Posts

March 28, 2015

+
9:41 PM | What's the Word for "Species Genocide"?
MT @96Elephants: #Botswana meeting news: Must scale up war on #elephant poaching @sslieberman http://t.co/IbkL6Klp4i pic.twitter.com/MOE5m4VDZF— Nat Moss (@natmoss) March 28, 2015
+
8:58 PM | My Evil Red Pen & Why I don’t Like the Concept of Extra Credit
From time to time, I like posting pictures like this in my FB and Twitter: When I post it, I usually say things like “Grading, mwahahahahahaaaaa!” and I tell tales of fire and brimstone, lightning and maniac laughter, etc… But, all of it is a joke. I do not enjoy taking points away from my …
+
7:30 PM | Brain Bits, 3/28/15
Welcome to Brain Bits, where I highlight important or interesting recent news in the world of neuroscience. In store for today: wireless brain stimulation, implanting false memories during sleep, and a new technology for mutating an entire species (seriously!).   A new Science paper demonstrates how a recently developed DNA engineering technique called CRISPR can be used to generate self-propagating mutations. Mutated genes usually spread slowly throughout a […]
+
5:50 PM | I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (28 March 2015)
Sign up for The Ed’s Up—a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from …
+
4:23 PM | Ungulate Humor
*at the Split-Hooved Pub* Couple of regular yaks look up over their drinks and ask the bartender, "Hey, who's the gnu girl?"— AmishPornStar (@AmishPornStar1) March 28, 2015
+
3:06 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 27/03/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
3:00 PM | Misbeliefs, evolution and games: a positive case
A recurrent theme here in TheEGG is the limits and reliability of knowledge. These get explored from many directions: on epistemological grounds, from the philosophy of science angle, but also formally, through game theory and simulations. In this post, I will explore the topic of misbeliefs as adaptations. Misbeliefs will be intended as ideas about […]

Kaznatcheev, A., Montrey, M. & Shultz, T.R. (2014). Evolving useful delusions: Subjectively rational selfishness leads to objectively irrational cooperation., Proceedings of the 36th annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.0041v1

Citation
+
2:45 PM | Hahahahahahaha
Instead of opening the field for actors of any race to compete for any role in a color-blind manner, there has been a significant number of parts designated as ethnic this year, making them off-limits for Caucasian actors,” complains Andreeva. Link.
+
2:31 PM | Placing Extinct Species in a Molecular Phylogeny Using Quantitative Characters: A Case Study Using Anolis roosevelti
Liam Revell writes: My co-authors (Luke Mahler, Graham Reynolds, & Graham Slater) and I recently presented a ‘new’ method for placing recently extinct taxa into a backbone molecular phylogeny on the basis of quantitative trait data. I say ‘new’ with quotes, because our methods derives closely, with full credit given where due, from a Maximum […]
+
2:00 PM | Science Caturday: Funding Lags for Cosmocats
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko lifted off Friday from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to spend almost a year on the International Space Station.  Kelly’s long sojourn in space will beat the U.S. record for longest-duration spaceflight … Continue reading →
+
1:00 PM | Genetic determinants of stomatal conductance
Leaf gas exchange is influenced by stomatal size, density, distribution between the leaf adaxial and abaxial sides, as well as by pore dimensions.
+
1:00 PM | Giant Pandas Coming into Focus: Photos
Giant pandas continue to fascinate us, as we try to fill gaps in our knowledge about them.
+
10:10 AM | The Rhipidothyrididae: Brachiopods of the Devonian
Specimen of Rhenorensselaeria, copyright Miguasha National Park.In the modern world, the brachiopods are an unfamiliar group to most people. To most, they would probably not be readily distinguished from the much more abundant bivalves that they superficially resemble (a resemblance that is literally only skin deep: brachiopods and bivalves are in no way close relatives, and their internal anatomy is fundamentally different). However, this was not always the case. If one was to travel back to […]
+
9:15 AM | E’ l’ora della Terra: spegnete tutte le luci
Oggi, a partire dalle 20:30 e per sessanta minuti, si celebra l’Ora della Terra. Un invito a spegnere le luci e riflettere sui cambiamenti climatici in atto
+
9:00 AM | News digest – Angelina Jolie, pesticides, liver cancer, and more
We've digested all the week's key cancer-related headlines. You can read them here.
+
8:21 AM | UV Safe Umbrellas
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is an electromagnetic wave. It comes from the sun and travels to the surface of the Earth. While UVR is vital to human (it provides us with the essential vitamin, vitamin D), but it can also cause harm especially to the eye and skin such as burn, hyperpigmentation, photoaging skin, keratoconjunctivitis, stimulation of photodermatoses and cutaneous cancer.This is why we need different methods of protection from the harmful and potentially damaging sun rays. The types […]
+
7:00 AM | Photo 426 : Un grand duc très bruyant
No summary available for this post.
+
7:00 AM | The Man Behind Your Favorite (Or Least Favorite) Fast Foods
Are you a fan of stuffed crust pizza? Do you start off each day with a sausage, egg, and cheese McGriddle? Well, then you need to thank Tom Ryan, the man who invented some of the planet's most popular (and hated) fast foods. The post The Man Behind Your Favorite (Or Least Favorite) Fast Foods appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
+
4:00 AM | Pond Dwellers (Friday Five)
I’ve been spending a lot of time photographing aquatic insects recently.  I’ve been very busy at work, so I find it relaxing to sit and watch my little tank full of insects in the evenings, observing their behaviors and photographing them.  Next week I’ll share another developmental series like the snail series I posted last week, […]
+
1:52 AM | http://walkaboutem.com/2015/03/28/176083508/
At least it’s not more dandelions, right? WalkaboutEm will now update three times a week. Trust me, if you want sketches of anything other than my stapler (yup, that drawing is coming…) then I need more time per post to develop content. Doing a little illustration for you guys every day has been a lot […]

