Posts

October 03, 2014

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1:44 PM | Carcinogens I've Worked With
The Department of Health and Human Services issued the 13th edition of their Report on Carcinogens this week. The list is not just chemicals, but includes physical hazards such as gamma radiation, and biological agents (hepatitis B and C for instance). I decided to take a look at the list and see what I've exposed myself to over the years. The list is actually split into two categories - those known to be human carcinogens and those reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens. The former is […]
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1:24 PM | Maryland Congressman asks the NIH to fund more young scientists
Maryland Congressman Andrew HarrisNow here's something that you don't get to see everyday - a politician taking (the right kind of) interest in the NIH's activities and asking the agency to support the most important ideas in basic biomedical research by funding young scientists. Maryland Congressman Andrew Harrison's thesis is that whatever money the NIH might have left after all the funding cuts is being spent on scientists in their 40s and beyond; he is mostly alluding to the depressing fact […]
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1:12 PM | Continuous fabrication platform for highly aligned polymer films
Researchers have demonstrated a novel automated fabrication process consisting of a three-step sol-gel extrusion, structure freezing and drying, and mechanical drawing process which results in production of highly aligned polymer films.
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11:32 AM | Coating nanotubes with aluminum oxide lowers risk of lung injury
A new study finds that coating multiwalled carbon nanotubes with aluminum oxide reduces the risk of lung scarring, or pulmonary fibrosis, in mice.
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11:25 AM | Fullerene spheres - nanobearings on the test bench (w/video)
Fullerenes seemed to many an excellent candidate for nano-bearings. Unfortunately, the results so far have been conflicting, calling for further studies. Through a series of computer simulations, scientists uncovered the reason for the experimental discrepancies and shed light on the true potential of this material.
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9:05 AM | A solar cell that stores its own power
Is it a solar cell? Or a rechargeable battery? Actually, this patent-pending device is both: the world's first solar battery.
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8:33 AM | Jenkins-CI: automating lab processes
Our group organizes public Science Cafes where people from Maastricht University can see the research it is involved in. Yesterday it was my turn again, and I gave a presentation showing the BiGCaT and eNanoMapper Jenkins-CI installations (set up by Nuno) which I have been using for a variety of processes which Jenkins conveniently runs based on input it gets.For example, I have it compile and run test suits for a variety of software projects (like the CDK, NanoJava), but also have it build R […]
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5:40 AM | Crumpled graphene could provide an unconventional energy storage
Two-dimensional carbon 'paper' can form stretchable supercapacitors to power flexible electronic devices.
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5:34 AM | Fast, cheap nanomanufacturing
Arrays of tiny conical tips that eject ionized materials could fabricate nanoscale devices cheaply.
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12:04 AM | Publication of the week, number 45, 3rd October 2014
This week I noticed sone gold chemistry from the  Aponick group, at the University of Florida, who reported a useful procedure for controlling the regiochemistry during the synthesis of unsaturated spiroketals. Spiroketals are a structural unit present in many natural products and their synthesis usually constitutes a challenging problem in the grand synthetic scheme. Of course there are […]

October 02, 2014

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7:20 PM | Nanotechnology research partnership between NIOSH and CNSE
NIOSH and CNSE will work together to advance research and guidance for occupational safety and health in the nanoelectronics industry and other settings where workers are potentially exposed to engineered nanomaterials.
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6:09 PM | To Refrigerate, Or Not To Refrigerate? – The Chemistry of Tomatoes
You may have previously come across the advice that tomatoes shouldn’t be refrigerated, but should be stored at room temperature, in order to maximise their flavour. To understand the reasoning behind this, we need to take a look at the chemical compounds that give tomatoes their flavour, and the effect that refrigeration has on the production […]
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6:01 PM | Survivin: You wouldn’t be alive without it
  Enzymes perform numerous tasks in order to contribute to the global goal of organism survival. One such enzyme is Survivin. Survivin wears many “hats” within the cell and is a vital part of cellular homeostasis. Here I will introduce you to two of the main processes Survivin regulates. Survivin is a multifunctional protein involved […]

Johnson M.E. (2004). Survivin: A Bifunctional Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein, Veterinary Pathology, 41 (6) 599-607. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1354/vp.41-6-599

WHEATLEY S. (2005). Survivin: A Protein with Dual Roles in Mitosis and Apoptosis, International Review of Cytology, 247 35-88. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0074-7696(05)47002-3

Tazo Y., Takashi Onda & Makoto Saegusa (2014). Bifunctional roles of survivin-ΔEx3 and survivin-2B for susceptibility to apoptosis in endometrial carcinomas, Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-014-1762-8

