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Posts

April 11, 2014

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10:41 AM | Video: Water Purification Process
During November 2013, my company ReAgent took delivery of a brand new water storage tank which holds 18,500 litres of high quality, deionised water. The tank was a way of ensuring we could meet increasing demands for deionised water, as well as fill huge containers, even road tankers. The storage tank was connected to our [...]
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10:14 AM | Additive manufacturing approach (3D printing) with nanoparticles
Researchers have created a technique called light-directed electrophoretic deposition, which uses photoconductive electrodes and DC electrical fields to dynamically and arbitrarily pattern 3D nanocomposite material.
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10:10 AM | Friday Fun: Insane in the Membrane
...CARBORANES in the Brain!*Source: ACS Chemical Neuroscience | Sydney University From the pages of the (relatively new) journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, comes this report about development of new antidepressants with rather...interesting appendages. The adamantyl (1) and Cookson's diketone (3) molecules shouldn't surprise, but the rest? You're not imagining things - those are blood-brain barrier-penetrant lead molecules based on cubane (2) and closo- and […]
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9:43 AM | Friday Fun: Happy Birthday, Percy
Today's Google Doodle honors the 115th birthday of Percy Julian, chemical entrepreneur and first to synthesize physostigmine:Note that, with the exception of the (ugh) "resonance circle" of the aromatic core, that physo structure is spot on! Ditto cortisone, on the left, for which Julian developed one of the first commercial-scale processes.Want more? This NOVA special tells it well (thanks, Dr. Ru!). Highly recommended.
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8:00 AM | Exciting summer intern opportunities at the Royal Society of Chemistry!
Applications are now open for our intern placements over the summer months. We currently have two opportunities open to applications.    The first is as a Publishing Intern working in our Editorial Production department. This opportunity allows you to gain an insight into the full Publishing process from initial submission to final publication. This role in particular will focus on the publication process post acceptance, specifically applying author corrections and committing […]
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7:30 AM | What is Iron Sulphate? Ferrous Sulphate vs. Ferric Sulphate
When referring to iron sulphate it’s important to define the oxidation state of the iron atom. This value can range from -2 to +6, but the most common forms are +2 (Fe2+) and +3 (Fe3+). This originates iron(II) sulphate – also known as ferrous sulphate, with the formula FeSO4 – and iron(III) sulphate – also [...]
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7:12 AM | A quick chill releases magnetic frustration
The delicate interplay between electronic properties and crystal structure explains how 'frustrated' magnets escape magnetic deadlock at low temperatures.
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7:06 AM | Individual carbon nanotubes go under the microscope
Ultrahigh-resolution optical imaging of individual carbon nanotubes is now possible under user-friendly conditions.
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12:10 AM | A friendly note from the FDA
Via Pharma Manufacturing, Reuters has some tough news about GSK's API manufacturing facility (emphasis mine):The U.S. FDA issued a warning letter to GlaxoSmithKline after determining that GSK did not take sufficient action to resolve problems after contaminated APIs were found at the drugmaker's Ireland manufacturing plant. The contaminated ingredient, paroxetine, is used to make antidepressant drugs Paxil and Seroxat. During an October inspection, an FDA investigator reported that […]

