Posts

February 26, 2015

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2:40 PM | Cambrios and Heraeus Jointly Create New, High-Conductivity Transparent Nanowire Conductors
Two companies' combined products dramatically extend flexible substrate capabilities for next-generation mass-market technology products.
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2:19 PM | Bioactive nanoengineered hydrogels for bone tissue engineering
Researchers have developed an injectable osteoinductive collagen-based nanosilicate matrix for growth-factor-free bone tissue engineering.
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1:41 PM | Young Nanoscientist India Award 2015 announces winner
The Nanotechnology Forum for Indian Scientists (NT Forum) announces that Dr Arindam Ghosh from IISC, Bangalore is the first winner of the 'Oxford Instruments Young Nanoscientist Award 2015'.
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1:35 PM | Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays (w/video)
New findings represent the first evidence of an organism using mineralized structural components to produce optical displays. While birds, butterflies, and beetles can display brilliant blues, among other colors, they do so with organic structures, such as feathers, scales, and plates. The limpet, by contrast, produces its blue stripes through an interplay of inorganic, mineral structures, arranged in such a way as to reflect only blue light.
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11:30 AM | Waste explosion at Texas Tech
On Feb. 2, a glass waste bottle exploded in a Texas Tec […]Related Posts:Beware drying nitrate-containing protic ionic liquidsGloves in the laboratory: To wear or not to wear?New lab safety video on personal protective equipmentDenver student hit in chest with jet of flaming methanolWorkers’ compensation for graduate students
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9:36 AM | 2D-NANOLATTICES nanoelectronics project makes important step with silicene
A European research project has made an important step towards the further miniaturisation of nanoelectronics, using a highly-promising new material called silicene. Its goal: to make devices of the future vastly more powerful and energy efficient.
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9:00 AM | Science: It's a Girl Thing! 3 Years Later...
(Disclaimer: I maybe two or three years late, but this is still an important issue, so it wouldn't hurt to address it today.)I was “googl-ing” other science and/or chemistry blogs to read and I came across this video here:This video was published by the European Commission for a campaign designed to attract more women to a career in science. The commission said that the video had to "speak their language to get their attention" and that it was intended to be […]
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8:21 AM | Moving molecules write letters
Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics.
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8:11 AM | Park Systems Joins Forces with imec to Develop Advancements in Nanoscale AFM Metrology Solutions for Semiconductor Manufacturing
Park Systems announced today they have signed a Joint Development Project with nanoelectronics research center imec, to develop in-line AFM metrology solutions of future technology nodes including but not limited to surface roughness, thickness, critical dimension, and sidewall roughness.

