Posts

July 22, 2014

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9:04 PM | The falsehood of the perpetual candle
“Oh ye seekers after perpetual motion, how many vain chimeras have you pursued? Go and take your place with the alchemists.”         – Leonardo da Vinci, 1494Found in an article about a "perpetual candle" and a designer's ill-fated attempt at creating a renewable candle by recycling mass/energy. 
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7:24 PM | Microscopy charges ahead
Polarization charges in ferroelectric materials are screened by equal amounts of surface charges with opposite polarity under ambient conditions. Researchers have shown that scraping, collecting, and quantifying surface screen charges reveals the underlying polarization domain structure at high speed, a technique dubbed charge gradient microscopy (CGM).
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6:05 PM | The Summer Issue of Chemical Heritage Magazine is Here
Chemical Heritage magazine has escaped from captivity yet again. This time it has crime in mind. If you have an appetite for detective stories or obscure poisons you’ll find much to chew on.  If you’re worried about the increasingly rude conversations around scientific “controversies,” well, keep worrying. (There aren’t any simple answers.) If you want more to worry about, check out the history of Atoms for Peace or find out why depression diagnoses keep […]
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4:44 PM | Challenges of teaching Biochemistry to Health Sciences students
Had anyone told me, 20 years ago, that I would earn my living as a lecturer, I would have considered it as a put-down. I did have a lot of respect and appreciation for (most of) my lecturers at the University of Porto, but I expected to become a full-time scientist, rather than a "lecturer who finds time to do some science in-between classes/grading" or a "researcher with required part-time lecturing duties". Real life disabused me of that expectation: due to the dearth of other scientific jobs […]
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4:17 PM | Invisible Remnants of Dead Stuff Hiding in Water
Ready for a little test?  Try to list all of the things you can think of that are found in a river or lake… I’m sure you came up with things like fish, algae, dirt, plants, and many others.  But one thing found in these water bodies that you may not have thought of and […]
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4:03 PM | Quantum leap in lasers brightens future for quantum computing
Scientists have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform today's most powerful supercomputers.
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3:58 PM | Technique simplifies the creation of high-tech crystals
Researchers propose a method to create precision crystals by adding polymer to a chemical mixture.
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2:00 PM | A few words about classroom etiquette
  I’ve noticed over the past few years as electronic devices become more prevalent in our society, that students are now bringing the devices to the classroom, particularly laptop computers and smart phones. Most times these devices are welcomed into the class as professors incorporate online materials into the traditional classroom lecture. The devices are viewed as great […]
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1:36 PM | New material gives rejected drugs a new chance
More than 80 percent of all drug candidates in the pharma R+D suffer from poor solubility and are therefore rejected early in the drug discovery process. Now Uppsala University researchers show that the new material Upsalite, has great potential for development of new formulations of these rejected drugs.
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12:30 PM | Magnolia Solar Is Using Nanotechnology to Develop High-Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells
Magnolia Solar Corporation announced that it is pioneering the application of nanotechnology for both flexible CIGS and III-V solar cells in order to boost performance and lower costs.
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12:27 PM | NSF grant will further research on models of self-assembling systems
The models simulate or mimic complex biological processes, such as evolution, self-replication and immune system behaviors, and the formation of prions, protein particles that may cause brain diseases. The models can be used to help scientists develop artificial self-assembling systems in laboratories and will make valuable contributions to the theoretical understanding of biological systems.
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10:13 AM | A simple, low cost laser technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials
By drawing micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications
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9:41 AM | Open Notebook Science ONSSP #1: http://onsnetwork.org/
As promised, I slowly set out to explore ONSSPs (Open Notebook Science Service Providers). I do not have a full overview of solutions yet but found LabTrove and Open Notebook Science Network. The latter is a more clear ONSSP while the first seems to be the software.So, my first experiment is with Open Notebook Science Network (ONSN). The platform uses WordPress, a proven technology. I am not a huge fan of the set up which has a lot of features making it sometimes hard to find what you need. […]
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7:24 AM | How nanostructure geometry affects polymer photovoltaic device efficiency
Conjugated polymer based organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices have been the subject of increasing research interest over the past years due to their potential of being light weight, mechanically flexible, semitransparent. To increase the efficiency of OPV, it is necessary to achieve a precisely controlled donor-acceptor phase separation within the short exciton diffusion length without dead ends, as well as a high hole mobility within the polymer. Now, researchers have demonstrated the effects of […]
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5:38 AM | Graphene Frontiers Receives $1.6M Funding For Sensor Technology
The company announced the successful closing of $1.6 million in Series Seed B funding to finance production of cutting edge biological and chemical sensors for the life science, defense, intelligence, and environmental industries.
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5:31 AM | Ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast
At up to 150,000 revolutions per minute, these nanomotors rotate 10 times faster than any nanoscale object submerged in liquid ever reported.

