Posts

March 31, 2015

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4:49 PM | Other Flowers at Coldwater Farm
Garry Rogers Coldwater Farm Flowers Click here for other photo sets.Filed under: Coldwater Farm, Flowers, Garry Rogers, Photography Tagged: Coldwater Farm, flowers, garry-rogers, Photography
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12:30 PM | Citizen Science Uses Art to Unlock Scientific Knowledge
Citizen Science in Science GossipSince the release of Science Gossip a little less than a month ago, 3,600 volunteers have enthusiastically completed 160,000 classifications of natural history illustrations from the pages of 19th century science periodicals! As a result, the periodicals Recreative Science and Midland Naturalist are now fully classified and both the Magazine of Natural History and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology and Meteorology and the Intellectual Observer are […]
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12:00 PM | Seafloor hits bottom fast, bounces back slowly after climate change
Seafloor ecosystems are likely to take a millennium or more to recover from climate change, according to research published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That conclusion comes from an analysis of over 5,400 fossil snails, sea stars, and other invertebrates in a sediment core collected off the coast of Santa

March 30, 2015

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10:25 PM | On the bear trail
I’m back in Beijing.  In the meeting room, two large maps of China are affixed to the wall.  In theory the map describes the distribution of Asiatic black bears in China.  Most are concentrated in Sichuan province, or up near the Russian Far East (HeilongJiang, Jilin). Someone’s eye roves over the map. They spot a [...]
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8:49 PM | Climate Change vs. Conservation
Has global warming made it harder for environmentalists to care about conservation? Source: www.newyorker.com GR:  Pretty good argument that there is no hope for preserving nature on Earth so we should get over it and do the few small temporary … Continue reading →
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8:17 PM | Tuning Out and Tuning In
It had been way too long since I’d taken the kids camping.  Earlier this month, however, I managed to get two out of three of them to come with me and we had a great overnight trip to our family … Continue reading →
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7:41 PM | Farmers Fields as Nature-conservation Areas
Highly productive agriculture and the protection of biodiversity are hard to reconcile? A joint project involving BASF, farmers and agronomic experts reveals how modern farming can help to protect ecosystems. Source: www.basf.com GR:  This story is misleading.  Yes, farmers could … Continue reading →
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7:28 PM | Drought damage leads to widespread forest death
The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. Source: phys.org GR:  Die offs are occurring at lower sites too.  Substantial thinning is occurring in the pinion-juniper woodland and the interior chaparral.Filed under: … Continue reading →
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7:22 PM | Wildfire critical in calculating carbon-payback time for biomass energy projects
Accounting for wildfire is essential in achieving an accurate and realistic calculation of the carbon payback period associated with converting forest biomass into energy, according to a new study. Source: phys.org GR:  It seems to me that there are some … Continue reading →
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6:16 PM | 9 months after Amazonian oil pipeline spill, effects and fears linger
When Peru's state-run oil company pulled out of this small Kukama Indian village in mid-December after cleaning up an oil pipeline spill, residents thought life could slowly return to normal. But more than three months later, wisps of oil floating down the Cuninico River—along with a larger spill in the neighboring community of San Pedro—are a reminder that the problems are not over.
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2:20 PM | Thousands of Cormorants to be Killed: There Will be Blood
From the article: "Despite experts agreeing that killing the cormorants is wrong and won’t work, it turns out that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is planning to kill nearly 11,000 cormorants and destroy more than 26,000 of their nests to try to reduce cormorant numbers by more than half." Continue reading →
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1:38 AM | Vanishing Nature: Facing NZ’s biodiversity crisis
New Zealand’s remarkable indigenous biodiversity is fragile and in decline. The latest publication by EDS is Vanishing Nature: facing New Zealand’s biodiversity crisis . Source: www.scoop.co.nzFiled under: Biodiversity Tagged: biodiversity, Human Impact

March 29, 2015

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6:22 PM | Two Million Served: Living Alongside Wildlife is a classy and reputable online source of information, but you won’t believe what we’re going to tell you about its author --Guest Post--
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March 28, 2015

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8:04 PM | Fracking: New aerial research to track pollutants above western fossil fuel development zones
Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:Sensitive instruments to track methane, VOCs and other airborne toxins from New Mexico to North Dakota The Four Corners area (red) is the major U.S. hot spot for methane emissions in this map…
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7:32 PM | Chilean Wildfires Ravage Rare Species
The article points out that much more is spent on fighter jets than on protecting the country's natural heritage. In almost every country, our intraspecific wars and fears of war get much more attention and resources than do our wild plants and animals. We have such small brains. Continue reading →
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4:12 PM | Earth Hour 2015 Official Video – YouTube
Lights out this evening at 8:30--9:30 pm your time. Continue reading →
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11:18 AM | Venom As Medicine Won't Solve The Lionfish Invasion
The lionfish eating their way through the Atlantic and Caribbean are among the worst marine invasive species to date. Anything we can do to limit their populations is a step in the right direction, thus it's not surprising that some are getting creative when it comes to control. One of the most common questions I receive goes like this: What if there's something worthwhile in their venom? Could we convince people to hunt them in droves if we can find a medical use for their spines? It sur

