscape photos in heavy fog.  I love the way prairies and wetlands look on foggy days, but I rarely come away with a scenic photo I’m happy with.  Fortunately, I can (and … Continue reading →
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7:23 PM | Pet trade likely responsible for killer salamander fungus
As if amphibians weren't facing enough—a killer fungal disease, habitat destruction, pollution, and global warming—now scientists say that a second fungal disease could spell disaster for dozens, perhaps hundreds, of species. A new paper finds that this disease has the potential to wipe out salamanders and newts across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Americas.
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5:00 PM | The Octopus…The Monster that Isn’t
“…A very formidable animal, and possess[ing] such a degree of strength as to make it dangerous to attack it without great precaution. Such is the ferocity and violence with which it defends itself, that even the strongest Mastiff can hardly subdue it without a long and doubtful contest. It has even been known to attack a person while swimming, and to fasten itself with dangerous force round the body and limbs.”Such a description conjures up images of a great behemoth, perhaps […]
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3:16 PM | The Search for Lost Frogs: one of conservation's most exciting expeditions comes to life in new book
One of the most exciting conservation initiatives in recent years was the Search for Lost Frogs in 2010. The brainchild of scientist, photographer, and frog-lover, Robin Moore, the initiative brought a sense of hope—and excitement—to a whole group of animals often ignored by the global public—and media outlets. Now, Moore has written a fascinating account of the expedition: In Search of Lost Frogs.
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1:44 PM | U.S. mulls adding turtles to endangered species list
The U.S. government has proposed adding four types of freshwater turtles to an international endangered species list, in part to better monitor exports of the species Continue reading →
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1:09 PM | Winter Finch Forecast: Help Monitor Wild Bird Health
Birds, like butterflies, are excellent indicators of ecosystem health. Join the Cornell Lab of Ornithology FeederWatch project beginning November 8, 2014, and make a contribution. Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Beavers help out young frogs
Beavers are a boon to the environment: Their dams create ponds that provide homes for birds, amphibians, and other critters. Now scientists have found that beavers also aid their wetland companions by digging canals that young frogs use to hop from ponds to forests. The canals, which allow beavers to transport branches and hide from
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12:00 PM | Release the Kraken!
“Architeuthis, the giant squid, is the quintessential sea monster, probably responsible for more myths, fables, fantasies, and fictions than all other marine monsters combined…[It] surely is the most remarkable unscheduled arrival in the history of zoology, crypto or otherwise. An animal that was believed by many to be mythological verified its existence…” (Ellis, 122, 133-34). Science knows it by the name Architeuthis dux. For centuries, however, it was known by […]
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7:18 AM | Inside the Mysterious World of Carnivorous Plants (Part 1—Pitfall Traps)
Plants are boring. At least that is what I—as well as countless others—thought in school. Animals seemed far more exciting than studying plants. In hindsight, I wonder why I didn’t find plants interesting. One of the reasons was that I couldn’t see plants moving—with the exception of ‘touch-me-nots’ that rapidly fold inward upon touching—and they […]

October 29, 2014

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6:56 PM | More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year
The United States National Marine Fisheries Service just released the 2013 “fisheries of the United States” report. The extremely detailed report contains lots of important information on both recreational and commercial fisheries in U.S. waters, and I recommend giving it a thorough read. I noticed an interesting detail about the U.S. shark fishery, though. In 2013, more large (non-dogfish) sharks […]
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2:44 PM | Nudibranchs of Papua New Guinea by Dustin Adamson I died and...
Nudibranchs of Papua New Guinea by Dustin Adamson I died and this was my heaven.
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1:46 PM | The greater good: animal welfare vs. conservation
Andrew Wright is a British marine biologist that has been working on the science-policy boundary around the world for over a decade. His experiences have led him to champion a better communication of science to policy makers and the lay public. His research has included a population viability analysis for the vaquita, sperm whales bioacoustics […]
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12:11 PM | This baller had a portable karaoke machine, rolling down the...
This baller had a portable karaoke machine, rolling down the street doing his thang. Our waiter took one look at our reaction of awe and shrugged his shoulders saying “This just Vietnam”. I freaking love this place.
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12:00 PM | Lizards’ feet adapt rapidly following ecological changes
Evolution is an experiment played over millions of years, with endless failures, dead-ends, obstacles, impasses, and the occasional success. Species come and species go, wiped out by disaster, drought, famine, and sometimes-overzealous predators. Others simply miss out on a few too many mating opportunities, perhaps because populations of individuals are scattered too widely for potential
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12:00 PM | The Quest for the Sea Serpent: An Oarfish or Something More?
"Soe Orm." Magnus, Olaus. Historia de Gentibus Septentionalibus. 1555. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41862944.In the 16th century, the ocean was a terrifying place. Creatures of unimaginable size and ferocity stalked the waters. One such beast was Soe Orm.“A very large sea serpent of a length upwards of 200 feet and 20 feet in diameter which lives in rocks and in holes near the shore of Bergen; it comes out of its cavern only on summer nights and in fine weather to destroy calves, […]
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4:19 AM | Climate, Chaos, Confusion
A common question is "doesn't chaos theory mean you can't predict the climate"? Or sometimes, just "isn't climate chaotic"? Here I have to get very careful with language, because a few things are getting confused. There is a way of thinking about these questions that makes sense, but not everybody who talks about them knows it. [more]
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12:50 AM | Will there be a ‘hostile takeover’ of western public lands?
Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:Federal lands in the U.S. Courtesy Univ. of Montana. New website offers glimpse of ongoing efforts to ‘de-federalize’ the West Staff Report FRISCO — On and off efforts to force the transfer of…

October 28, 2014

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6:44 PM | How wolves are beneficial
Originally posted on Coalition for American Wildbirds:? ? On Utah’s National Public Radio affiliate, KCPW, on Tuesday, October 21, host Roger Mc Donough interviewed Kirk Robinson, Executive Director of Western Wildlife Conservancy on the topic of wolves – and…
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1:00 PM | Can a legal rhino horn trade really save the rhinos?
Between 1990 and 2007, poachers killed about 15 rhinoceroses each year in South Africa. An explosion in demand for rhino horn, however, has changed that number dramatically: by last year, rhinos were dying at a rate of 2.75 every day, or more than 950 for the full year. Both Southern white and black rhinoceroses are prized for
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