Posts

March 29, 2015

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11:29 PM | Interesting post on labor force participation at WSJ
From the Wall Street Journal: A survey from the Federal Reserve last week provided some clues. Around 21% of people said their plan for retirement is simply “to work as long as possible” and the number of people giving this response increases by age. Conversely, the traditional way to retire – working full-time in a career until ceasing work altogether – is the plan for 35% of people in their 20s. But by the time they reach their 60s, only 15% say it will […]
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5:17 PM | Smartphone camera hacks
Some nice tricks to deviate from the norm with your smartphone camera: Drive-by panorama, water-drop macro lens, armless selfies with your headphone cable, cardboard “tripod”, underwater housing, binocular zoom and more Smartphone camera hacks is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley Subscribe to our Email NewsletterSmartphone camera hacks is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David […]
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4:46 PM | The origin of specificity in ubiquitylation and proteasome...
The origin of specificity in ubiquitylation and proteasome mediated degradation A talk by Marc Kirschner, Harvard Medical School. Via CSHL Leading Strand. If you have an interesting biochemical process, or an interesting biological process, no matter how complicated it is (or maybe especially if it is complicated), it’s usually worth investigating it. It’s not complicated just to frustrate us - there’s really some principle lurking beneath it. A lot of biology really […]
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11:13 AM | This Week in Chemistry – Graphene Light Bulbs, & Cooked Crustacean Colour Changes
Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features the discovery of a new form of ice by flattening water between sheets of graphene, an antibacterial plastic made from a protein in egg whites, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers […]

March 28, 2015

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8:21 AM | UV Safe Umbrellas
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is an electromagnetic wave. It comes from the sun and travels to the surface of the Earth. While UVR is vital to human (it provides us with the essential vitamin, vitamin D), but it can also cause harm especially to the eye and skin such as burn, hyperpigmentation, photoaging skin, keratoconjunctivitis, stimulation of photodermatoses and cutaneous cancer.This is why we need different methods of protection from the harmful and potentially damaging sun rays. The types […]

