Posts

December 03, 2014

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5:23 PM | Peering into Peer Review
‘I do not think it should appear in its present form’. Many a dejected researcher has read those words when their paper is summarily rejected by a journal. Rest assured, however, even the greatest scientific minds have read them on occasion. In 1839, Charles Darwin submitted a paper on the geology of Glen Roy in [...]
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5:02 PM | Glove choice - it does matter
I missed this over the Thanksgiving week, so I'm assuming others did too. I've been adamant over the years (1, 2 and 3) about not just grabbing the nitrile gloves because they are readily available and because of their resistance to a broad range of chemicals. That range is broad, but not broad enough. Since different polymers and rubbers are soluble (or swellable) in different solvents, you need to be prepared to use different gloves in different situations.Jyllian Kemsley in the C & ENew […]
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4:26 PM | The name's bond - reversible covalent bond.
Fifteen years ago most people would have laughed at you if you told them kinase inhibitors would become such a big deal: the received wisdom at that point was that anything that competed with ATP for one kinase would just indiscriminately hit other kinases. While that is generally true, we have found over the intervening decade that there is a wealth of detail - type II motifs, allosteric binding, relatively straightforward residue selectivity etc. - that can be tweaked to provide selectivity. […]
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4:13 PM | Nanoparticle network could bring fast-charging batteries
A new electrode design for lithium-ion batteries has been shown to potentially reduce the charging time from hours to minutes by replacing the conventional graphite electrode with a network of tin-oxide nanoparticles.
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3:46 PM | Wireless nanorod-nanotube film enables light stimulation of blind retina
Groundbreaking wireless material triggers brain activity in response to light.
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3:41 PM | Electronic 'tongue' to ensure food quality
An electronic 'tongue' could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease.
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3:38 PM | Semiconductor nanowire mesh produces clean hydrogen fuel
For years, scientists have been pursuing 'artificial leaf' technology, a green approach to making hydrogen fuel. Now, one team reports progress toward a stand-alone system that lends itself to large-scale, low-cost production.
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2:18 PM | Researchers create multifunctional nanotubes using nontoxic materials
Coffee, apple juice, and vitamin C: things that people ingest every day are experimental material for chemist Eva-Maria Felix.
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2:12 PM | Buckyballs enhance carbon capture
Environmentally friendly material targets flue gases, wells.
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1:51 PM | Ultra-stable, ultra-thin bonding technology for vacuum seal
Though it is less than 100 nanometers thick, the bond can withstand pressure up to 2 megapascals (almost 300 pounds per square inch), and its drift, or how much it shifts over time, is on the order of less than 3 trillionths of a meter per hour.
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1:47 PM | Uniform nanowire arrays for research and manufacturing
Researchers have achieved a breakthrough: Reproducible synthesis of gallium-nitride nanowires with controlled size and location on silicon substrates.
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1:41 PM | How is Ethanol Made?
Known as drinking alcohol, ethanol is the main type of alcohol present in alcoholic beverages. To be accurate, the term alcohol refers to a wider group of chemicals, but colloquially ethanol and alcohol are used interchangeably. This psychoactive compound is one of the oldest recreational drugs used by humans and if consumed in large amounts [...]
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10:15 AM | Computer model enables design of complex DNA shapes
Engineers computer-design the most complicated 3-D structures ever made from DNA.
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10:06 AM | Toshiba Develops Gold Nanocatalyst-Based Artificial Photosynthesis Technology
Toshiba Corporation announced the development of a new technology that uses solar energy, the power of the sun, to generate carbon compounds from carbon dioxide and water, and to deliver a viable chemical feedstock or fuel with potential for use in industry.
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10:00 AM | Colorful nano-guides to the liver
Scientists have been successful in producing highly specific nanoparticles. Depending on the bound dye the particles are guided to the liver or to the kidney and deliver their payload of active ingredients directly to the targeted tissue.
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9:47 AM | European Parliament agrees on moratorium on nanofoods and on a new legal definition of engineered nanomaterials
A majority of the members of the Environmental, Public Health and Food Safety (EHS) committee of the European Parliament approved several amendments to the draft regulation on novel foods, including one imposing a moratorium on novel foods containing nanomaterials. The EHS committee's amendments to the Commission's proposal show that the European Parliament and the European Commission clearly have two different approaches towards the regulation of nanotechnologies.
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9:39 AM | Elektronenpaare auf Knopfdruck
Phsyiker konnten erstmals die paarweise Emission von Elektronen aus einem Halbleiter-Quantenpunkt und deren anschließende räumliche Aufspaltung in zwei getrennte Leiter nachweisen.
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9:20 AM | OCSiAl Receives Technology Innovation Award for Its Game-Changing Carbon Nanotube Production Process
The patent-protected process allows commercialization of single-walled nanotubes that can revolutionize material science.
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7:23 AM | Taking self-assembly to the limits
Confining tiny gold colloids inside nanoscale templates reveals how to design complex structures beyond the capabilities of conventional lithography.
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7:21 AM | Carving out a golden opportunity
Upsetting the stability of super-small gold clusters generates multifaceted nanocrystals with potent catalytic properties.
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7:18 AM | A molecular thread
Flexible metal-organic frameworks with a range of pore sizes are made by threading through molecular ligands.
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7:12 AM | New technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography
Researchers have devised a powerful technique that simultaneously resolves the chemical characterization and topography of nanoscale materials down to the height of a single atom.

