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Posts

April 04, 2014

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3:16 PM | Spend your summer with Chemistry World
What makes a news story ‘news’? How do journalists construct an article? What sort of cake do they have in the Royal Society of Chemistry restaurant? If any of these questions have occurred to you, then you might be the person we’re looking for. Chemistry World has a paid internship available for eight weeks in [...]
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2:59 PM | "Designing drugs without chemicals"
As usual Derek beat me to highlighting this rather alarming picture from an October 5, 1981 issue of Fortune magazine that I posted on Twitter yesterday. The image is from an article about computer-aided design and it looks both like a major communications failure (chemical-free drugs, anyone?) as well as a massive dollop of hype about computer-aided drug design. In fact the article has been cited by drug designers themselves as an example of the famous hype curve, with 1981 representing the […]
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2:42 PM | Chemists Save King’s College Choir
The Newscripts gang had to carefully navigate the interwebs this week to find Amusing News Aliquots. That’s because plenty in the science and tech crowd posted April Fools’ stories–including one about a study that found scientists need to use more esoteric jargon when communicating with the public and another about how Google Fiber can also […]
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12:24 PM | Lab-on-a-chip to detect pancreatic cancer in 5 hours
At the heart of the CANDO initiative, a lab-on-a chip device will be developed which will enable automatically identifying and measuring the concentration of circulating tumour cells.
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12:17 PM | To bridge LEDs' green gap, scientists think small - really small
Nanostructures half the breadth of a DNA strand could improve the efficiency of light emitting diodes, especially in the 'green gap', simulations have shown. Nanostructure LEDs made from indium nitride could lead to more natural-looking white lighting while avoiding some of the efficiency loss today's LEDs experience at high power.
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9:31 AM | Brain-on-a-chip
Scientists have great expectations that nanotechnologies will bring them closer to the goal of creating computer systems that can simulate and emulate the brain's abilities for sensation, perception, action, interaction and cognition while rivaling its low power consumption and compact size ? basically a brain-on-a-chip. Already, scientists are working hard on laying the foundations for what is called neuromorphic engineering - a new interdisciplinary discipline that includes nanotechnologies […]
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7:01 AM | Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring (w/video)
Engineers have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin and incorporate commercial, off-the-shelf chip-based electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring.
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6:48 AM | Probing the next generation of 2D materials
Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is part of a wider group of materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides and has been put forward by researchers as a potential building block for the next generation of low-cost electrical devices.
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6:41 AM | Electronics that dissolve when triggered
'Transient electronics' are based on special polymers designed to quickly and completely melt away when a trigger is activated.
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6:10 AM | Brief comments on the EU Debate
This week saw the TV debate between Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage on the UK’s EU membership. Both presented their cases robustly, and the perception of a ‘winner’ depends on which side of the argument you support. So I think the reason Farage ‘won’ is because more people with  anti-EU views took part in the […]
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2:15 AM | Publication of the week, number 20, 4th April 2014
This week’s offering presents us with the preparation of a common pharmacophore from the amino acid biomass. and appeared in JACS written by MacMillan and Zuo of Princeton. The general strategy was seen as photoredox-mediated single-electron oxidation of the carboxylate functionality of an α-amino acid, followed by loss of CO2, to render an α-carbamoyl radical. Radical−radical coupling of […]

