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Posts

March 31, 2014

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2:05 PM | Artificial nanostructures lead to breakthrough in creating invisibility cloaks, stealth technology
Scientists have managed to create artificial nanostructures that can 'bend light,' called metamaterials. But the challenge has been making enough of the material to turn invisibility cloaks into a practical reality. New work may have just cracked that barrier.
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2:00 PM | All inactive kinase states are similar but...
CDK2 bound to inhibitor staurosporine (PDB code: 1aq1)…active kinase states are active in their own way. This admittedly awkward rephrasing of Tolstoy's quote came to my mind as I read this new report on differences between active and inactive states of kinases as revealed by differential interactions with inhibitors. The paper provides a good indication of why kinases continue to provide such enduring objects of interest for drug designers. Ever since imatinib (Gleevec) opened the […]
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1:57 PM | Nanofiber paper filter removes viruses
Researchers have developed a paper filter, which can remove virus particles with the efficiency matching that of the best industrial virus filters. The paper filter consists of 100 percent high purity cellulose nanofibers, directly derived from nature.
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12:30 PM | Boost your lab ergonomics IQ
Contributed by Dow Lab Safety Academy When people talk about ergonomic issues, they often refer to things like carpal tunnel syndrome from sitting at a desk and typing. But there are also ergonomic risks associated with working in a laboratory. If you know what they are, you can take steps to minimize stress on your […]
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11:21 AM | Tasty research at ACS Dallas
If you follow us on Twitter you’ll know that I spent 16-20 March in Dallas, Texas for the ACS spring conference, hearing about peptides that attack TB, dissolvable electronics and new drug testing methods. — Chocolate absorbing volatiles from wine I was also happy to find that – perhaps fitting for a state known for [...]
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10:12 AM | Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames
Researchers have revealed similarities between the molecular mechanism of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and hydrocarbon combustion. The study identifies new ways to control the growth of CNTs and increase the understanding of fuel combustion processes.
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8:54 AM | Digital nanofluidics - manipulating water droplets on surfaces
Existing nanofluidic approaches to facilitate the manipulation of ultra-small amounts of liquids usually require their confinement within quasi-1D nanochannels or nanopores. In these devices, the movement of the liquid objects must follow pre-designed routes. Researchers have now demonstrated a new platform for digital nanofluidics where water nanodroplets are trapped between a mica surface and graphene. Here, with the assistance of a graphene protection layer and ice-like lubricant monolayer, […]
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8:14 AM | Nanotechnology researchers discover temporary violation of Second Law of Thermodynamics
An international team of researchers found that a nanoparticle trapped with laser light temporarily violates the famous second law of thermodynamics, something that is impossible on human time and length scale.
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8:00 AM | Bayer Divests Itself From Patents For Carbon Nanotubes And Graphene
After concluding its research work on carbon nanotubes and graphenes, Bayer MaterialScience is divesting itself of fundamental intellectual property in this field.
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5:52 AM | Platinum Capital to Launch Two Global Nanotechnology Indices
Platinum Capital, a boutique investment firm, today announced the company will formally launch its own global nanotechnology indices - PCG Nanotechnology, Index - Diversified and the PCG Nanotechnology Index - Pure.
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5:41 AM | Picosun And Bosch Team Up in Atomic Layer Deposition
Picosun Oy, the manufacturer of leading quality Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) equipment, delivers advanced ALD technology to Bosch's Corporate Sector Research and Advance Engineering for development of novel ALD processes for new products and applications.

March 30, 2014

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7:29 PM | Nanotechnology 'smart band-aid' monitors movement of disorder patients
Medical engineers said Sunday they had created a device the size of a plaster which can monitor patients by tracking their muscle activity before administering their medication.
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4:51 PM | Bioceramic armor - Tough as nails, yet clear enough to read through
Researchers uncover the secrets behind a marine creature's defensive armor - one that is exceptionally tough, yet optically clear.
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4:42 PM | Heat-conducting nanofiber polymer cools hot electronic devices at 200 degrees Celsius
By harnessing an electropolymerization process to produce aligned arrays of polymer nanofibers, researchers have developed a thermal interface material able to conduct heat 20 times better than the original polymer. The material can operate at up to 200 degrees Celsius.
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3:46 PM | Women, Sexual Abuse and Addiction
This post is part of a collaborative narrative series composed of my writing and Chris Arnade’s photos exploring issues of addiction, poverty, prostitution and urban anthropology in Hunts... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:42 PM | Hello, Toronto Star readers
If you came here from reading the article in the Toronto Star about Sheri Sangji, you may be interested in reading more about the case.Here are all of the posts that I have written on this tragic case. Here is the post with the comment about the "wrist slap".The most comprehensive article about the case is Jyllian Kemsley's "Learning from UCLA", with links to all the primary documents.  
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3:00 PM | Linked Open Drug Data: three years on
Almost three years ago I collaborated with others in the W3C Health Care and Life Sciences interest group. One of the results of that was a paper in the special issue around the semantic web conference at one of the bianual, national ACS meeting (look at this nice RDFa-rich meeting page!). My contribution was around the ChEMBL-RDF, which I recently finally published, though it was already described earlier in an HCLS note.Anyway, when this paper reached the most viewed paper position in the […]

