Posts

April 16, 2015

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10:04 PM | The geneticist and the biochemist
The geneticist and the biochemist: Geneticist William Sullivan and biochemist Douglas Kellogg both study the regulatory mechanisms whose failure turn cells cancerous at UCSC. The sparring they began years ago lives on in a tongue-in-cheek parable Sullivan published in the 1990s, which Kellogg countered with his own version, linked above, later reported on in the UCSC Review. The stories have been widely reprinted and posted on numerous academic web sites. Sullivan has even been asked to […]
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9:50 PM | Spot-Checking Antibacterials in PLoS One
Ever looked at a molecule and thought something was just...off?A little while ago, I browsed through the latest edition of PLoS One, the open science journal. I don't often go there for chemistry publications, but curiosity struck, so I typed, "antibacterial NMR" (I think) into the search box. Up came this paper, from 2013, announcing:A novel alkaloid, xinghaiamine A, isolated from a marine bacterium, that...Had novel structural features, such as a sulfoxide and acenaphthylene ring, rarely […]
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8:17 PM | Presidential Chemists
From an astute commenter in the 2015-2016 Bumper Cars post, we hear about Prof. Andrew Hamilton's appointment to serve as the next President of New York University (NYU). Congrats!I'm sure chemblogosphere NYU alums Phil Baran and ChemBark are overjoyed.Readers, how many chemists now serve as chancellors, provosts, or presidents at academic institutions?Here's who I know about today - I'll add more as I hear about them in the comments.John D. Simon - Lehigh UniversityAndrew Hamilton - New […]
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6:49 PM | C&EN request for stories of infertility
From the inbox:Nobody likes to talk about infertility, but it’s a growing problem, especially among busy professionals who are putting off starting a family to start their careers. Once they start down the path of infertility treatments, however, it can be financially draining and take an emotional toll.C&EN senior editor Linda Wang is looking for chemists (both male and female) willing to share their experiences with infertility and what impact it’s had on their lives and […]
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5:58 PM | LS intro and LS stage notes
This post is a compilation of notes that I have on the LS (large sample) intro and specimen stage used on older PHI 5400 and 5600 LS systems. To Replace the LS Intro Ribbon: First remove the 4 screws that … Continue reading → The post LS intro and LS stage notes appeared first on RBD TechSpot.
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5:43 PM | Nanowire-bacteria hybrids perform solar-powered green chemistry with captured CO2
A potentially game-changing breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis has been achieved with the development of a system that can capture carbon dioxide emissions before they are vented into the atmosphere and then, powered by solar energy, convert that carbon dioxide into valuable chemical products, including biodegradable plastics, pharmaceutical drugs and even liquid fuels.
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5:15 PM | Why Shouldn’t You Eat Rhubarb Leaves? – The Chemistry of Rhubarb
  Field-grown rhubarb will shortly be coming into season and appearing in supermarkets in the UK, so it seems like a good time to take a look at the chemistry behind this odd-looking vegetable. It’s mostly used in pies and desserts, but it’s only the stalks of the plant that we eat – and there’s […]
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3:19 PM | The most brutally honest sentence I read today
I've been reading Daniel Drezner (professor of international political economy at Tufts) for a very long time. This was a very interesting statement on his part:The first is that if your goal is to become a professor and you are not accepted with a scholarship into a top-20 political science program, I would not in good conscience recommend that you get a PhD.Most of the professoriate in international relations comes from the elite schools. Whether this is because these schools function as a […]
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3:01 PM | Model systems may share adaptations for rapid development...
Model systems may share adaptations for rapid development that are not present in more slowly developing species. One form of embryonic adaptation for rapid development is prepatterning in the egg. Maternal loading of the egg removes the constraint on speed that would be imposed if the embryo had to synthesize all the necessary proteins, including ribosomes, de novo However, this strategy introduces other kinds of constraints: for example, it provides a wide scope for maternal regulation of […]
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2:59 PM | An electronic micropump to deliver treatments deep within the brain
For a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. For this reason, researchers have developed an organic electronic micropump which, when combined with an anti-convulsant drug, enables localized inhibition of epileptic seizure in brain tissue in vitro.
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2:46 PM | Nobelist John Pople on using theories and models the right way
John Pople was a towering figure in theoretical and computational chemistry. He contributed to several aspects of the field, meticulously consolidated those aspects into rigorous computer algorithms for the masses and received a Nobel for his efforts. The Gaussianset of programs that he pioneered is now a mainstay of almost every lab in the world which does any kind of molecular calculation at the quantum level.On the website of Gaussian is a tribute to Pople from his former student (and […]
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2:24 PM | Three Reasons Why Moore’s Law Might Be Doomed
On April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore published a prediction that would shape the computer industry for the next 50 years: every year the number of transistors that fit on a microchip will double. (A transistor is basically an electric switch that allows a computer chip to make calculations.) In 1975 he revised this rate to every two years. So far Moore has been right. However, many computer scientists and engineers believe that Moore’s prediction has become a self-fulfilling prophesy. The […]
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1:48 PM | Top 10 pH Meters on Amazon
What is a pH meter? A pH meter is a widely-used piece of electronic equipment, used to measure the pH of a substance. The pH measurement indicates how acidic or alkaline a substance is; pH 0-6 indicates an acidic substance, while substances with a pH of 7-14 are alkaline. pH 0 is neutral (i.e. pure [...]
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12:59 PM | Protein building blocks for nanosystems
Scientists develop method for producing bio-based materials with new properties.
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12:20 PM | A 'pin ball machine' for atoms and photons
A team of physicists proposes the combination of nanophotonics with ultracold atoms for simulating quantum many-body systems and creating new states of matter.
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10:20 AM | Crowdfunding could be a simple way to pay for science research
The outcome of science research benefits us all, but knowledge doesn't come cheap. Crowdfunding - promoted by government incentives - may be the best way to meet these costs and garner greater awareness of scientific research priorities.

