Posts

October 16, 2014

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12:07 PM | New project looks at aircraft materials defects micro- and nanoscale levels
UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts.
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12:03 PM | Nanotechnology researchers synthesize two-element atomic chain inside carbon nanotube
Researchers have synthesized an atomic chain in which two elements are aligned alternately and have evaluated its physical properties on an atomic level.
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9:10 AM | Controlling the size and shape of graphene-based multilayer structures
Researchers have developed a novel yet simple technique, called 'diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly', to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors.
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8:59 AM | Cleansing the ionic impurities in LCDs with nanoparticles
Impurities during the production process of liquid crystal devices result in mobile ions that influence the LCs' field-induced switching phenomena, resulting in a phenomenon called image sticking, or ghosting. Researchers now have developed a method to reduce the presence of excess ions by doping LCDs with ferroelectric nanoparticles. They demonstrate that this reduction of free ions has coherent impacts on the LC's conductivity, rotational viscosity, and electric field-induced nematic […]
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5:50 AM | New molecular probe tracks cellular forces
Method could advance biology and spur new approaches to disease.
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1:16 AM | On Freeman Dyson, cadmium estimation and the joy of chemistry
Cadmium sulfide (the solution has a muchdeeper, brilliant yellow color)Freeman Dyson who is a hero of mine and who I have had the privilege of meeting at length several times is someone who has done a lot of interesting things during a long and fruitful life. Not only has he made brilliant, foundational contributions to many areas of mathematics, physics, engineering and astronomy but he has also written books showcasing elegant, wide-ranging, poetic prose.If you look at Dyson's […]

October 15, 2014

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9:28 PM | Job posting: Medicinal chemist (Basel, Switzerland) and process chemist (Plymouth, MN)
From the inbox, a B.S./M.S./Ph.D. process development position at Cargill in Plymouth, MN:This position is predominantly technical support and process development for transformer oil, polyols, glycerin, and regulatory issues, and a lesser amount of administrative responsibility, partial building management of the Industrial Specialties Technology Center and the ISTC’s safety program.This position provides exposure to many corporate functions outside of R&D – e.g. operations, […]
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9:00 PM | Not that Noble
From Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie in 1856… Either this chap was publishing under a not-terribly-creative pseudonym, or someone at the editorial office got a bit confused…
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8:28 PM | Study reveals optimal particle size for anticancer nanomedicines
Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Understanding the interdependency of physiochemical properties of nanomedicines, in correlation to their biological responses and functions, is crucial for their further development of as cancer-fighters.
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5:01 PM | The images in Louis Simonin’s Mines and Miners: or, Underground...
The images in Louis Simonin’s Mines and Miners: or, Underground Life (1868) provide a fascinating glimpse into the lives of miners just after the middle of the 19th century. As Simonin puts it (the book was translated from the French and adapted by H. W. Bristow) In the following pages we purpose to describe the struggle of the miner in its reality, without exaggeration of any sort. We shall follow him to the field of his labours, observe him in his subterranean life, and describe his […]
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5:01 PM | The images in Louis Simonin’s Mines and Miners: or, Underground...
The images in Louis Simonin’s Mines and Miners: or, Underground Life (1868) provide a fascinating glimpse into the lives of miners just after the middle of the 19th century. As Simonin puts it (the book was translated from the French and adapted by H. W. Bristow) In the following pages we purpose to describe the struggle of the miner in its reality, without exaggeration of any sort. We shall follow him to the field of his labours, observe him in his subterranean life, and describe his […]
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4:14 PM | The world's thinnest generator - piezoelectricity observed in atomically thin MoS2
First experimental observation of piezoelectricity in an atomically thin material could lead to wearable devices.
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3:42 PM | European Commission opens the gate towards the implementation of Nanomedicine Translation Hub
A major step in implementing the ETPN Translation Hub has been reached, with three European projects entering the finalisation stage of their EU Grant Agreements.
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3:30 PM | Removing gloves and other protective equipment
One of the things highlighted in the news this week is […]Related Posts:Gloves in the laboratory: To wear or not to wear?On individual versus institutional responsibility for…Check your hydrogen fluoride cylindersNew lab safety video on personal protective equipmentStony Brook chemistry incorporates lab safety into Research…
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1:24 PM | Polyethylene Production coming to North Dakota
While my homestate of Minnesota remains a frack-free zone (due to Mother Nature's choice to stock us with iron, copper and other minerals rather than even a drop of petroleum), our neighboring state of North Dakota is pretty much ground zero for the effort. And we hear about it a lot since many people have taken the day's drive out there for the good paying jobs. Western North Dakota is not highly populated, so manpower is short. If you can pass a drug test and supply your own housing, you can […]
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11:05 AM | What is an Element? [part 2]
Last week we looked at what chemists class as an element and how that classification has changed throughout history, from very basic understanding of indivisible matter to relying on atomic number. Now, let’s have a closer look at some properties, starting with the all-important atomic number. Atomic number vs. isotopes As mentioned in our earlier [...]
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10:47 AM | Scientists map key moment in sssembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Crucial steps and surprising structures revealed in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
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10:21 AM | Nanoparticle-based photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo
Novel nanoparticles advance potential clinical application for photodynamic therapy.
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5:18 AM | Nanotechnology engineers develop disposable lung infection detector
Imagine a low-cost, disposable breath analysis device that a person with cystic fibrosis could use at home along with a smartphone to immediately detect a lung infection, much like the device police use to gauge a driver's blood alcohol level.
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3:08 AM | David Greenglass and Robert Oppenheimer: A lesson from history
David Greenglass and Robert Oppenheimer(Images: NYT and NDTV)The name of David Greenglass must have almost completely faded from memory for people of my generation. Greenglass himself probably wanted his name to fade from all of history, although history is seldom so kind. The fact remains that not only did he spy for the Soviet Union on the Manhattan Project but he also likely betrayed his sister and sent her to the electric chair.Greenglass who died quietly today at age 92 in a nursing home […]
Editor's Pick
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12:30 AM | Measuring Water Solubility of Platinum Group Metal Containing Substances
The water solubility of 22 platinum group metal (pgm) containing substances was evaluated to provide useful data for regulatory compliance and to aid assessment of their environmental impact. The flask method from OECD Guideline 105 (1) for the testing of chemicals (water solubility) was used to test each material. For substances that could not be isolated as pure solids, a simplified water solubility test was carried out. The results provide reliable data on solubility previously unavailable […]

