Posts

September 27, 2014

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5:11 PM | Help CJ with his Act of Whimsy/Pain for #GeekGirlCon
For my Geek Girl Con Act of Whimsy, I need the number of inaccurate or misleading statements in the following Food Babe videos. If you can help, please listen to just 1 of the 5 following videos and count how many false or misleading things she says. Err on the generous side, if possible.The Subway videoThe Silly Putty videoThe one on celluloseAnother azodicarbonimide videoThe Mac and Cheese videoThanks! (And if you want to donate, click here!) 
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7:32 AM | Sugar is more addictive than cocaine... – what?!
“Everything is a poison, nothing is a poison. It is the dose that makes the poison.” Last week the statement “sugar is more addictive than cocaine” was spreading in the science news. I personally found this really strange and hard to believe, so I was directed to an article about a study conducted by the University of Edinburgh.     The original article discusses this from a psychological
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1:50 AM | It's the most wonderful time of the year...#2014Nobels
...and the carolers are already out. Thomson Reuters already have their 2014 Nobel Prize prediction list, and past tradition obliges me to respond. C&EN is also having a nice panel discussion on the prize at 3:30 PM EDT on September 29th, so if you want to contribute to the chest-thumping/eye-gouging polite discussion feel free to join.I was of course quite tickled when my own field won the prize last year so I think it's safe to discount a theoretical or […]

September 26, 2014

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4:15 PM | Chemistry Literature Feature Vol. VI
Have you seen a good paper lately? Written one? Send it in and have it featured here! treetownchem@gmail.comIn this episode of the Chemistry Literature Feature, we'll take a look at some new developments in molecular wires, track individual atoms through a catalyst that cleans your gasoline for you, meet some protein labels with interesting and useful functionalities, and more. But first, a quote from an education research seminar that recently happened in the department:Overheard at […]
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1:51 PM | This Bloomberg article badly needs some context
Bloomberg Businessweek has an article on ZMapp where they're alleging that the Defense Threat Reduction Agency badly mismanaged the development of ZMapp. I suspect that few people havethe cultural expertise (i.e. knowledge of government/DoD operations) and pharma experience to know who was in the wrong or the right: Meade’s time as the business chief at DTRA also coincided with a culture clash within the agency, one confirmed by three other people familiar with the agency who […]
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1:24 PM | Graphene looks promising as a flexible, low-cost touchscreen solution
New research suggests that graphene-treated nanowires could soon replace current touchscreen technology, significantly reducing production costs and allowing for more affordable, flexible displays.
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1:20 PM | How 144 gold atoms can increase solar cell performance
Scientists have discovered that a small molecule created with just 144 atoms of gold can increase solar cell performance by more than 10 per cent.
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1:19 PM | 'Multi-spectra glasses' for scanning electron microscopy
Reflection zone plates enable lighter elements in material samples will be efficiently and precisely detected using scanning electron microscopy by providing high resolution in the range of 50-1120 eV.
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12:11 PM | New technology taps into the power of a single electron to control energy consumption inside transistors
Researchers found that by adding a specific atomic thin film layer to a transistor, the layer acted as a filter for the energy that passed through it at room temperature. The signal that resulted from the device was six to seven times steeper than that of traditional devices. Steep devices use less voltage but still have a strong signal.
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12:05 PM | New imaging capability reveals possible key to extending battery lifetime, capacity
A new method developed for studying battery failures points to the potential next step in extending lithium ion battery lifetime and capacity, opening a path to wider use of these batteries in conjunction with renewable energy sources.
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9:09 AM | Nanotechnology and 3D-printing
3D-printing processes are engineered to use material more efficiently, give designs more flexibility and produce objects more precisely. These 3D printing techniques are reaching a stage where desired products and structures can be made independent of the complexity of their shapes. Applying 3D printing concepts to nanotechnology could bring similar advantages to nanofabrication - speed, less waste, economic viability - than it is expected to bring to manufacturing technologies. here we show […]
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5:53 AM | Exploring the potential of 'valleytronics'
Harnessing an unusual 'valley' quantum property of electrons offers a new possibility for next-generation electronics.
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2:09 AM | Avoiding Heroin and Crack, Getting Hooked on K2
This post is part of a collaborative narrative series composed of my writing and Chris Arnade’s photos exploring issues of addiction, poverty, prostitution and urban anthropology in Hunts... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:26 AM | Publication of the week, number 44, 26th September 2014
This week’s offering deals with a reaction which I experimented with several years ago (more later), the well studied [3+2] cycloaddition of azomethine ylides with alkenes producing pyrrolidines. Normally the ylide is derived from the imine of an amino acid however Waters and his group now report a novel entry to produce azomethine ylides starting from allylic […]

