Posts

December 10, 2014

+
3:22 AM | Mind names YouTube star as first digital ambassador
Zoella launches #DontPanicButton campaign to raise awareness of anxiety
+
12:45 AM | Former UK health secretary joins FTI Consulting
Patricia Hewitt to advise on public affairs
+
12:15 AM | Creativity in health communications
Does the industry have the courage to push boundaries?

December 09, 2014

+
5:30 PM | Holiday and Honeymoon Hiatus
There is a lot of interesting science to write about this season, but unfortunately I have been kept mute by a number of obligations. It has been a busy semester teaching (and grading), and the holiday seasons means time with family and/or searching for gifts. More importantly, my pending nuptials have demanded time for preparation; finding the venue, getting the tux, and so forth. Although my loving fiancee handled a majority of the details, much of it was happily done together. Even happier […]
+
3:01 PM | Top 100 papers of 2014: courtesy of Altmetric
Congratulations to Marc Tischkowitz and colleagues for getting into Altmetrics Top 100 papers of the year. Their NEJM paper on increase risk of breast cancer in loss-of-function PALB2 carriers was number 87 and one of two papers from the University of Cambridge.The Altmetric Top 100 is heavily influenced by the media coverage of "newsworthy" publications and it is perhaps not surprising that the Number1 spot is taken by Facebook's rather controversial "emotional contagion" paper (covered by […]
+
1:00 PM | Surprising applications of economic thinking to scientific collaboration
. With contributions from David Brindley. Suppose you are a talented fisherman and an outstanding shoe-maker. You have abandoned your dreams of a career in the regenerative medicine industry because, in one day, you can catch 100 fish or make one complete pair of shoes. That’s a very satisfying outcome for a day’s work. Your...Read more
+
12:39 PM | ASH: Pradaxa antidote effective in key patient groups
Boehringer posts positive data on use of idarucizumab in elderly and people with kidney impairment
+
11:29 AM | Janssen sways NICE with Stelara discount
UK health watchdog set to recommend drug in psoriatic arthritis after agreeing patient access scheme
+
11:28 AM | Amgen's Xgeva cleared in US for rare bone cancer complication
Hypercalcaemia of malignancy affects around 2.7% of cancer patients
+
10:54 AM | Thousands more seek lung cancer tests thanks to campaign
Be Clear on Cancer campaign coincided with 3,000 extra GP referrals
+
10:38 AM | Pharmacy should move to a ‘wellness-based’ service
There’s a greater preventative role for pharmacists, says RPS
+
10:11 AM | AZ's constipation drug Moventig cleared in EU
Claims to be the first PAMORA to be approved in the EU

December 08, 2014

+
10:57 PM | Genetically engineered insulin does not cause cancer in diabetics
I have a lot of issues with the pseudo-medicine pushed by many many websites whose sole purpose is to push woo, or nonsense, to their readers. Then they have links to buy junk medicine from their website. Natural News, Mercola, and others have become multimillionaires with this business model. These “entrepreneurs” deceive their readers with […]Continue reading «Genetically engineered insulin does not cause cancer in diabetics»
+
8:40 PM | Médicos contra computadoras 2
Tarda pero llega. Sigo con la discusión del artículo: Do We Need Doctors or Algorithms? de Vinod Khosla, ¡que había empezado en febrero de 2012! En aquel entonces había prometido una segunda parte. El tema es vastísimo y claramente no me iba a dar para abordarlo de una,  pero fue quedando para atrás y recién ahora lo encaro de nuevo.Pueden leer la primera parte aquí (con algunas correcciones actuales, pero esencialmente […]
+
7:04 PM | Gel Extraction Comb Trick
H/T LabTricks Tweet This Post
+
3:47 PM | Oxford plots from the gibbon genome paper
A while back I talked about the software in the gibbon genome paper. I went through to try to pull out as much of the software as I could as sort of a catalog of a representative genome project. Of course, there was a lot in there. Some of it, though, consisted of unpublished code. […]
+
2:34 PM | Is Artificial Intelligence a Threat to Mankind?
Technology: We all use it, and some of us couldn’t go an entire day without it. In many ways, digital technology has improved our lives by increasing productivity and communication. Computer technology is everywhere: our homes, offices, phones and even cars. Technology has integrating into our lives so completely that most of us no longer […]
+
2:14 PM | Inside a cancer stem cell researcher’s toolbox: CSC markers & flow cytometry
> In my previous toolbox articles (sphere formation and xenotransplantation), I’ve talked about assays that are pretty useful in determining the existence of cancer stem cell (CSC) populations based on function. What these assays cannot do is provide us with a way to identify the specific cells. Well, guess what? There’s a tool for that...Read more
+
1:00 PM | Why the iBrick standard?
By Jin Wang, Ph.D. CAS Key Laboratory of Synthetic Biology Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 20032, China cmg.wangjin@gmail.com The...
+
1:00 PM | Why the iBrick standard?
By Jin Wang, Ph.D. CAS Key Laboratory of Synthetic Biology Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 20032, China cmg.wangjin@gmail.com The...
+
12:10 PM | Genomes, exomes or amplicones: what's best for the clinic?
Clinical sequencing is looming and recently I've heard more, and better, arguments for using whole genomes. These have mainly focused on the quality of PCR-free genomes, which have uniform coverage and few regions of missing or very low coverage. Compared to the PCR and hybridisation-capture artefact's in exomes, or the focus on a biased set of genes a genome can sound very convincing (especially if you ignore the analysis/storage issues). Until recently the cost has still been too high, but […]
+
10:16 AM | Opening up the interactome
The completion of the human genome sequence just over a decade ago was a triumph for biomedical research. We have since expanded our knowledge through projects such as the Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE), which aimed to identify all the functional elements within the genome. The ultimate goal is knowledge of how the genes workRead More
+
8:40 AM | CRISPR + stem cells = gene therapy
CRISPR, the gene editing tool borrowed from bacteria, has been used to prevent muscular dystrophy in mouse embryos and treat liver disease in adult mice. Now it has also been used to treat stem cells from human muscular dystrophy patients. And this might be the key to making CRISPR gene therapy a viable treatment for […]