March 27, 2015

+
11:13 PM | Uncommon Sighting
America's stunning ring-tailed cats caught on camera http://t.co/zmN9rdl5tz file under: critters you almost never see, even when common— Jason G. Goldman (@jgold85) March 27, 2015 Although they are often sighted (during the day, but in the dark) at the NC Zoo.
+
10:22 PM | What’s gnawing on Jane Austen’s hair?
The years hadn’t been kind to the lonely lock of Jane Austen’s hair on display in a Hampshire museum. Light had bleached it to a straw color; only the shadowed underside remained its original brown. A few tiny flakes of … Continue reading →

Swift JA (1972). Scanning electron microscope study of Jane Austen's hair., Nature, 238 (5360) 161-2. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4558459

Citation
+
9:58 PM | Fixing 'leaky' blood vessels to combat severe respiratory ailments and, perhaps, Ebola
When you get an infection, your immune system responds with an influx of inflammatory cells that target the underlying bacteria or viruses. These immune cells migrate from your blood into the infected tissue in order to release a cocktail of pro-inflammatory proteins and help eliminate the infectious threat. During this inflammatory response, the blood vessel barrier becomes “leaky.” This allows for an even more rapid influx of additional immune cells. Once the infection resolves, […]
+
8:21 PM | A Place in Space and Star Cycles
For STEM Friday we have a new e-book, A Place In Space, by Astronomer Sarah Willis. In a clever linkage of ideas, a young girl and her cat take an imaginary trip into space (via telescope) to explore the Cat’s … Continue reading →
+
8:00 PM | New Baby Anteater Clings to Mom at Denver Zoo
Denver Zoo has announced the birth of a southern tamandua, a species of anteater and the zoo's second such birth.
+
7:50 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
The math of Ferguson: percentages don’t show how bad it really is “What’s our Nature paper?” Are walking and cycling as green as we imagine? The other issue is that cars look relatively good because the comparison is on a … Continue reading →
+
6:36 PM | ‘It’s really difficult to be a polymath’ – Sir Paul Nurse on multidisciplinary research
We talked to Sir Paul Nurse about his role spearheading one of the UK’s most exciting ventures into modern multidisciplinary research.
+
5:46 PM | News Flash: Panfish Poles Back on Sale!
Cabela’s telescopic panfish poles (in both 10′ and 12′ versions) are currently on sale, reduced from $27.99 to $17.49 per pole. These are currently regarded as the best product in the anole noosing game (1,2,3). Telescopic panfish poles on sale here. Get them while you can!
+
5:00 PM | How & Why to Shuffle Cards Properly
HT: David Pescovitz at BoingBoingFiled under: Curiosities of Nature Tagged: cards, Numberphile, Persi Diaconis
+
5:00 PM | What's Up with Seed Catalogs in BHL?
Cole's Garden Annual. 1892. From the BHL Seed and Nursery Catalog Collection.We've spent a fun-filled week exploring the history, art, and science of gardening with our Garden Stories event. Seed and nursery catalogs and lists played a starring role in our campaign, allowing us to explore the world of gardening through the instruments that informed, documented, shaped, and transformed the industry.As our journey this week has demonstrated, seed and nursery catalogs and lists allow us to trace […]
123456789
1,562 Results