Posts

July 25, 2014

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10:49 PM | Invasive Plants Are Destroying North American Desert Ecosystems
Invasive plants replace native plants and degrade native ecosystems. Continue reading →
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8:43 PM | No longer 'deaf as a stump': researchers find turtles chirp, click, meow, cluck
Turtles comprise one of the oldest living groups of reptiles, with hundreds of species found throughout the world. Many have been well-researched, and scientists know very specific things about their various evolutionary histories, metabolic rates, and the ways in which their sexes are determined. But there was one very obvious thing that has been largely left unknown by science until very recently. Turtles can make sounds.
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8:15 PM | Seafood apartments and other experiments in fixing Indonesia's fisheries (Part IV)
Shrimp farms, industrial plants, and one of Indonesia's busiest thoroughfares make up Java's north coast today. It's a very different scene from the fishing villages with beachfront boat parking that stood here decades earlier. Which begs the question, where will fish live in this new 'coast without mangroves, without coral, without seagrass,' asks Alan Koropitan, a marine biologist based at Bogor Agricultural University.
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2:45 PM | Fun Science FRIEDay – All About the Benjamins Baby!
To quote the Notorious BIG, “It’s all about the Benjamins, BABY!” That quote unfortunately holds true in many walks of life, and is especially applicable to this weeks FSF where Dr. Costanza, from Australian National University, and a number of colleagues puts a price tag on the world’s natural environment. Some of you are probably […]
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12:00 PM | Less wildlife means more terrorism
The harvest of wild terrestrial and aquatic animals each year injects more than $400 billion dollars into the world economy. That harvest provides 15% of the planet’s human population with a livelihood. It’s also the primary source of animal protein for more than a billion of our species. It’s also led to piracy, slavery, and
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10:46 AM | Terrified of Twitter? Social Media for Marine Conservation
Terrified of Twitter? Social Media for Marine Conservation: How many times have you heard, or even...
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6:40 AM | Sea moth (Family Pegasidae) In honour of National Moth Week, I...
Sea moth (Family Pegasidae) In honour of National Moth Week, I give you this cutie pie - spotted in Malapascua, Philippines.
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3:19 AM | Fisheries Law Enforcement Team formed in Daanbantayan
Fisheries Law Enforcement Team formed in Daanbantayan: savephilippineseas: (Daanbantayan, Cebu—July...

July 24, 2014

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11:21 PM | Why We Need to Save Wildlife to Save Ourselves
Life on earth depends on a healthy balance of species. Continue reading →
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8:50 PM | It's not just extinction: meet defaunation
Get ready to learn a new word: defaunation. Fauna is the total collection of animals—both in terms of species diversity and abundance—in a given area. So, defaunation, much like deforestation, means the loss of animals in all its myriad forms, including extinction, extirpation, or population declines.
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7:05 PM | Desperate measures: researchers say radical approaches needed to beat extinctions
Today, in the midst of what has been termed the “Sixth Great Extinction” by many in the scientific community, humans are contributing to dizzying rates of species loss and ecosystem changes. A new analysis suggests the time may have come to start widely applying intensive, controversial methods currently used only as “last resort” strategies to save the word’s most imperiled species.
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5:15 PM | Proceeding upriver: a timeline of the dispute over estuarine lionfish
Over the past month, the story of Lauren Arrington’s sixth-grade science project on lionfish salinity tolerance has exploded. In the past week, however, questions have arisen as to the validity of her study and the events that led to her project, particularly the involvement of scientist Zachary Jud, who was rarely mentioned in early reports […]The post Proceeding upriver: a timeline of the dispute over estuarine lionfish appeared first on Science Sushi.
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4:34 PM | Next big idea in forest conservation: Reconnecting faith and forests
'In Africa, you can come across Kaya forests of coastal Kenya, customary forests in Uganda, sacred forest groves in Benin, dragon forests in The Gambia or church forests in Ethiopia...You can also come across similar forest patches in South and Southeast Asia including numerous sacred groves in India well-known for their role in conservation of biological diversity,' Dr. Shonil Bhagwat told mongabay.com.
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4:10 PM | Photo of the Week – July 24, 2014
I’m definitely a better close-up photographer than a landscape photographer.  Part of that is just the way my mind works – I tend to look down instead of up when I walk around a prairie.  I can always find an … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Pit latrines: Another source of greenhouse gas emissions
Coal plants, landfills, and cows all release methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. But in a new study, researchers have highlighted yet another source of methane emissions: the pit latrines used by about 1.8 billion people around the world. Pit latrines are crucial for sanitation in developing or rural areas without modern toilets. As the excrement
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12:00 PM | BHL Welcomes Two New Affiliate Members
We are pleased to announce that the Research Library at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the Lenhardt Library of the Chicago Botanic Garden have joined the Biodiversity Heritage Library as BHL Affiliates. The addition of these libraries not only expands BHL’s presence within the research community, but will also greatly strengthen our library through the incorporation of literature unique to these affiliates’ collections.The Research Library at the Natural […]
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11:22 AM | Photo
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1:53 AM | rhamphotheca: First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea...
rhamphotheca: First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish by Dana Lacono (August, 2012) With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book. In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea […]
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1:52 AM | griseus: A redeye gaper (Chaunax sp.) venting water at 240...
griseus: A redeye gaper (Chaunax sp.) venting water at 240 meters depth. Seen during the Lophelia II 2008 expedition at the Green Canyon site in the Gulf of Mexico. Gapers are Lophiiformes, in the anglerfish group, with big heads, a network of open sensory canals,and a lateral canal extending posteriorly along a compressed trunk and tail. They are sit-and-wait, ambush predators Video courtesy of Lophelia II 2008: Deepwater Coral Expedition: Reefs, Rigs, and Wrecks.

