Posts

August 21, 2014

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6:11 AM | Neue Messtechnik für Nanostrukturen
Zwei elektrische Isolatoren aneinander bringen und dadurch einen elektrischen Supraleiter erzeugen: Wer solche Phänomene in Nanostrukturen analysieren will, stößt schnell an messtechnische Grenzen - es sei denn, er benutzt eine neue Methode, die Würzburger Physiker mitentwickelt haben.
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6:02 AM | Novel method for studying the structure of hydrogenated graphene
This computational method reduces the need for the use of expensive and costly devices and decreases the time of tests.
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5:57 AM | New nanotheranostic platform packs a three-in-one punch
A combination of three modes of therapy - photodynamic therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy - integrated into a single platform, it is hoped that this treatment would increase treatment efficacy and reduce side effects for cancer patients.

August 20, 2014

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7:41 PM | A new hope for Parkinson’s disease …?
First of all I’d like to dedicate this blog post to my late uncle who was a victim of Parkinson’s disease. May he rest in peace…Parkinson’s disease was discovered by James Parkinson in 1867 and had initially called it “Shaking palsey”. Parkinson’s is the 2nd most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s, and can be identified by shaking hands (tremor), rigidity and posture instability; cased by the loss of neurons in the Substantia […]
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5:01 PM | My thought of the day, Mary McCarthy version
Every word that guy says needed to be checked, including 'and' and 'the'. - CJliterary context here
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3:07 PM | Uses of Phosphoric Acid: from fertiliser to anti-nausea medication
In simple terms, you can say phosphoric acid is a weak inorganic acid with the formula H3PO4. However, it’s not as simple as it may seem … and phosphoric acid needs to be seen as a family and not an individual compound. In this family, the simplest “member” is referred to as orthophosphoric acid and [...]
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2:57 PM | Is blue-tinted glass good for your health? Augustus James...
Is blue-tinted glass good for your health? Augustus James Pleasonton, a general in the American Civil War, certainly believed so. In 1876 he  published The Influence of the Blue Ray of the Sunlight and of the Blue Color of the Sky. In this audio clip, Doug Mooney, senior archaeologist at URS Corporation and president of the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum, describes how his team dug up a pipe bowl during an archaeological survey of I-95 in Philadelphia. The pipe bowl was completely […]
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2:57 PM | Is blue-tinted glass good for your health? Augustus James...
Is blue-tinted glass good for your health? Augustus James Pleasonton, a general in the American Civil War, certainly believed so. In 1876 he  published The Influence of the Blue Ray of the Sunlight and of the Blue Color of the Sky. In this audio clip, Doug Mooney, senior archaeologist at URS Corporation and president of the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum, describes how his team dug up a pipe bowl during an archaeological survey of I-95 in Philadelphia. The pipe bowl was completely […]
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2:02 PM | Why is recycling plastics so confusing?
The Society of the Plastics Industry (SPI) has a blog called "In the Hopper" which just yesterday had a nice review of the history of the SPI recycling codes, those little symbols with the numbers 1 through 7 and the chasing arrows.The blog also discusses the confusion that the public has over the symbols, something that I have been baffled by in the past.What always seems to be missing from these discussion about recycling confusion however, is any mention that all plastic recycling is local. […]
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1:30 PM | Nanoparticles in sunblock pose potential hazard to sea life
When sunbathers splash into the ocean to cool off, some of their lotions and creams get rinsed into the water. The problem is that titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles, which are common ingredients in sunblock, can react with ultraviolet light from the sun and form new compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide, that could be toxic.
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12:31 PM | Say it with flowers and nanotechnology
Cut flowers last longer with silver nanoparticles.
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10:05 AM | Entrepreneurial graphene scientist sets up a standards service
A University of Manchester graphene scientist has won a prestigious award for his business proposal to set up a standards service for the one-atom thick material.
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9:30 AM | Quantum Materials Acquires Bayer Technology Services Quantum Dot Manufacturing and QD Solar Cell Patents
Quantum Materials Corporation today announced the purchase of five diverse sets of patent families from Bayer Technology Services GmbH, the global technological backbone and major innovation driver for Bayer AG of Leverkusen, Germany.
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9:15 AM | The nanochannel that relaxes DNA
A simple and effective way of unravelling the often tangled mass of DNA is to 'thread' the strand into a nano-channel. A new study used simulations to measure the characteristics that this channel should have in order to achieve maximum efficiency.
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9:08 AM | Turning nanoporous metal into a nanopump by electrically controlling surface tension
The capillarity-driven uptake of liquids by porous solids can be experienced in daily life, e.g., when a sponge or fabric absorbs water. This spontaneous imbibition or capillary rise phenomenon is also one of the most vivid manifestations of the capillarity of liquids: surface tension. Researchers have now demonstrated a strategy for achieving control over the imbibition kinetics. They show that this process can be switched on and off reversibly when nanoporous gold takes the role of the sponge […]
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6:35 AM | Vibrational motion of a single molecule measured in real time
For the first time, chemists have succeeded in measuring vibrational motion of a single molecule with a femtosecond time resolution. The study reveals how vibration of a single molecule differs from the behaviour of larger molecular groups.