September 25, 2014

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7:21 PM | A Brief Guide to Common Painkillers
Following on from the previous post on antibiotics, it seemed logical to also take a look at the drugs we take to relieve pain. Painkilling drugs, or analgesics, come in a number of forms, but fall broadly into two main classes: non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids. This graphic takes a look at a selection […]
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7:00 PM | New discovery could pave the way for spin-based computing
Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures.
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6:55 PM | Longstanding bottleneck in crystal structure prediction solved
The various patterns that atoms of a solid material can adopt, called crystal structures, can have a huge impact on its properties. Being able to accurately predict the most stable crystal structure for a material has been a longstanding challenge for scientists. Researchers calculated the lattice energy of benzene, a simple yet important molecule in pharmaceutical and energy research, to sub-kilojoule per mole accuracy - a level of certainty that allows polymorphism to be resolved.
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6:50 PM | On the road to artificial photosynthesis
New experimental results have revealed the critical influence of the electronic and geometric effects in the carbon dioxide reduction reaction.
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4:20 PM | Nanoscale optimization to make 'greener' cement
Analysis of material's molecular structure leads to a new formula that could cut greenhouse-gas emissions.
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3:41 PM | South Korea needs chemists?
Via Linda Wang on Twitter, I see that the South Korean government measures its job opening demand; they're low on finance jobs and high on chemistry ones: Employment Information Service (KEIS) announced the results of analyzing the number of jobs per job seeker – the index to gauge the supply and demand of manpower – by calculating it with statistics, as of July of 2014, about finding jobs and people from WORKNET, a state-run Internet site for job hunting. If the number is […]
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3:26 PM | Job posting: assistant professors, University of Denver, Denver, CO
From the inbox: The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Denver is expanding our Molecular Life Sciences Initiative through cluster hires.  The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry invites applications for two tenure-track faculty positions at the Assistant Professor level to begin September 1, 2015.  We seek candidates with research interests in biophysical chemistry/biochemistry that include, but are not limited to the study of protein structure […]
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2:54 PM | Determining Temperature Boundary of the A1→(A1+B2) Phase Transformation in the Copper-55 at% Palladium Alloy Subjected to Severe Plastic Deformation
The changes in phase state, electrical properties and microhardness of copper-55 at% palladium alloy samples with different initial states (as-quenched and deformed via severe plastic deformation (SPD)) were studied during isothermal annealing. Ordered B2-phase formation in the disordered (A1) matrix was found to occur at a significantly higher temperature than is indicated in the generally accepted phase diagram of the Cu-Pd system. Corresponding electrical resistivity is also lower than […]
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2:53 PM | Two very #chemjobs-oriented personal statements in the DOC election ballot
Members of the Division of Organic Chemistry get to vote on two industrial folks for Chair-Elect, both of whom seem to be oriented towards issues of chemistry employment and unemployment*: Paul L. Feldman joined Glaxo Pharmaceuticals, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina in 1987 following receiving his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley....Personal Statement: The Division of Organic Chemistry (DOC) of the American Chemical Society has a rich, venerable tradition in serving […]
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2:13 PM | Solar cell compound probed under pressure
Gallium arsenide a semiconductor composed of gallium and arsenic is well known to have properties that promise practical applications. In the form of nanowires it has particular potential for use in solar cell manufacture and optoelectronics in many of the same applications that silicon is commonly used. But its natural semiconducting ability requires tuning to make it more desirable for use in manufacturing. New work offers a novel approach to such tuning.
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2:07 PM | New organic semiconductor material - organic tin increases light absorption
Semiconducting polymers can be used, for example, for the absorption of sun light in solar cells. By incorporating organic tin into the plastic, light can be absorbed over a wide range of the solar spectrum.
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2:05 PM | Wake up and Smell the Story: A Podcast about Your Nose
If you asked people which of their senses they most feared losing, they’d probably say sight or hearing. But what about the ability to smell? This episode of Distillations examines what is perhaps our most underrated sense, and ponders what life would be like without it. First, producer Mariel Carr hits the streets of South Philadelphia to understand how a pervasive odor troubled neighborhood residents throughout the summer of 2014. Then reporter Jocelyn Frank tells us the […]
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2:05 PM | Wake up and Smell the Story: A Podcast about Your Nose
If you asked people which of their senses they most feared losing, they’d probably say sight or hearing. But what about the ability to smell? This episode of Distillations examines what is perhaps our most underrated sense, and ponders what life would be like without it. First, producer Mariel Carr hits the streets of South Philadelphia to understand how a pervasive odor troubled neighborhood residents throughout the summer of 2014. Then reporter Jocelyn Frank tells us the […]
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1:09 PM | Suzhou's Nanopolis Nanotechnology Hub is Thriving
In 2011, Suzhou Industrial Park started building a hub for nanotechnology development and commercialization called Nanopolis that today is a thriving and diverse economic community where research institutes, academics and start-up companies can co-exist and where new technology can flourish.
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1:02 PM | Teijin Aramid's Carbon Nanotube Fibers Awarded With Paul Schlack Prize
Researchers of Teijin Aramid, based in the Netherlands, and Rice University in the USA are awarded with the honorary 'Paul Schlack Man-Made Fibers Prize' for corporate-academic partnerships in fiber research. Their new super fibers are now driving innovation in aerospace, healthcare, automotive, and (smart) clothing.
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12:53 PM | Nanotechnology now has its smallest reference material
NIST recently issued Reference Material (RM) 8027, the smallest known reference material ever created for validating measurements of these man-made, ultrafine particles between 1 and 100 nanometers in size.
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