Citation
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5:40 PM | Quantum environmentalism
Researchers demonstrate a new type of qubit control, one that actually makes productive use of a qubit's proximity to its surroundings.
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5:20 PM | 40 Years of Cleaner Air: The Evolution of the Autocatalyst
The 40th anniversary of the manufacture of the world’s first commercial batch of autocatalysts for passenger cars at Johnson Matthey Plc’s site in Royston, UK, was marked in May 2014. Despite the enormous progress made in reducing the emission of pollutants from vehicles since the 1970s, there has also been considerable recent discussion about the... The post 40 Years of Cleaner Air: The Evolution of the Autocatalyst appeared first on Johnson Matthey Technology Review.
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2:49 PM | Daily Pump Trap: 10/2/14 edition
Good morning! A few of the recent positions posted at C&EN Jobs:Lebanon, NH: Avitide is searching for a purification process development scientist (all educational levels accepted); looks to be monoclonal antibody-related? (That's a guess, happy to be corrected.) I like this little comment:Avitide proudly promotes a cultural meritocracy and rewards based on intellectual talent and contributions made to the team and organization. "Cultural meritocracy"? I suspect that's "culture of […]
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2:22 PM | Rubber Glove and Ebola
The Atlantic has a an article today about subject that I first wrote about back in August – that polymers, and rubber gloves in particular, play a critical role in the fight against Ebola.The virus itself is thankfully not all that contagious. It is not spread via the air, but rather by direct contact with bodily fluids. A simple rubber glove, just a couple of mils thick, is more than enough protection, and yet sadly, the article notes that such a simple item is missing in many health […]
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1:36 PM | UK Airports and Airport hotels: deficiencies in amenities
I was prompted to write this post having just returned from a holiday in Greece which included staying in an airport hotel at London Gatwick (twice) and spending some considerable time in 2 airports (the other being Thessaloniki). The first point I wanted to make is on the familiar theme of WiFi provision. I regard […]
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12:40 PM | The hidden dangers of HIV
HIV particles swarming the defenses of a macrophageI have written a few times about the myriad obstacles thwarting our efforts to design drugs against pressing medical problems, but perhaps none are as formidable as some of the challenges that evolution itself has set up for us. A disturbing example of this challenge in the context of HIV treatment is described by the husband and wife team of Robert and Janet Siliciano at Johns Hopkins in a recent Science perspective. The article talks about […]
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12:30 PM | Preparing piranha
Piranha solutions are used to remove organic residues f […]Related Posts:Another explosion at Texas Tech and a fire at UCLABeware drying nitrate-containing protic ionic liquidsOPRD safety issueFriday chemical safety round-upUnforgettable reagent moments
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12:15 PM | A new approach to on-chip quantum computing
An international team of researchers is introducing a new method to achieve a different type of photon pair source that fits into the tiny space of a computer chip.
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12:10 PM | Simultaneous imaging of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domains
Researchers have discovered a new way to simultaneously image both the ferromagnetic and the ferroelectric domain structures of multilayer devices in which a ferromagnetic film is grown on a ferroelectric substrate. These structures have attracted significant recent interest due to their ability to efficiently use voltage to change the magnetization in low-energy magnetic devices.
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11:55 AM | Creating nanostructures using simple stamps
Nanostructures of virtually any possible shape can now be made using a combination of techniques. Especially the unique properties of so-called perovskites can be exploited further: their crystal structure is not influenced by the process.
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9:55 AM | Uses of Potassium Hydroxide
Together with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) probably represents the idea of a base in every chemists’ head! From a chemical point of view, it’s an inorganic compound with the formula KOH and commonly known as caustic potash. This compound attracts many industrial applications notably exploring their reactivity with acids and corrosive nature. Structure [...]
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9:17 AM | 40 Years of Cleaner Air: The Evolution of the Autocatalyst
The 40th anniversary of the manufacture of the world’s first commercial batch of autocatalysts for passenger cars at Johnson Matthey Plc’s site in Royston, UK, was marked in May 2014. Despite the enormous progress made in reducing the emission of pollutants from vehicles since the 1970s, there has also been considerable recent discussion about the... The post 40 Years of Cleaner Air: The Evolution of the Autocatalyst appeared first on Johnson Matthey Technology Review.
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7:28 AM | Magnetic nanoparticles make attractive partners in purification processes
Researchers have piloted a novel purification process to dramatically cut the cost of extracting specific biological molecules from complex mixtures - a boost to the competitiveness of Europe's pharmaceutical, food and animal feed industries.
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7:23 AM | Prototype electrical motor uses carbon nanotube yarn in the motor windings (w/video)
Engineers have constructed the world's first electrical motor applying a textile material; carbon nanotube yarn. The presently most electrically conductive carbon nanotube yarn replaces usual copper wires in the windings.
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5:42 AM | Canadian nanotechnology accelerator draws attention to Alberta based research with global award
Ingenuity Lab, Alberta's first nanotechnology accelerator, has been named 'Best Nanotechnology Research Organization 2014' by The New Economy magazine, just under two years after its inception.
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5:36 AM | Nanoparticles for forensic fingerprint detection
A group of researchers from Switzerland has thrown light on the precise mechanisms responsible for the impressive ability of nanoparticles to detect fingermarks left at crime scenes.
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3:00 AM | In the Lab: Towards a Molecular Level Understanding of Electrochemical Interfaces and Electrocatalytic Reactions
Angel Cuesta is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Aberdeen, UK. His research is of interest in the field of materials for electrochemical applications and focuses on combining classical electrochemical techniques, in situ vibrational and optical spectroscopy and in situ scanning probe microscopy to obtain as detailed a description as possible, at the molecular... The post In the Lab: Towards a Molecular Level Understanding of Electrochemical Interfaces and Electrocatalytic Reactions […]
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