March 27, 2015

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7:09 PM | Why wild giraffes are suffering a ‘silent extinction’
The iconic animals have declined 40 percent in just 15 years, a plight that has gone largely unnoticed until recently. Source: www.mnn.com GR:  This first appeared in December (2014).  Does anyone know of programs that are helping giraffes?Filed under: Extinction … Continue reading →
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6:49 PM | Monsanto Demands World Health Organization Retract Report That Says Roundup Is Linked to Cancer » EcoWatch
Monsanto is demanding the World Health Organization (WHO) retract the report that says glyphosate, found in the herbicide Roundup, is linked to cancer Source: ecowatch.com GR:  From the article:  “One proponent of the “glyphosate is absolutely safe” narrative is former environmentalist/current environmental contrarian/sometime … Continue reading →
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6:41 PM | We could stop global warming by spraying particles into the air—but it’s a very bad idea
Ken Caldeira on geoengineering. Source: www.motherjones.com “Caldeira, now a climate scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science, recently contributed to a massive National Academy of Sciences report examining various geoengineering proposals. The report concluded that technologies to block solar radiation “should … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | What's Up with Seed Catalogs in BHL?
Cole's Garden Annual. 1892. From the BHL Seed and Nursery Catalog Collection.We've spent a fun-filled week exploring the history, art, and science of gardening with our Garden Stories event. Seed and nursery catalogs and lists played a starring role in our campaign, allowing us to explore the world of gardening through the instruments that informed, documented, shaped, and transformed the industry.As our journey this week has demonstrated, seed and nursery catalogs and lists allow us to trace […]
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12:30 PM | “'Tis A Gift To Be Simple” But to Have a Splendid Garden Buy Shaker Seeds
Sabbathday Lake Shaker Community Meetinghouse  (photo by Gerda Peterich for the Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division; HAB SME,3-SAB,1—1) […]
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12:00 PM | $1.34 billion per year could save 841 endangered species
The Mount Lefo brush-furred mouse, Lophuromys eisentrauti, is a species that is simultaneously one of the most highly endangered and most likely to become extinct very soon. That’s primarily because it’s found only in one place: Mount Lefo, in western Cameroon. There’s also the Tahiti monarch Pomarea nigra, a bird from French Polynesia, and Turkey’s

March 26, 2015

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8:45 PM | Photo of the Week – March 26, 2015
Despite snide comments from certain friends, I do – now and then – take photos of subjects other than insects and plants… As I write this, the annual sandhill crane migration phenomenon is taking place on Nebraska’s Platte River.  The … Continue reading →
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6:30 PM | Forbes Billionaires Top US Welfare Ranchers List
Effective lobbying to control Congress requires lots of money. So it's no surprise that much of the subsidized rangeland is owned by the ultra rich. Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | Revolutionizing the Garden Industry with Art: Part Two
J. Horace McFarland. Pennsylvania Capitol Preservation Committee. J. Horace McFarland’s name is little known today. In the early twentieth century, however, he was a prominent figure in American horticulture and the nascent environmental movement. McFarland (1859-1948) was a master printer, horticulturist, and conservationist, whose Harrisburg, Pennsylvania printing company specialized in horticultural trade publications. He was particularly noted for his use of photographs and […]
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4:08 PM | The War on Climate Change is a Guaranteed Job Creator
Our human history is measured in a sequence of “epochs”, periods of time defined by events or advancements. Today, we are entering the epoch of climate change.  In this era, Lindsay Graham acknowledges that climate change is real and humans are causing it. Conversations finally turn away from “Do we need to do anything?” to […]
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3:32 PM | One in ten European wild bee species face extinction
There were a few bees last month when the apricot bloomed, fewer when the willows bloomed, and now nothing in the plumbs. Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | ‘Bee hotels’ have unwanted guests
It sounds like an adorable conservation idea: Create “bee hotels” where threatened native pollinators can nest and boost their numbers. These man-made abodes, which typically contain tubes or hole-riddled wood or plastic for the bees, have become popular projects among environmentally-minded folks. But these well-meaning hoteliers may not be helping native bees as much as
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12:30 PM | Revolutionizing the Garden Industry with Art: Part One
The Seed Industry Blossoms in AmericaSeventeenth and eighteenth-century America had established nurseries—George Fenwick’s in Connecticut in the 1640s, John Bartram’s in Philadelphia (approximately 1729) and Robert Prince’s on Long Island (1737)—that traded plants to and from Europe. The owners were accomplished botanists and plant collectors. They and their successors played a great role in horticulture and floriculture introductions and trends during the colonial […]
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