February 25, 2015

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11:31 PM | Bill Carroll: "to get the sharp corners knocked off you"
I have thrown a fair bit of criticism at ACS director-at-large Bill Carroll's way over the years. That said, like every experienced industrial chemist (even the ones who have left the lab), he has good tales to tell. He's starting a blog over at the ACS Network. I thought his first post was a good one, where he talks about his first years in industry: When I got there, my assignment had been changed from the sexy new polymer to working with impact modifiers for poly(vinyl […]
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7:50 PM | Nanomanufactured Block 'M' illustrates big ideas in drug delivery
By making what might be the world's smallest three-dimensional unofficial Block 'M', University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated a nanoparticle manufacturing process capable of producing multilayered, precise shapes.
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5:23 PM | Warming up the world of superconductors
A superconductor that works at room temperature was long thought impossible, but scientists may have discovered a family of materials that could make it reality.
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4:20 PM | You wouldn’t know a limpet had teeth from looking at it. These...
You wouldn’t know a limpet had teeth from looking at it. These soft, squishy sea snails cling to rocks and scrape algae into their mouths, which means their teeth need to be stronger than rock. Last week, a paper in the Royal Society’s journal Interface published the results of a limpet tooth stress test. It turns out that these teeth are the strongest biological material on the planet. (We wrote about graphene a few months ago, which is one of the strongest human-made […]
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4:20 PM | You wouldn’t know a limpet had teeth from looking at it. These...
You wouldn’t know a limpet had teeth from looking at it. These soft, squishy sea snails cling to rocks and scrape algae into their mouths, which means their teeth need to be stronger than rock. Last week, a paper in the Royal Society’s journal Interface published the results of a limpet tooth stress test. It turns out that these teeth are the strongest biological material on the planet. (We wrote about graphene a few months ago, which is one of the strongest human-made […]
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4:02 PM | Physicists in biology, inverse problems and other quirks of the genomic age
Nobel Laureate Sydney Brenner has criticized systems biology as a grandiose attempt to solve inverse problems in biologyLeo Szilard – brilliant, peripatetic Hungarian physicist, habitué of hotel lobbies, soothsayer without peer – first grasped the implications of a nuclear chain reaction in 1933 while stepping off the curb at a traffic light in London. Szilard has many distinctions to his name; not only did he file a patent for the first […]
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3:22 PM | Silicon micro-funnels increase the efficiency of solar cells
A biological structure in mammalian eyes has inspired scientists to design an inorganic counterpart for use in solar cells: micron-sized vertical funnels were etched shoulder-to-shoulder in a silicon substrate. Using mathematical models and experiments, they tested how these kind of funnel arrays collect incident light and conduct it to the active layer of a silicon solar cell. Their result: this arrangement of funnels increases photo absorption by about 65 percent in a thin-film solar cell.
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3:14 PM | Association of British Science Writers
I am delighted to report that my application for membership of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW) has been approved. I look forward to enjoying the benefits of membership of the association, and to contributing where and when I can.  
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3:05 PM | From Soldier to Scientist: The CSN’s Role in a Veteran’s Return to Civilian Life
With Operations Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn having ended and Enduring Freedom drawing to a close a new push is underway to retrain our returning veterans. The wars have produced 2.5 million veterans and the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology (CSN) is part of the push to help veterans retool their skillsets for civilian life through participating in […]
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2:55 PM | In quest for better lithium-air batteries, nanoparticle coatings improve carbon's stability
Researchers unveiled a new method of stabilizing carbon - a central structural component of any battery - that could pave the way to new performance standards in the hunt for a lithium-ion components.
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2:47 PM | Magnetic nanoparticles enhance performance of solar cells
Magnetic nanoparticles can increase the performance of solar cells made from polymers - provided the mix is right.
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2:20 PM | "S²→S¹: Input a point on a sphere, output a point on a circle[An] instance of such maps occurs in the..."
“S²→S¹: Input a point on a sphere, output a point on a circle[An] instance of such maps occurs in the crystallization of synthetic polypeptides and polynucleotides (artificial analogues of biological proteins and genetic material). Such substances are fibrous, giving to each point on the surface of a crystalline ball (S²) an orientation. The orientation may be specified as a point on an abstract sphere (S²) or, given that the fiber lies in the plane of the […]
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12:46 PM | Flexible nanosensors for wearable devices
A new method will enable the fabrication of optical nanosensors capable of sticking on uneven surfaces and biological surfaces like human skin. This result can boost the use of wearable devices to monitor parameters such as temperature, breath and heart pressure.
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9:51 AM | On route to self-powered smart suits
Such energy-scavenging fabrics based on nano-sized generators that have piezoelectric properties could eventually lead to wearable 'smart' clothes that can power integrated electronics and sensors through ordinary body movements. Researchers have now demonstrated a new type of fully flexible, very robust and wearable triboelectric nanogenerator with high power-generating performance and mechanical robustness. This was achieved by applying a bottom-up nanostructuring approach where a […]
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8:15 AM | nANO meets water VI: Nanotechnik für die Wasser-Praxis
Am 19. Februar 2015 hiess es wieder 'nANO meets water' bei Fraunhofer UMSICHT. Gut 100 Fachleute aus Industrie und Wirtschaft kamen nach Oberhausen, um sich beim Thema Innovationen und Risiken von Nanomaterialien für die Wassertechnik auf den neuesten Stand zu bringen.
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8:14 AM | Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy
Scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells.
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8:01 AM | New nanowire structure absorbs light efficiently
Dual-type nanowire arrays can be used in applications such as LEDs and solar cells.
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2:32 AM | What do we actually know about these "Molly" overdoses in CT?
News broke out of Connecticut yesterday that 12 people on the Wesleyan University campus were hospitalized after consuming "Molly".Wesleyan campus rocked by student overdoses Wesleyan overdose highlight risks of party drug "Molly" A dozen at Wesleyan sickened by bad batch of Molly, officials sayI'm not going to hash out why these are examples of maybe ok to horrible reporting on the matter, but with all of the information that we actually know from these articles, the story can be […]

February 24, 2015

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10:38 PM | Tom Morton-Smith's "Oppenheimer": Slight, trite and unoriginal
J. Robert Oppenheimer was a brilliant, enigmatic and complex man. Any treatment of his life, whether biographical or fictional, must bear the substantial weight of these qualities and capture the triumph and tragedy of his immensely consequential life. Unfortunately Tom Morton-Smith's "Oppenheimer" is little more than a short play version of a short Oppenheimer biography. All it really does is recreate in simple detail conversations and events from the physicist's life and career. But it never […]
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9:29 PM | Migrating to CDK 1.5: SSSR and two other ring sets
I arrived a bit earlier at the year 1 eNanoMapper meeting so that I could sit down with Nina Jealiazkova to work on migrating AMBIT2 to CDK 1.5. One of the big new things is the detection of ring systems, which John gave a major overhaul. Part of that is that the SSSRFinder is now retired into the legacy model. Myself, I haven't even gone into all the new goodies of this, but one of the things we needed to look at, is how to replace the use the SSSRFinder use for finding the SSSR set. So, I […]
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8:08 PM | Analytical Chemistry – A Guide to Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)
Today’s graphic is one for the chemists, with a guide to chemical shifts in proton nuclear magnetic resonance. At first glance, for those without a background in chemistry, this may well look largely nonsensical – however, if you’re interested in learning a little more about how chemists can work out the structures of organic compounds, read on […]
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