December 02, 2014

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8:22 PM | A better look at the chemistry of interfaces
New X-ray spectroscopy technique at Berkeley Lab's advanced light source for the study of heterogeneous interfaces.
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8:16 PM | Atmospheric carbon dioxide used for energy storage products
Chemists and engineers have discovered a fascinating new way to take some of the atmospheric carbon dioxide that's causing the greenhouse effect and use it to make an advanced, high-value material for use in energy storage products.
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8:09 PM | The Chemistry of Poinsettia Plants
Following on from the start of the Chemistry Advent Calendar yesterday, here’s another festive post, this time looking at the chemistry of the poinsettia plant. The red leaves of the poinsettia plant can be used to make a pH indicator, due to their chemical composition; this is actually something of an upgrade on one of the […]
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5:30 PM | A great question: why do holiday layoffs exist?
A respected reader writes in to ask, regarding the GSK announcement tomorrow:"Why does a company opt to let people know they are losing their jobs three weeks before Christmas?" I would actually go so far as to propose that, in the United States, that large-enough companies declare some sort of truce during the holidays. If I were a CEO, I would choose not to hold any reductions in force between say, Thanksgiving and New Year's. I realize that would basically cut out a month in a half […]
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5:25 PM | Reverse Seasonal Affective Disorder: People who get SAD in the Summer
By: Lina Jamis, 2nd year student in the Anatomy Graduate Program Snow-lovers rejoice—winter is coming! And no, this isn’t an allusion to Game of Thrones. With the end of Daylight Savings, the days are becoming darker earlier, which for some can mean the onset of the winter blues. The medical term for this is Seasonal Affective Disorder…
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4:37 PM | Daily Pump Trap: 12/2/14 edition
Just a few positions posted on C&EN Jobs this past week, not a whole bunch: Houston, TX: Aramco is looking for a lab tech with "Minimum two (2) years of college or an Associate Degree in related-science major required; Bachelor degree in related science discipline preferred. Nine (9) years industrial research lab experience"Super specific -- H-1b related position? Morristown, NJ: Honeywell is looking for a M.S./Ph.D. analytical chemist to be a lead analytical chemist. Organic and […]
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4:35 PM | Carbon nanotubes may restore sight to blind retinas
Retinal degeneration is one of the most worrisome dangers in the aging process. Now, researchers have made an important technological breakthrough towards a prosthetic retina that could help alleviate conditions that result from problems with this vital part of the eye.
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4:15 PM | Post-Thanksgiving Hangover
It was quite a Thanksgiving weekend for me, so I'm behind on a lot of things. Consequently, today's post is pretty simple and quick to get out. The British website Sciencecraft published a Q & A with me on Friday. Since I'm sure many Americans were out shopping for Black Friday specials and dozing off after eating turkey sandwiches, you might have missed it. I was asked a lot of wide-ranging questions and gave back even more wide-ranging answers, so I'm sure someone will take issue with […]
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