Posts

August 01, 2014

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3:11 AM | The Cantor-Bernstein-Schröder Theorem
And whose theorem is it anyway? Georg Cantor, Felix Bernstein, and Ernst Schröder are each famous for many things. But together they are famous for stating, trying to prove, and proving, a basic theorem about the cardinality of sets. Actually the first person to prove it was none of them. Cantor had stated it in […]

July 31, 2014

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11:23 PM | Episode 266 - The Green Bathmat - 7/31/2014
This week, Will, Norm, and Jeremy discuss game subscriptions, Uber ratings, octocopters, 3D printing, the Oculus DK2, and Amazon's terrible Fire phone. Enjoy!
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9:22 PM | Goldilocks software
Aaron Evans condensed a good deal of software engineering experience down to less than 140 characters: It’s amazing how much cleaner your code looks the third time writing it. First time, hack; Second over-engineer; Third = goldilocks.
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9:20 PM | Origins of category theory terms
From Saunders MacLane: Now the discovery of ideas as general as these is chiefly the willingness to make a brash or speculative abstraction, in this case supported by the pleasure of purloining words from the philosophers: “Category” from Aristotle and Kant, “Functor’ from Carnap …, and “natural transformation” from the current informal parlance.
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5:08 PM | Premium: Assembling the Hellboy Mecha-Hand Motivator
Premium: Assembling the Hellboy Mecha-Hand Motivator
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4:49 PM | In Brief: Be Mindful of USB Security Risks
At next week's Black Hat security conference, researchers Karsten Nohl and Jakob Lell plan on presenting a demo of malicious software that shows just how fundamentally at-risk the USB protocol is for unprotected computers. Their software, called BadUSB, lives in the firmware of a USB key, not the flash memory. The researchers say that reprogrammed firmware used as malicious code can't be detected by current anti-virus software. And the scariest part may be that the BadUSB firmware can be […]
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4:28 PM | Filmmaker Casey Neistat's Box Organization System
No summary available for this post.
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4:01 PM | Nuit Blanche in Review (July 2014)
We have had quite a few new items, including my first paper published in the realm of compressive sensing since the last Nuit Blanche in Review (June 2014). We also had 11 implementations made available by their respective authors:GreBsmo: Greedy Bilateral Sketch, Completion & Smoothing - implementation -Adaptive-Rate Compressive Sensing Using Side Information - implementation -Tight convex relaxations for sparse matrix factorization - implementation -Mondrian Forests: Efficient […]
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4:00 PM | In Brief: The Origins of the "10% Brain Power" Misconception
Adam linked us to this good story on Gizmodo examining the origins of the common misconception that we only use 10% of our brains. Neuroscience and psychologists researchers in the early 20th century attempted to quantify how much of our brains (by mass) that we use for everyday activities, to find a correlation between brain mass and cognitive capacity. That line of thinking endures, as a means to explain latent cognitive potential. Of course, we actually use virtually all of our brain, and […]
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7:38 AM | Tested Builds: Quadcopter Drone, Part 4
Tested Builds: Quadcopter Drone, Part 4
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7:12 AM | CFP: Thinking, analysing and designing Expressive Games
Spread the word: International seminar   Thinking, analysing and designing Expressive Games   24-25 November 2014, METZ, FRANCE CREM / LORIA, University of Lorraine Selection Process Proposals are expected by 1st September 2014. They must be sent in the form … Continue reading →
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7:00 AM | 3D Printing on Adam Savage's Hellboy Glove Project
No summary available for this post.
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6:30 AM | GreBsmo: Greedy Bilateral Sketch, Completion & Smoothing - implementation -
In CAI: Cable And Igor's Adventures in Matrix Factorization, Cable and I used the GoDec algorithm of Tianyi Zhou to play with several Youtube videos. There are all here. Kyle Kastner did a similar undertaking using Python and IPython. it is all here.Today, we have an even faster version of GoDecin GreBsmo as featured in Greedy Bilateral Sketch, Completion & Smoothing by Tianyi Zhou, Dacheng TaoRecovering a large low-rank matrix from highly corrupted, incomplete or sparse […]
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5:00 AM | GdR ISIS: Acquisition/Echantillonnage comprimé : quelles réalisations/applications pratiques ?
One of my co-author, Laurent Daudet, asked me to features this French centered CfP (speakers do not need to be presenting in French). Here it is:Réunion du GdR ISISTitre : Acquisition/Echantillonnage comprimé : quelles réalisations/applications pratiques ?Dates : 2014-09-12Lieu : Télécom ParisTech, PARISNous vous rappelons que, afin de garantir l'accès de tous les inscrits aux salles de […]
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12:35 AM | Jamie and Adam's Comic-Con 2014 Panel
No summary available for this post.