October 14, 2014

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6:41 PM | Cheap catalyst gets expensive accessory
Together, iron and palladium help remove troubling oxygen for biofuel reaction.
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6:34 PM | Future computers could be built from magnetic 'tornadoes'
Magnetic materials form the basis of most hard disc drives as they are able to store data. Engineers have been investigating whether they could also be used to perform calculations, and so take on the role of a computer's central processing unit (CPU).
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6:27 PM | The Chemistry of Glow Sticks
Everyone’s familiar with glow sticks, but it’s likely that fewer are familiar with the chemistry behind their glow. You may have wondered what happens when you snap a glow stick to activate it; by doing this, you’re actually kicking off a chemical process that eventually leads to the production of the coloured light. But how does […]
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4:30 PM | Tour U Michigan's $46M nanomechanical engineering labs
With a 'breaker space', ultra-low vibration chambers and tissue culture rooms, a new world-class research complex at Michigan Engineering will let researchers study the forces at work at the smallest scales to advance nanotechnologies in energy, manufacturing, healthcare and biotechnology.
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4:19 PM | Who's the world's greatest living chemist?
Roald Hoffmann: My candidate for title of 'world's greatest living chemist'Since we have been making lists of Nobel Prize candidates for the last few weeks and since we already have a few lists of "greatest chemist in history", I thought I would ask for a different kind of selection: Who would be a candidate for the title of 'greatest living chemist'?Now I would be the first one to admit that any kind of 'greatest' list is always fuzzy and subjective, partly because the meaning of 'greatest' […]
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3:20 PM | Is the ACS ready for a Cannabis Chemistry division?
Via LinkedIn, a fascinating petition:This is a petition to form a professional division within the membership of the American Chemical Society. The title of division shall be Cannabis Chemists. One might think that this is too specific of a designation for a separate professional division. I would however argue that it is a rapidly expanding profession and that we face many issues specific to the industry. As the medical marijuana and recreational cannabis industry grows it promises to […]
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2:59 PM | Beyond LEDs: Brighter, new energy-saving flat panel lights based on carbon nanotubes
Planar light source using a phosphor screen with highly crystalline single-walled carbon nanotubes as field emitters demonstrates its potential for energy-efficient lighting device.
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2:57 PM | "Of course I own this facility!"
I've linked the Tremblay article below in the links post for the week, but I cannot resist this quote from the article:Censere’s Utley, though, is not surprised. In his 25 years as a financial investigator in China, he has come across all sorts of scams. One company that Utley and his team of forensic accountants was hired to investigate had 12 different sets of accounts that management used to show different groups. One indication of the large scale of fraud is that an open market […]
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2:54 PM | When will C&EN go digital-only? I shudder to think
From this week's C&EN, a funny letter: Yes, “moving to an exclusively digital format” would preserve natural resources, as Chris Erickson lucidly explained in his letter to the editor (C&EN, July 28, page 4). But I beg ACS to retain the print version of Chemical & Engineering News. It is, frankly, the principal benefit I derive from membership. Receiving C&EN in my otherwise crowded-with-catalogs mailbox is a weekly delight. I can read it anywhere. It gives […]
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