April 03, 2014

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7:08 PM | Nanotubes made from plants could allow delivery of DNA into cells, improve chemotherapy treatment
A novel nanotube, created from plant waste, could someday help to correct genetic disorders or treat cancer without chemotherapy's nasty side effects.
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4:52 PM | Microreactors produce nanoparticle inks for printing solar cells
The work is based on the use of a 'continuous flow' microreactor to produce nanoparticle inks that make solar cells by printing. Existing approaches based mostly on batch operations are more time-consuming and costly.
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4:49 PM | Amusing News Aliquots
Silly samplings from this week’s science news, compiled by Sophia Cai, Bethany Halford, and Jeff Huber. Stray baby elephant wanders into living room, gets a snack. The Newscripts gang would like a baby elephant, please. [io9] Scientists at England’s University of Leicester have run the numbers and determined that Noah’s ark could have held 70,000 […]
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3:55 PM | You Got your Alchemy in my Art! You Got your Art in my Alchemy!
Plate IV in William Salmon’s Polygraphice (Roy G. Neville Historical Chemical Library, CHF) By Elisabeth Berry Drago Art and alchemy, science and painting. They’re kind of a delicious combination. And not as bizarre as it sounds, I promise. For a modern reader, William Salmon’s Polygraphice might seem like a strange jumble, a hodgepodge of unrelated things shoved into one overstuffed Hot Pocket of a book. Published in 1685, the Polygraphice is at first glance an […]
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3:32 PM | Fake Meat as Cleantech Investment
The New York Times today has a fascinating feature about a new crop of businesses developing better-tasting meat substitutes. According to the Times, Demand for meat alternatives is growing, fueled by trends as varied as increased vegetarianism and concerns over the impact of industrial-scale animal husbandry on the environment. The trend has also attracted a […]
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3:25 PM | Daily Pump Trap: 4/3/14 edition
Good morning! Don't call it a comeback, but here are a few relevant or interesting positions among the many that are being posted on C&EN Jobs.Wilmington, MA: Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry is hiring junior and senior-level chemists; anyone out there know what it's like to work here?Baton Rouge, LA: I love this description in this Albemarle posting for a senior R&D chemist:The successful candidate will support our R&D activities directed toward the identification, […]
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2:51 PM | Magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumour cells to self-destruct (w/video)
The clever thing about the technique is that researchers can target selected cells without harming surrounding tissue. There are many ways to kill cells, but this method is contained and remote-controlled.
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2:00 PM | It is a people business, after all
  Drs. Tom Baldwin and Miriam Ziegler have been a team for over four decades. As former trainees in the Baldwin/Ziegler lab, Carole Stivers, Zak Campbell, and I felt that it was an appropriate time to reflect on over forty years of science research and education by the Baldwin/Ziegler group. Tom and Miriam have been […]
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1:33 PM | Why are Plants Green?
The magic of chlorophyll As the weather gets sunnier, and the days get longer, you may have started to enjoy the great outdoors a little bit more. Plants are growing faster and seem greener than usual (does that lawn need cutting again?), but what’s causing all this? The answer: chlorophyll. Present in just about every [...]
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12:49 PM | Structural insights into the inner workings of a viral nanomachine
Researchers are using new nanoscale im-aging approaches to shed light on the dynamic activities of rotaviruses, important pathogens that cause life-threatening diarrhea in young children.
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12:44 PM | An ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3D microtissue engineering
A novel ultrathin collagen matrix assembly allows for the unprecedented maintenance of liver cell morphology and function in a microscale 'organ-on-a-chip' device that is one example of 3D microtissue engineering.
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12:39 PM | How electrodes charge and discharge
New analysis probes charge transfer in porous battery electrodes for the first time.
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12:31 PM | Tiny biomolecular tweezers studying force effect of cells
A new type of biomolecular tweezers could help researchers study how mechanical forces affect the biochemical activity of cells and proteins. The devices - too small to see without a microscope - use opposing magnetic and electrophoretic forces to precisely stretch the cells and molecules, holding them in position so that the activity of receptors and other biochemical activity can be studied.
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10:18 AM | Gold Steps Up
Catalyst: A substance that increases the rate of a reaction without modifying the overall standard Gibbs energy change in the reaction (IUPAC Gold Book).Though most chemists agree on the above definition, there have always been two camps: "Academic" catalysis (1-20 mol%, 5-100 turnovers), and "Industrial" Catalysis (<0.01 mol%, >10,000 turnovers). As more researchers seek to translate early discoveries into efficient, "green" processes, the desire for robust organometallic […]
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9:54 AM | Sicher Arbeiten mit Nanomaterialien
Die Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung (DGUV) hat das neue Arbeitsschutz-Nano-Portal offiziell vorgestellt. Das Portal bietet aktuelle Informationen zur Arbeitssicherheit und neuartige, interaktive E-Learning Tools, die 'Nanoramen'.
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8:41 AM | Interwoven solar cells turn T-shirt into a power textile
New solar cell technology allows your T-shirt to generate power from its interwoven solar cell wires. Researchers have developed a novel efficient wire-shaped polymer solar cell by incorporating a thin layer of titania nanoparticles between the photoactive material and electrode. An aligned carbon nanotube fiber enabled high flexibility and stability of the resulting polymer solar cell. These miniature polymer solar cell wires, when woven into textiles, can serve as a power source.
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8:33 AM | Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop
New drug delivery method targets cancer cells - not the entire body - and limits chemotherapy side effects.
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7:21 AM | Park Systems Introduces Automatic Defect Review for Semiconductor Wafers - An Astounding 1,000% Throughput Increase
Park Systems, a leading manufacturer of atomic force microscopy (AFM) products, introduces the Automatic Defect Review (ADR)AFM for 300mm bare wafers, a fully automated AFM solution that improves throughput of AFM defect review by up to 1,000%. The 300mm bare wafer ADR AFM is a new process for identifying defects designed specifically for the semiconductor market without the need of reference markers.
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12:52 AM | Fukuyama, Round 2
An astute commenter has clued me in to the latest round of corrections coming from the Fukuyama research group (see 1, 2, 3, 4). Targets affected include lyconadins A-C, ecteinascidin 743, and mersicarpine, and publication dates range from 2010-2013. This time, they're in JACS which, to my knowledge, does not (yet) employ a full-time data analyst like Organic Letters does.The corrections read much the same as the last raft, released two months prior in Org. Lett., alleging […]
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