March 29, 2014

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2:16 PM | Eric and Sonya: Crystal Meth and a New City
This post is part of a collaborative narrative series composed of my writing and Chris Arnade’s photos exploring issues of addiction, poverty, prostitution and urban anthropology in Hunts... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 28, 2014

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5:04 PM | Finding the mix: Solar cell efficiency a delicate balance
New reveals that solar cell efficiency is based upon a delicate balance between the size and purity of the interior layers, or domains. These findings may lead to better designs and improved performance in organic solar cells.
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3:52 PM | Researchers develop technique to measure quantity, risks of engineered nanomaterials delivered to cells
Scientists at the Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology at Harvard School of Public Health have discovered a fast, simple, and inexpensive method to measure the effective density of engineered nanoparticles in physiological fluids, thereby making it possible to accurately determine the amount of nanomaterials that come into contact with cells and tissue in culture.
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3:09 PM | Researchers demonstrate information processing using a light-based chip inspired by our brain
Researchers from Ghent University report on a novel paradigm to do optical information processing on a chip, using techniques inspired by the way our brain works.
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3:04 PM | Theoretical model shows polymer-coated nanocubes form complex structures
Scientists have developed a theoretical model to explore the effect of polymer coatings, including DNA, for self-assembly of nanocubes into so-called superlattices.
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2:57 PM | Rainbow-catching waveguide could revolutionize energy technologies
By slowing and absorbing certain wavelengths of light, engineers open new possibilities in solar power, thermal energy recycling and stealth technology.
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2:51 PM | The STEM contest: vote now!
Finally, it returns. Last month, I asked you all to come up with new words for the ridiculous acronym STEM, considering that, in my opinion, it confuses the issue and engenders bad thinking. Lots of you entered, and I promised that the winner would get "a certificate, a handwritten thank you note, a box of the finest Chemjobber business cards and a bag of hard candies". Well, it's time to vote. Here are the nominees that I chose:The Iron Chemist: "Salaries Terrible, Employment […]
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2:30 PM | An interesting comment on the fine chemicals biz
Rick Mullin's blog on the fine chemical business is always worth a read; his comments on Albany Molecular's recent move is no exception: This week’s announcement that Albany Molecular Research Inc. will acquire Cedarburg Hauser Pharmaceuticals—a $41 million deal—has us on the verge of declaring a trend. You will recall that last October, AAIPharma purchased another Midwest active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) producer, Cambridge Major Laboratories. All we need is one […]
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2:00 PM | Highly unusual proteinaceous infectious agents probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange
  Prion proteins are implicated in a perplexing class of infectious diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Prion proteins are ubiquitous among mammals with roughly 90% sequence identity across species. TSEs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, AKA mad cow disease.  The disease ontology involves the conversion of the cellular […]

Smirnovas V., Baron G.S., Offerdahl D.K., Raymond G.J., Caughey B. & Surewicz W.K. (2011). Structural organization of brain-derived mammalian prions examined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange, Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 18 (4) 504-506. DOI:

Citation
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1:55 PM | Amusing News Aliquots
Silly samplings from this week’s science news, compiled by Sophia Cai, Bethany Halford, and Jeff Huber. Ever wonder how scientists deciphered the mysteries of reproduction? Did you know frogs in tiny taffeta pants were involved? [Buzz Hoot Roar] Study finds that couples who yawn together, stay together. It’s just the sort of motivation you needed to […]
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1:44 PM | thekidshouldseethis: Imagine sky writing on the ground using...
thekidshouldseethis: Imagine sky writing on the ground using water and a modified tricycle – this is Water Calligraphy Device by French Canadian media artist Nicholas Hanna.  Inspired by the water and brush calligraphy of older artists in his local Beijing parks, Hanna converted a Beijing tricycle, called a san lun che, to digitally “paint” (or more accurately drip) Chinese characters onto the sidewalk. The characters write […]
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1:44 PM | Green Business Plan Competition: Start your engines
The ACS Green Chemistry Institute will be hosting a business plan competition on June 18, 2014 at the 18th Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference, which will be held outside of Washington D.C. The competition is for early stage ideas – but not ideas for renewable energy production or biofuels (there are no shortage of […]
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1:10 PM | Explaining interactions between light, heat, and charge carriers in silicon photonic microresonators
A new analysis accurately describes the behavior of silicon photon microresonators in the nonlinear regime, where the amount of light exiting the system is not directly proportional to the amount of light entering it.
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