December 07, 2014

+
5:00 AM | Using the Genetic Code for Passwords
Many years ago, a friend was helping me set up a desktop computer. When the time came to choose a password, he said it should be: • Alphanumeric • More than 7 numbers or letters • Obvious to me, but not to anyone else The genetic code popped into my mind, and has remained an endless source of diverse passwords, valuable because they may seem nonsensical to non-biologists.

December 06, 2014

+
11:00 PM | Debunking the vaccine denier myths of the Argument by Package Insert
Revised 6 December 2014 to clarify a few points, improve readability and include a new logical fallacy. One of the cherished strategies of vaccine deniers is to quote the package insert (called a Patient Information Leaflet in EU countries and Instructions for Use in the case of medical devices) to “prove” that vaccines are dangerous. Vaccine […]Continue reading «Debunking the vaccine denier myths of the Argument by Package Insert»
+
11:18 AM | Cattle Quarantined in Montana After Brucellosis Case Confirmed
On Friday, Montana state officials announced that a few thousand head of cattle had been quarantined, as a cow near the border of Yellowstone National Park has tested positive for brucellosis. Brucellosis was first introduced into North America by infected livestock brought in by European settlers. It’s a zoonotic bacterial infection with forms that affect many different species of mammals, most notably humans, bison, elk, cattle, horses, pigs, sheep and goats. In cattle, signs of […]
+
3:28 AM | How has Science Blogging Changed Over the Years?
How has science blogging changed over the years? I asked one science blogger this question recently in one of #MySciBlog research interviews. I think the response is very perceptive. All Sorts of Weird Stuff  "the big thing that’s changed is sort of the, at least from my perspective the big thing that’s changed is kind the nature of the field. When I started blogging in 2001/2002 uh, there was this weird, like absolutely anybody would – there were blogs about... Read more
+
2:00 AM | MSG-myth versus science
Updated 5 December 2014 Food additives are one of the most passionate issues amongst people who eat (which would be everyone). Aspartame. High fructose corn syrup. GMO‘s. Salt. Sugar. Trans fats. Polysorbate 80. Some of the angst caused by these additives is that they have scary chemical names. Obviously the “low fructose corn syrup” has got to be […]Continue reading «MSG-myth versus science»

December 05, 2014

+
2:14 PM | Christensenellaceae—A Natural Way to Stay Thin?
A study published in the Nov 6 issue of Cell outlined results suggesting that an obscure family of bacteria colonizing the human gut may be inherited and may also have a direct influence on body weight. The paper is the first to identify such an association and to link a particular microbial colonist with lower […]
+
1:47 PM | Friday SNPpets
Welcome to our Friday feature link collection: SNPpets. During the week we come across a lot of links and reads that we think are interesting, but don’t make it to a blog post. Here they are for your enjoyment… RT @mriverohuguet: Launch #WormBase #Parasite the largest collection of helminth genomic data .@EMBLEBI @Wellcometrust .@BBSRC.  http://t.co/Uq28xRUJJH […]
123456789
304 Results