March 27, 2015

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11:20 PM | Iron-catalyzed C-H Borylation
“Iron-Catalyzed C-H Borylation of Arenes” Dombray, T.; Werncke, C. G.; Jiang, S.; Grellier, M.; Vendier, L.; Bontemps, S.; Sortais, J-B.; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Darcel, C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b00895 C-H borylation, itself a green reaction for generating useful borylated compounds, is traditionally catalyzed by Ir and Rh. Much of the work has […]
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9:09 PM | Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem
Research team increases material's light emission by twelve times.
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9:00 PM | Shape-shifting sensor can report conditions from deep in the body
Scientists have devised and demonstrated a new, shape-shifting probe which is capable of sensitive, high-resolution remote biological sensing that is not possible with current technology.
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8:40 PM | How Good is Your Model?
Models, which underpin all chemical engineering design work, vary widely in their complexity, ranging from traditional dimensionless number correlations through to modern computer based techniques such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM). Industrial users require confidence in a model under the conditions it is to be applied in order to use it for design purposes and this can be a reason for slow acceptance of new techniques. This paper explores the validity […]
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5:10 PM | Nanoscale 'worms' provide new route to nano-necklace structures
Researchers have developed a novel technique for crafting nanometer-scale necklaces based on tiny star-like structures threaded onto a polymeric backbone. The technique could provide a new way to produce hybrid organic-inorganic shish kebab structures from semiconducting, magnetic, ferroelectric and other materials that may afford useful nanoscale properties.
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4:58 PM | Colorblind Chemistry offering advice
Want to talk to someone who isn't in early-middle age (i.e. me?) He'd be happy to hear from you: If you are someone seeking anonymous advice, feel free to send that, and I will attempt to facilitate that discussion discreetly for you. While I might not be in a position to answer many of those questions, sometimes you just “need an adult” and I can tell you from experience that the chemblogosphere has plenty of sympathetic ears. One of the major hurdles to jump over […]
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3:43 PM | Wow, Lufthansa has some intense tests
Apart from some rumored mechanism tests and synthesis problems, there doesn't seem to be a tradition of testing in pharmaceutical companies of its scientists. Not so for pilots!, according to Slate:The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, a German newspaper, reported Thursday that Lufthansa’s selection procedures test “perceptual speed and orientation skills, sensory-motor coordination, ability to multitask in complex situations, relevant personality traits (such as motivation and […]
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3:36 PM | My Interview with "The Polymer Babe"
Today I have a very special interview with "The Polymer Babe". Apparently she is the twin-sister-separated-at-birth of "The Food Babe". I think you will soon seen the similarities in their looks and personalities. The Polymer BabeJohn: You have some strong opinions about what should and should not be in polymeric materials. Can you explain?Polymer Babe (PB): Certainly. I believe that nothing that can be eaten or drunk by a person should be in polymers. No food whatsoever.John: Why do you feel […]
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3:33 PM | L'arsenic: poison ou potion?
Les Manchettes scientifiques d’Ariel Fenster Un recours collectif a été intenté aux États-Unis contre des producteurs de vin californiens suite à la découverte d'arsenic dans certains de leurs produits, y compris certains populaires au Québec comme le Ménage à trois. Malheureusement, la nouvelle a été reprise par les […]
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12:31 PM | State-of-the-art online system unveiled to pinpoint metrology software accuracy
The results of a three-year research project mean that advanced manufacturing companies will have on-line access to a new method of testing the accuracy of their crucial measurement software.
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11:30 AM | Yes, it was the kitty litter
The radioactive material release last year at the Waste […]Related Posts:Typo may have led to radioactive material leakReactive material release in nuclear waste facility possiblyBeware drying nitrate-containing protic ionic liquidsFree chemical health and safety journal articlesMuseums and radioactive artifacts
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10:54 AM | Nanotechnology materials: opportunities and challenges go hand in hand
Novel materials designed and fabricated with the help of nanotechnologies offer the promise of radical technological development. Many of these will improve our quality of life, and develop our economies, but all will be measured against the overarching principle that we do not make some error, and harm ourselves and our environment by exposure to new forms of hazard. A publication explores recent developments in nanomaterials research, and possibilities for safe, practical and […]
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10:45 AM | Do you like good music?
When we’re in our teens, it’s common that we first discover the music we see as our own, discarding the vinyl our parents played, and kicking back on beats to our own tune. For me it was a migration from 60s pop to 70s prog and hard rock. But, when you get to middle age […]Do you like good music? is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley Subscribe to our Email Newsletter
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9:21 AM | Novel nanocomposite coatings combine protection with colour effects
Incorporating colored pigments in nanocomposites make coatings possible which are not only protective but also deliver additional visual information via their coloration.
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9:13 AM | What is Ammonium Nitrate?
What is Ammonium Nitrate? Ammonium nitrate is a chemical compound with a chemical formula of NH4NO3. At room temperature ammonium nitrate has the appearance of a white crystalline solid. Ammonium nitrate is widely used in agriculture as a fertilizer due to its nitrogen content. Ammonium nitrate is used in the manufacture of instant cold packs. [...]
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9:02 AM | Frustration produces a quantum playground
A deeper understanding of quantum fluctuations in 'frustrated' layered magnetic crystals could speed the development of devices that probe real-world systems using quantum effects.
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8:58 AM | A first glimpse inside a macroscopic quantum state
Scientists have detected, for the first time, entanglement among individual photon pairs in a beam of squeezed light.
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7:30 AM | Scientist of the Week 4: Francis Crick
BiographyFrancis Crick born on the 8th June 1916 in Northampton, United Kingdom, graduated from UCL in 1937. During World War 2 he worked as a scientist for the Admiralty Research Laboratory, working on the design of magnetic and acoustic mines.In 1940 Crick married Ruth Doreen Dodd. Their son, Michael F.C Crick is a scientist. They were divorced in 1947. In 1949 Crick married Odile Speed. They have two daughters, Gabrielle A. Crick and Jacqueline M.T. Crick.  The family lived in a house […]
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6:41 AM | Publication of the week, number 70, 27th March 2015
This week we have a paper which takes another look at the synthesis of (R)-pantolactone and comes up with a chemoenzymatic three-step process to this important chiral building block. Incidentally it costs about £1.5/g from Aldrich. The industrial manufacture relies upon an aldol reaction with formaldehyde followed by cyanohydrin formation, with HCN and a crystallisation … Continue reading Publication of the week, number 70, 27th March 2015 →

March 26, 2015

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7:24 PM | There may be treble ahead
A catchy pop song of 2014 had the refrain “I’m all about that bass, no treble” or somesuch throwaway line. The accompanying video, much parodied and pastiched, was popular on teh interwebz and was apparently all about raising body image awareness and itself a pardoy of the modern pop culture in which certain characteristics of […]There may be treble ahead is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley Subscribe to our […]
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5:59 PM | We shy away from stories about new science and innovation, but a...
We shy away from stories about new science and innovation, but a history of bottled up frustration has us pumped about this development. Well done, MIT.
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5:41 PM | Novel nanoparticle therapy promotes wound healing (w/video)
An experimental therapy cuts in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all.
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5:25 PM | New study shows bacteria can use magnetic nanoparticles to create a 'natural battery'
The bacteria can load electrons onto and discharge electrons from microscopic particles of magnetite. This discovery holds out the potential of using this mechanism to help clean up environmental pollution, and other bioengineering applications.
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5:17 PM | Nanotechnology designer toolkit for dynamic DNA nanomachines
The latest DNA nanodevices - including a robot with movable arms, a book that opens and closes, a switchable gear, and an actuator - may be intriguing in their own right, but that's not the point. They demonstrate a breakthrough in the science of using DNA as a programmable building material for nanometer-scale structures and machines.
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5:11 PM | Chemists make new silicon-based nanomaterials
Researchers describe methods for making nanoribbons and nanoplates from a compound called silicon telluride. The materials are pure, p-type semiconductors (positive charge carriers) that could be used in a variety of electronic and optical devices.
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