April 15, 2015

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11:55 PM | Encore, Encore!
Two hot areas of research served up second helpings online this week:C-H Azidation: Remember John Hartwig's iron-meets hypervalent iodide combination from last March? It possessed the power to insert a late-stage amine equivalent into complex natural products. John Groves has raised the stakes, disclosing a "practical and complementary" Mn-porphyrin promoted version that takes solid sodium azide as the precursor. Source: Groves, JACS ASAPThe group finds it can enable late-stage […]
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11:36 PM | The vault Vaults are among the largest cytoplasmic...
The vault Vaults are among the largest cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles, and are found in many eukaryotes. Their name holds a reference to the ceilings found in gothic cathedrals, whose symmetry has long captivated structural biologists. The cellular function of vaults remains unclear — this structure was only worked out 5 years ago, with each half-vault (above) comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural […]
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8:00 PM | Johnson Matthey Highlights: April 2015
EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES Is Reactor Light-Off Data Sufficiently Discriminating Between Kinetic Parameters to be Used for Developing Kinetic Models of Automotive Exhaust Aftertreatment Catalysts? The Effect of Hysteresis Induced by Strong Self Inhibition J. E. Etheridge and T. C. Watling, Chem. Eng. J., 2015, 264, 376 LINK http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2014.11.089 Kinetic parameters used to predict CO oxidation... The post Johnson Matthey Highlights: April 2015 appeared first on Johnson […]
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8:00 PM | Platinum Investment Casting, Part II: Alloy Optimisation by Thermodynamic Simulation and Experimental Verification
Two widely used jewellery investment casting alloys (platinum with 5 wt% ruthenium (Pt-5Ru) and platinum with 5 wt% cobalt (Pt-5Co)) suffer from poor castability and other drawbacks. In this work thermodynamic calculations of alloy properties were employed to optimise the alloy compositions. Segregation behaviour appeared to be important for the melting range. Scheil simulations were used to simulate segregation under typical casting conditions. Based on these simulation results, small […]
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5:05 PM | Ronald Bentley (1999) Secondary Metabolite Biosynthesis: The...
Ronald Bentley (1999) Secondary Metabolite Biosynthesis: The First Century. Critical Reviews in Biotechnology, 19(1):1–40 Later on Bentley raises problems with the word biomimetic, as used in ‘biomimetics: a branch of biology that uses information from biological systems to develop synthetic systems”, but generally equivalent to “biosynthetic- (biogenetic)-type, pseudo-physiologiques, biosynthetically (biogenetically)-modeled, etc.” examples of organic synthesis […]
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3:59 PM | So just how many polymer chemists are there?
While polymers have touched just about all aspects of our lives, you might be tempted to think that most chemists work with them. While it is true that all working chemists do to some degree, i.e., they wear plastic safety glasses and rubber gloves, I want to probe the subject just a little more deeply and ask: what percentage of chemists work in the development and/or manufacturing of polymers?This is surprisingly difficult to answer. My own personal perspective sans data is that very few do. […]
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3:22 PM | How Can You See an Atom? – ACS Reactions Video
Here at Sustainable Nano, we’ve published several posts talking about the instrumentation used by researchers in the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology to visualize nanoparticles and cell membranes, such as atomic force microscopy and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. For this week’s post, we’re sharing a video produced by the American Chemical Society‘s Reactions series, called “How Can You See an Atom?” The […]
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3:00 PM | "We might want to think about speaking of ‘hydrophobic interaction’ at small scales but a..."
“We might want to think about speaking of ‘hydrophobic interaction’ at small scales but a ‘solvophobic interaction’ at large scales.” - Philip Ball, explaining Remsing and Weeks’ 2015 paper: Dissecting Hydrophobic Hydration and Association. We use appropriately defined short ranged reference models of liquid water to clarify the different roles local hydrogen bonding, van der Waals attractions, and long ranged electrostatic interactions play in the […]
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2:48 PM | Light in a spin
Light must travel in a straight line and at a constant speed, or so the laws of nature suggest. Now, researchers have demonstrated that laser light traveling along a helical path through space, can accelerate and decelerate as it spins into the distance.
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2:44 PM | Cobalt film a clean-fuel find
A cobalt-based thin film serves double duty as a new catalyst that produces both hydrogen and oxygen from water to feed fuel cells.
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2:39 PM | Carbon nanotube sensor detects spoiled meat
Chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat.
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2:34 PM | Combined effort for structural determination
Combining powder diffraction data with electron crystallography can give us a clearer view of modulated structures.
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2:14 PM | SAE 2014 Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium
1. Introduction The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) 2014 Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Control Symposium was, like its predecessors, hosted in Gothenburg, Sweden. This biennial two-day event attracted around 160 delegates. Most of the delegates (>95%) came from catalyst system and component suppliers as well as original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). A few delegates came from academia,... The post SAE 2014 Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium appeared first on Johnson Matthey […]
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2:14 PM | Moore and the Microprocessor
Gordon Moore first published the article containing what would become his namesake law 50 years ago this week. At the time he was serving as research director at Fairchild Semiconductor. Fairchild had pioneered the development of the modern microchip, which replaced the discrete components used in earlier electronic equipment with a single piece of silicon chemically etched with multiple transistors. As head of R&D, Moore oversaw Fairchild’s push to reduce the size—and increase […]
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