Posts

August 19, 2014

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3:41 PM | Chemistry Lit Feature Vol. V
Have you seen a good paper lately? Written one? Send it in and have it featured here! treetownchem@gmail.comTree Town Chemistry is back! After a mostly unintended summer hiatus, I am gearing up to blog throughout the semester once again. What better way to start back than with a literature feature?Before we jump into that, I would like to announce that I will also be blogging for the Rackham Graduate School this semester as part of the Student Voices series. The posts there will be for a […]
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3:36 PM | Future smartphones to use blood and speech to monitor HIV, stress, nutrition
David Erickson, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University, will receive a $3 million National Science Foundation grant over five years to adapt smart phones for health monitoring.
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3:32 PM | Watching nanoparticles swim
Researchers collaborate to see particles in real time in their native environment.
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3:32 PM | How do Nanoparticles Enter Cells?
There is an ovarian cancer drug called DOXIL that is delivered to cells in a nanoparticle made of molecules of fat. But, how does the nanoparticle enter the cell? According to a recent study that uses computers to model this process, there are mainly 3 ways in which scientists think a nanoparticle can enter the […]
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3:31 PM | The “Hazardous” Chemistry of E-waste
It’s so easy to forget when you get a new shiny phone, what can be lurking inside this cool polished look. The fact that some toxic compounds are used in the manufacture of electronic devices is not new. For example, in 2011, 137 Chinese workers needed hospitalisation to treat n-hexane poisoning, after complaining of sweaty [...]
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3:14 PM | Electrical engineers take major step toward optical computing
Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light.
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3:10 PM | Organic photovoltaic cells of the future
Researchers use charge formation efficiency to screen materials for future devices.
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1:17 PM | The Death Ray returns to my backyard
Back in February I wrote about the Death Ray that I had in my back yard. This Death Ray is formed from sunlight reflecting off of the curved panes of glass on the south facing windows of the house. Back in February, the curvature concentrated the sunlight enough that it could melt snow, even though the sun was fairly low in the sky and the air temperature was only 10 oF.6 months later, the Death Ray has returned. Now that the weather here in Minnesota has gone from extremely wet (and cloudy) to […]
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1:16 PM | Training the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists
New grant supports Northeastern University co-ops in cancer nanomedicine.
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12:59 PM | Researchers make an important step towards creating medical nanorobots
Scientists discovered a way of enabling nano- and microparticles to produce logical calculations using a variety of biochemical reactions.
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11:40 AM | Graphene rubber bands could stretch limits of current healthcare, new research finds
New research identifies a new type of sensor that can monitor body movements and could help revolutionise healthcare.
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10:51 AM | Nanotechnology in the security systems
The topics discussed at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop 'Nanotechnology in the Security Systems' included nanophysics, nanotechnology, nanomaterials, sensors, biosensors security systems, explosive detection.
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10:29 AM | Scientists describe a hybrid laminate material with magnetic and photoactive properties
New research confirms for the first time the possibility of modulating the magnetic properties of an inorganic material through organic photoactive molecules activated by light.
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10:25 AM | Multimillion-dollar grant helps researchers shed light on ultrafast dynamics
Physicists and computer scientists are involved in a collaborative project to understand a long-lasting mystery: how light interacts with matter.
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9:06 AM | Using Swarm and the new Foursquare app
I promised an update on using Swarm/Foursquare, and since I’ve been doing some travelling on the last week or so, I’ve had a chance to put both apps through their paces. The first point is that I don’t use the actual Foursquare app much. I check in to places using Swarm, and only go into […]
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9:05 AM | Scientists unveil new technology to better understand small clusters of atoms
Physicists have developed new technology to study atomic vibration in small particles, revealing a more accurate picture of the structure of atomic clusters where surface atoms vibrate more intensively than internal atoms.
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8:46 AM | Electronic 'noses' to detect chemical warfare gases
Researchers have developed a prototype of electronic 'nose' for the detection of chemical warfare gases, fundamentally nerve gases (Sarin, Soman and Tabun).
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8:40 AM | Follow that cell - NIH $500k challenge for single-cell tracking
The National Institutes of Health is challenging science innovators to compete for prizes totaling up to $500,000, by developing new ways to track the health status of a single cell in complex tissue over time.
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8:25 AM | Self-powered micropumps respond to glucose levels
Researchers have demonstrated an active glucose-responsive self-powered fluidic pump based on transesterification reaction of acyclic diol boronate with glucose. The scientific principle of the project is to use well-known glucose/boronate chemistry to design a self-powered micropump device. Instead of synthesizing some new molecules with glucose/boronate reaction, a miniature pump utilizes the energy of this chemical reaction and pumps drugs when glucose levels are high.
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7:03 AM | DNA impedance biosensor for the early detection of cancer
Materials engineers fabricated a new nanobiosensor for the early diagnosis of cancer.
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6:58 AM | Engineering new bone growth
Nanocoated tissue scaffolds help the body grow new bone to repair injuries or congenital defects.
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2:48 AM | Beauty: K2-Induced Seizures
This post is part of a collaborative narrative series composed of my writing and Chris Arnade’s photos exploring issues of addiction, poverty, prostitution and urban anthropology in Hunts... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Editor's Pick