August 19, 2014

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7:17 PM | Moxtek Introduces the Next Generation Polarizing Nanowire Beamsplitter Cube
Moxtek introduces the ICE Cube, a new Nanowire polarizing beamsplitter cube optimized for a wide range of acceptance angles, while maintaining color uniformity and image contrast in the visible wavelength range.
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5:01 PM | Moving single cells around - accurately and cheaply
Scientists have figured out how to pick up and transfer single cells using a pipette - a common laboratory tool that's been tweaked slightly.
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4:50 PM | EBRD quits Rusnano investment project
The EBRD has quit the Rosnano project over sanctions imposed by the European Union on Russia.
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4:01 PM | Bubbling down: Discovery suggests surprising uses for common bubbles
In a finding with scientific and industrial applications, researchers find that bursting bubbles can push tiny particles down into a liquid as well as up into the air.
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3:42 PM | Peter Cappelli on the skills gap
Peter Cappelli is a Wharton School professor and the author of Why Good People Can't Get Jobs. He has written a long National Bureau of Economic Research working paper on the so-called "skills gap." It's worth noting that Professor Cappelli is a 'skills gap' skeptic. Here's a small excerpt:More generally, if the labor market is not enticing students to pursue particular fields, should public policy push them to do so? Manufacturers, for example, have long complained about the shortage of […]
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3:41 PM | Chemistry Lit Feature Vol. V
Have you seen a good paper lately? Written one? Send it in and have it featured here! treetownchem@gmail.comTree Town Chemistry is back! After a mostly unintended summer hiatus, I am gearing up to blog throughout the semester once again. What better way to start back than with a literature feature?Before we jump into that, I would like to announce that I will also be blogging for the Rackham Graduate School this semester as part of the Student Voices series. The posts there will be for a […]
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3:36 PM | Future smartphones to use blood and speech to monitor HIV, stress, nutrition
David Erickson, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University, will receive a $3 million National Science Foundation grant over five years to adapt smart phones for health monitoring.
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3:32 PM | Watching nanoparticles swim
Researchers collaborate to see particles in real time in their native environment.
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3:32 PM | How do Nanoparticles Enter Cells?
There is an ovarian cancer drug called DOXIL that is delivered to cells in a nanoparticle made of molecules of fat. But, how does the nanoparticle enter the cell? According to a recent study that uses computers to model this process, there are mainly 3 ways in which scientists think a nanoparticle can enter the […]
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3:31 PM | The “Hazardous” Chemistry of E-waste
It’s so easy to forget when you get a new shiny phone, what can be lurking inside this cool polished look. The fact that some toxic compounds are used in the manufacture of electronic devices is not new. For example, in 2011, 137 Chinese workers needed hospitalisation to treat n-hexane poisoning, after complaining of sweaty [...]
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3:14 PM | Electrical engineers take major step toward optical computing
Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light.
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3:10 PM | Organic photovoltaic cells of the future
Researchers use charge formation efficiency to screen materials for future devices.
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1:17 PM | The Death Ray returns to my backyard
Back in February I wrote about the Death Ray that I had in my back yard. This Death Ray is formed from sunlight reflecting off of the curved panes of glass on the south facing windows of the house. Back in February, the curvature concentrated the sunlight enough that it could melt snow, even though the sun was fairly low in the sky and the air temperature was only 10 oF.6 months later, the Death Ray has returned. Now that the weather here in Minnesota has gone from extremely wet (and cloudy) to […]
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1:16 PM | Training the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists
New grant supports Northeastern University co-ops in cancer nanomedicine.
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