July 30, 2014

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5:45 PM | The Fletcher Capstan Table Is an Engineering Marvel
No summary available for this post.
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5:40 PM | writing #rstats bindings for bwa-mem, my notebook.
I wanted to learn how to bind a C library to R, so I've created the following bindings for BWA. My code is available on github at :https://github.com/lindenb/rbwaMost of the C code was inspired from Heng Li's code https://github.com/lh3/bwa/blob/master/example.c. A short description of the C codeIn https://github.com/lindenb/rbwa/blob/master/rbwa.c: struct RBwaHandler This structure holds a
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2:00 PM | Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11s Review
For the past month I’ve been using my shiny new Lenovo IdeaPay Yoga 11s laptop as my main machine. My initial impression of this laptop is that it is small and understated… In fact you might be tricked into thinking it was a low powered machine based on it’s size when in fact it contains […]
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12:57 PM | [Pictures] The #RedBallProject in Galway (Ireland)
The red ball transforms the urban order. Passed through Lausanne in 2013 and a handful of other cities, the red ball was in Galway (Ireland) in July 2014. This post provides 2 x 10 pictures (+ 1 GIF) of the artwork of Kurt Perschke (@redballproject) in the streets of Galway (during the Galway International Arts Festival – @GalwayIntArts). Thank you to the Festival de la Cité  - @festivalcite (Lausanne) for giving me the opportunity […] The post […]
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10:00 AM | Trop-plein de Juillet
Un trop-plein résolument météorologique ce mois-ci : - Le régime du Soleil - Les radars météo - Pas d'été sans jeux
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9:16 AM | OverDrive: The Flying Car on Kickstarter
Over the years, I’ve learned to expect the unexpected from my friend and former NASA colleague, Fitz Walker. I’ve long been aware of his engineering and fabrication talents from projects that I have collaborated with him. Fitz has a secretive side too. The true depth and breadth of his skills always seem to be revealed through random, casual conversations: “That thing? Oh, that’s my RC submarine…I’ve been building them for years.” “What? I […]
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8:28 AM | Tested Builds: Quadcopter Drone, Part 3
Tested Builds: Quadcopter Drone, Part 3
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6:57 AM | Tested In-Depth: Android Wear LG G Watch
No summary available for this post.
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5:00 AM | Adaptive-Rate Compressive Sensing Using Side Information - implementation -
Adaptive-Rate Compressive Sensing Using Side Information by Garrett Warnell, Sourabh Bhattacharya, Rama Chellappa, Tamer BasarWe provide two novel adaptive-rate compressive sensing (CS) strategies for sparse, time-varying signals using side information. Our first method utilizes extra cross-validation measurements, and the second one exploits extra low-resolution measurements. Unlike the majority of current CS techniques, we do not assume that we know an upper bound on the number of […]

July 29, 2014

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10:25 PM | The Computer's First Song
The 1956 composition "Illiac Suite for String Quartet" is a pleasant enough sounding piece of music – for the first three movements, that is. It's when you get to the fourth and final movement, that things get...weird. The notes sound random and dissonant. It doesn't sound much like music at all. But the peculiarity of "Illiac Suite" makes a little more sense when you realize how it was composed. This was the computer's first algorithmically generated song.Programmed in binary by Lejaren […]
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9:25 PM | Marilyn Myller, A Stop-Motion Short about Stop-Motion Animation
No summary available for this post.
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9:20 PM | In Brief: The First Conversational Robot
Last month, Robohub posted a story about the first commercial toy that could respond to voice commands. Radio Rex, a toy dog that jumped out of a doghouse when called, was made and sold in 1922, decades before the first digital computers. Apparently, surviving models of Radio Rex still work today. Rex worked off of acoustic energy: a spring attached to the toy dog released when struck by 500Hz audio--roughly the "eh" vowel sound in the dog's name. The appeal of Rex resonates today, in our […]
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9:06 PM | The Influence and Legacy of Artist H.R. Giger
It will make a great question on a game show one day: What never-released movie had ambitions to be over ten hours long, star Mick Jagger and Orson Welles, feature a screenplay by the writer of Alien, and production design by H.R. Giger? Jodorowsky’s Dune of course, and the recent documentary on this unmade epic is a remarkable effort--probably the best movie about an unmade movie I've seen yet.All filmmakers have dream projects that for one reason or another, never get made, and Dune was […]
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6:17 PM | Including the hash for the current git-commit in a C program
Say you wrote the following simple C program: It includes a file "githash.h" that would contain the hash for the current commit in Git: Because you're working with a Makefile, the file "githash.h" is generated by invoking 'git rev-parse HEAD ': the file "githash.h" loooks like this: But WAIT that is not so simple, once the file 'githash.h' has been created it won't be updated by
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4:19 PM | A simple and useable classification of software by Aral Balkan via Wuthering Bytes
It’s getting pretty hard to do anything these days that doesn’t involve software. Our governments, businesses, laboratories, personal lives and entertainment would look very different without the software that makes them tick. How can we classify all this software to make sense of it all? The likes of this huge list of software categories on wikipedia are pretty […]

Malone, J., Brown, A., Lister, A., Ison, J., Hull, D., Parkinson, H. & Stevens, R. (2014). The Software Ontology (SWO): a resource for reproducibility in biomedical data analysis, curation and digital preservation, Journal of Biomedical Semantics, 5 (1) 25. DOI: 10.1186/2041-1480-5-25

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