July 21, 2014

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7:17 PM | Well, since you asked
I got randomly selected for an online survey about the ACS. I found this one to be a good question. 
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6:00 PM | Asylum Research Opens an Atomic Force Microscopy Demonstration Lab in Mumbai
Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces the opening of its first Nanotechnology Lab for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in India. The new lab is located at the Oxford Instruments India headquarters in Mumbai and adds to the range of industrial analysis tools available for demonstration.
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4:48 PM | The stability of gold clusters: Every ligand counts
The number of molecules attached to gold clusters has a previously unrecognized influence.
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4:28 PM | NSF grant to study the synthesis of nanoparticles resembling stainless steel
Mathew M. Maye, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award supports his ongoing work with metal stainless alloy nanostructures, the results of which may impact gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.
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4:24 PM | Chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution
Solution-based inorganic process could drive more efficient electronics and solar devices.
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4:19 PM | An optomechanical crystal to study interactions among colocalized photons and phonons
Electromagnetic radiation and mechanical vibrations of matter interact and exchange energy at the nanoscale. The experimental basis to study such interactions with precision is still being established. Researchers have now designed a silicon 1D Optomechanical crystal built up so that it allows to localize in a stable way both phonons and photons.
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3:27 PM | What is a project house?
In an article by Alex Scott about Clariant and its R&D structure, an interesting paragraph (emphasis mine):The company now has eight R&D centers and 50 technical application labs worldwide. “We now have a very good infrastructure for trying to develop innovations,” Kottmann said. Clariant is also testing models for accelerating innovation. One such model, in trials for the past couple of years, is the so-called project house, which draws together chemists and commercial […]
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3:22 PM | C&EN tackles chronic traumatic encephalopathy
Lauren Wolf looks at scientists trying to track the accumulation of tau (and other signs of CTE) in vivo: ...One question they’d like to answer is how much brain injury a person can handle before CTE sets in. With support from the Nevada Athletic Commission and local fight promoters, the group is gathering data by periodically testing its fighters and comparing them with a control group of age- and education-matched people who have never had head trauma. When the test subjects visit […]
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3:06 PM | This week's C&EN
From this week's issue: Wonderful quotes on committees: This letter on open workspaces takes a funny turn towards the end:...Teamwork and collaboration are important, but so is individual thought. The late science-fiction writer Robert Heinlein defined a committee as “a creature with three or more legs and no brain.” The National Aeronautics & Space Administration put it similarly: “None of us is as dumb as all of us.” James M. CastroHelena, Mont.Um, what's […]
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2:44 PM | Carbyne morphs from metal to semiconductor when stretched
Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator, according to Rice University scientists.
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12:16 PM | XPS and AES peak linearity adjustments
This post is a compilation of some calibration tech tips that I have written over the years. The procedures listed below explain how to calibrate the following systems and units: 5600 and 5400 XPS systems, Double pass CMA XPS analyzers … Continue reading → The post XPS and AES peak linearity adjustments appeared first on RBD TechSpot.
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11:40 AM | DNA used as a nano-gold lightswitch
A nanostructure made from two tiny gold rods reversibly changes its optical properties when specific DNA molecules are added.
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11:02 AM | New annotated journal articles
Research has shown that students can find it difficult to interpret and understand the information in journal articles, which can cause problems when they arrive at university and need to start using journals independently. As an organisation with a market leading journal portfolio and ambitions to encourage the growth of the chemical sciences by the dissemination of chemical knowledge, we decided to tackle this problem by creating an annotated journal article series. The series is […]
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10:20 AM | New spongelike structure converts solar energy into steam
The structure - a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam - is a porous, insulating material structure that floats on water. When sunlight hits the structure's surface, it creates a hotspot in the graphite, drawing water up through the material's pores, where it evaporates as steam.
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