July 23, 2014

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4:30 PM | Prairie Ecologist Spam
Ok, this is pretty tangential, but I just have to share. One component of this blog that is hidden to everyone but me is the abundance of spam comments that show up in my queue, waiting to be approved or … Continue reading →
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3:26 PM | Deep Sea Fauna... with Googly Eyes, for science!
Deep Sea Fauna... with Googly Eyes, for science!: deepseafauna: Ifremeria nautilei and friends in...
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3:25 PM | mollishka: astron0miia: gabrielalauren: This is a seal with...
mollishka: astron0miia: gabrielalauren: This is a seal with hiccups.   You’re welcome. hahahaha awh Me Omg I know that feeling
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3:22 PM | xysciences: Coral branches retreating to protect...
xysciences: Coral branches retreating to protect themselves. [Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]
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1:59 PM | Extreme to Exceptional Drought Now Covers Over 80 Percent of California
It’s no longer a question of 100% drought coverage for the stricken state of California. That barrier was crossed months ago. Today, it’s how severe that drought coverage has become. And in a state… Source: robertscribbler.wordpress.com Excellent article.Filed under: Climate … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Using Google Trends to Gauge Climate Change Perception
Climate change is happening. There’s no question about it, despite what some news media outlets would have you believe. To mitigate or adapt to the effects of climate change, it is prudent to understand how people learn about climate-related issues in the first place. Corey Lang is a researcher in the Department of Environmental and
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12:00 PM | Readers Write In: What are these Frog-eating, Cottonmouth-looking Snakes?
1) This is the snake (on right) that started my whole concern (a five-footer that was in our yard). I've been told it was a black ratsnake. Is it?... My snake-obsessed little boy spotted a snake (second picture) on our evening walk tonight. We know it's not a copperhead or black rat snake or king snake—do you know what kind it is? It was thin and about 20 inches long. You would have been proud
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9:31 AM | "We will rock you - don’t eat shark fin" You got fins on...
"We will rock you - don’t eat shark fin" You got fins on your plate, you big disgrace Brilliant. 
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12:53 AM | How fussy pandas maintain a balanced bamboo diet
fussy-pandas-bamboo-diet Continue reading →

July 22, 2014

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6:18 PM | Over-depleted and undermanaged: can Indonesia turn around its fisheries? (Part III)
Compared to maritime ministries worldwide, Indonesia's Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) is a teenaged neophyte. The governing body was formed a mere 13 years ago;a staggering fact for a country made up of two-thirds water where many of the 250 million people depend on fish for both protein and income. Mongabay.org's SRI Fellow Melati Kaye reports on the state of Indonesian fisheries in the third installment of a four-part series.
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4:22 PM | Climate Model Shows Australia’s Rainfall Decline Due To Human-Caused Climate Change
Simulating natural and human-caused climate drivers, scientists showed that the decline in rainfall is primarily a response to human-caused increases in greenhouse gases as well as a thinning of the ozone caused by human-caused aerosol emissions. Continue reading →
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