April 10, 2014

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11:47 PM | Publication of the week, number 21, 11th April 2014
The Baran group published the complete account of their total synthesis of ingenol and it is really worth a read. Also from the same group is an account of the synthesis of the antibacterial Dixiamycin B using an unusual electrochemical oxidation to make a N-N bond leading to a dimeric alkaloid. Now I must admit […]
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6:02 PM | Figuring out why cells don’t burst
Why don’t cells swell up with water and burst? For 30 years, scientists have known that there is an ion channel dedicated to regulating the volume of a cell, but its molecular identity has been a mystery. In a paper just out in the journal Cell, researchers identified an essential component of this channel. Water […]
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5:23 PM | Plastic Logic shows a flexible OLED display for wearable devices
Plastic Logic demonstrated a flexible AMOLED display at Printed Electronics Europe. The flexible device is the direct result of a recently announced collaboration with Novaled, a supplier of OLED materials.
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5:19 PM | 'NanoDay in Buffalo' introduces 450 students to opportunities in nanotechnology
The students obtained an up-close look at the 21st Century science that is driving technological progress by taking part in a number of engaging presentations, nano-enabled demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Students also learned about the cutting-edge initiatives that are leading to a growing number of nanotechnology-based careers.
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4:51 PM | The dumbest thing you will read all day
Via John Spevacek, this WSJ op-ed on the lack of petroleum engineering departments in elite universities contains an absolutely ahistorical statement (emphasis mine): The oil and gas industry has been historically volatile and marked by boom-and-bust cycles caused by fluctuating commodity prices, with company prospects often tied to hit-or-miss exploratory drilling. Not surprisingly, the industry has struggled with periodic brain drain since the 1980s as students looking for steady […]
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4:22 PM | Job postings from all around
From the inbox, lots of job postings:Pleasanton, CA: CooperVision is looking for an experienced M.S./Ph.D. chemist to be a senior scientist working new materials for contact lenses. (5+ years for Ph.D. candidate, 12+ years for M.S.)South San Francisco and Markham, ON, CA: A variety of sales and technical positions at Fluidigm, in the United States and around the world (including a number of chemistry positions in Canada.) Sounds really interesting.Boston, MA: Looks like Ensemble […]
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4:03 PM | Thermoelectric generator on glass fabric for wearable electronic devices
Researchers have developed a glass fabric-based thermoelectric generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm.
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3:58 PM | Invitation to the 10th International Conference On Physics Of Advanced Materials
This event is intended to be a forum of physicists, chemists, material scientists, physicians, engineers and artists for discussion and exchange of ideas and results, both in fundamental and applied research of advanced materials and will consist of invited and contributed papers during plenary, oral and poster sessions.
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3:55 PM | Emerging research suggests a new paradigm for 'unconventional superconductors'
An international team of scientists has reported the first experimental observation of the quantum critical point (QCP) in the extensively studied 'unconventional superconductor' TiSe2, finding that it does not reside as predicted within the superconducting dome of the phase diagram, but rather at a full GPa higher in pressure.
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3:54 PM | Another poster prize up for grabs – this time at ISACS13
The 13th conference in the highly successful International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences (ISACS) series is taking place in Dublin, Ireland, this July and there’s still time to submit a poster abstract. Extensive poster sessions will form a key part of the symposium and Chemistry World is delighted to be sponsoring a prize for [...]
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3:47 PM | Art and Science International Photo Contest
This contest addresses to all amateur/professional photographers and scientists. Any science related image is eligible for competition.
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3:24 PM | Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles
Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. It occurs in gemstones and snowflakes and even in biology, an area typically associated with complexity and diversity. There are striking examples: the shapes of virus particles, such as those causing the common cold, are highly symmetrical and look like tiny footballs.
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3:19 PM | Sunlight generates hydrogen in new porous silicon
Porous silicon manufactured in a bottom up procedure using solar energy can be used to generate hydrogen from water, according to a team of Penn State mechanical engineers, who also see applications for batteries, biosensors and optical electronics as outlets for this new material.
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3:03 PM | Daily Pump Trap: 4/10/14 edition
Good morning. For now, a smattering of postings from C&EN Jobs that are interesting and/or relevant: Synthetic biochemistry?: GSK has a very interesting posting for organic chemists of a certain bent:We are investing heavily in new technologies for the manufacture of our drugs under an initiative termed Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT). Among these technologies the Synthetic Biochemistry team (a cross-divisional, cross-scientific function, global team) is seeking to develop […]
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12:58 PM | Toward new tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scale
Scientists propose a scheme to probe non-classical states of macroscopic systems.
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12:44 PM | Tell Me What You Really Feel
Brutal honesty makes for shocking conversation, and even more so when it comes from a politician (after all, they are permanently running for re-election). Diane Savino, a state senator from New York recently let loose on a proposal in New York City to charge 10 cents for plastic bags at the checkout, with people on public assistance being exempt from the charge. And she did it on Facebook for all the world to see."i have already called my councilman and told him to vote NO. it is not the 10 […]
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12:23 PM | Has Tamiflu got a cold?
I wrote this post last year about the problems with Tamiflu. Now it seems that the problems are still around. According to a BBC news report The Cochrane Collaboration claims the drug did not prevent the spread of flu or reduce dangerous complications, and only slightly helped symptoms. The consequence of this is that if they are […]
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12:23 PM | Surface-modified nanocellulose hydrogels for wound dressing
Nanocellulose from wood is a promising nanomaterial with potential applications as a substrate for printing electronics, filtration, or biomedicine. Researchers have now reported on a method to control the surface chemistry of nanocellulose. They fabricated nanocellulose gels that have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment. This material could be of great interest for critical wound healing applications.
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11:15 AM | Science at play: NSF funds university research on nanotechnology ethics, education
ASU undergraduates have the opportunity to enroll in a challenging course this fall, designed to re-introduce the act of play as a problem-solving technique. The course is offered as part of the larger project, Cross-disciplinary Education in Social and Ethical Aspects of Nanotechnology, which received nearly $200,000 from the National Science Foundation?s Nano Undergraduate Education program.
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11:09 AM | Creating self-assembling nanoparticle films with a common spray gun
Researchers have developed a simple approach of applying a surface coating of thin, flat nanoplatelets using a common spray gun, such as can be purchased off-the-shelf from an art supply store, to create a surface coating in which nanoplatelets spontaneously self-assemble into 'nano-walls'. The nano-walls act as rigid barriers that prevent oxygen gas from reaching the surface, and are effective at low and high humidity levels.
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8:29 AM | Researchers develop method to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch
Researchers have developed a system with which molecular-scale mechanical stimuli can be exerted on a single cell.
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