August 18, 2014

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8:24 PM | Researchers inspired by marine life to design camouflage systems
Researchers have developed a technology that allows a material to automatically read its environment and adapt to mimic its surrounding. The system is inspired by the skins of cephalopods, a class of marine animals which can change coloration quickly, both for camouflage and as a form of warning.
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7:17 PM | Nanotechnology interns tackle tough questions at CNSE
Nearly 60 students worked one-on-one with SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering professors over the past 10 weeks to gain hands-on experience.
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7:11 PM | Bacterial nanowires: Not what we thought they were
Scientists have discovered that bacterial nanowires (which conduct electricity, allowing certain bacteria to breathe) are actually extensions of the bacteria's outer membrane - not pili, as originally thought.
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3:42 PM | This week's C&EN
Some interesting articles here:I had no idea that Sally Evans (Dave Evans' wife) was responsible for ChemDraw; it's really a remarkable #altchemjobs story, when you get down to it. (story by Bethany Halford)Someone doesn't like that C&EN has a paywall. I'm still finding the rail car safety debate fascinating - DOT wants DOT-111 tankcars retrofitted and that's catching the ethanol industry by surprise. I think I'm okay with this, but I understand why folks who own these cars are […]
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3:22 PM | Asylum Research Receives the 2014 Microscopy Today Innovation Award for blueDrive Photothermal Excitation
Asylum Research has received the prestigious 2014 Microscopy Today Innovation Award for the development of blueDrive Photothermal Excitation. blueDrive, an option available exclusively for Asylum's Cypher Atomic Force Microscopes, makes tapping mode imaging remarkably simple, incredibly stable, and strikingly accurate.
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1:30 PM | 9 Activities that BOTH Academic Researchers and Industrial Researchers Perform
Once again, another tired editorial from another academic editor, which much like a previous editorial from another academic bemoans the difficulties of finding academic peer reviewers for their journals (and grant proposals).I've suggested in the past that journals branch out to industrial researchers as we not only outnumber academic researchers by a factor likely on the order of 25, but we are still not close to being tapped out. But what is even more maddening about this editorial is that […]
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1:26 PM | Molecular learning machines under the microscope
Neurotransmitters play an important role in the communication of nerve cells. Major details of the processes involved have been unclear until recently. Scientists have now shed light on these processes by using a new technique.
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11:08 AM | Carbon nanotubes and near-infrared lasers promise a cost effective solution for cell membrane manipulation
Researchers have developed a new, targeted method for perforating cell membranes in order to deliver drugs to, or manipulate the genes of, individual cells.
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