Posts

September 29, 2014

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8:55 PM | The Shellshock Bug In About Four Minutes Remember Heartbleed?...
The Shellshock Bug In About Four Minutes Remember Heartbleed? Well, this is probably worse. Here’s a (somewhat simplified) explanation of what Shellshock actually is. Don’t worry: I haven’t included instructions on how to actually exploit it. The moral of the story is: keep your security patches up to date! Uploaded by: Tom Scott.
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8:23 PM | Fortune magazine cover designed by Arthur Lidov, depicting...
Fortune magazine cover designed by Arthur Lidov, depicting Maxwell’s thermodynamic surface of an “imaginary substance” similar to (though not quite) water based on J. W. Gibbs's work, alongside Gibbs's formula for the phase rule, bottom left To describe a closed, homogeneous system — that is one of constant composition, such as an ideal gas — we need two parameters of state (e.g. T and p). For a heterogeneous system in equilibrium, […]
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8:10 PM | Postdoc: Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma
Postdoctoral Positions Available at the University of Oklahoma Multiple postdoctoral positions are available at the Institute for Environmental Genomics (IEG) and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, the University of Oklahoma (OU) located in Norman, Oklahoma. The city of Norman is a university town with approximately 100,000 people and easy access to Oklahoma City, OK and Dallas, TX, […]
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8:05 PM | Amphibiville Seeks New Mayor
Must be 7-12 years old and able to periodically commute to Detroit Zoo.Amphibiville is a "two-acre wetland village and home to the National Amphibian Conservation Center."The mayor's term is two years.
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8:05 PM | Cloudy climate change: How clouds affect Earth’s...
Cloudy climate change: How clouds affect Earth’s temperature As the Earth’s surface temperature gradually rises, it has become vital for us to predict the rate of this increase with as much precision as possible. In order to do that, scientists need to understand more about aerosols and clouds. Jasper Kirkby details an experiment at CERN that aims to do just that. View full lesson: […]
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8:00 PM | Pinker explains why academics can’t write
Ahead of tomorrow’s release of Steven Pinker’s new book on writing, The Chronicle features a teaser essay – “Why Academics’ Writing Stinks”: An insight from literary analysis and an insight from cognitive science go a long way toward explaining why … Continue reading →
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7:52 PM | Proud
Proud to work where one gets an e-mail like this (with the Subject line: "Hit the Brakes for Snakes (and everything else)"; where we are warned to respect the lives of snakes instead of warned to fear them:"A small Timber Rattlesnake was run over and killed on the service road behind the Prairie Exhibit over the weekend.  This is a species of “Special Concern” in North Carolina.  Please be careful when traveling this stretch of road, especially this time of year, as […]
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7:16 PM | Thirst of the Vampire - Monster Science №8 How does a creature...
Thirst of the Vampire - Monster Science №8 How does a creature evolve to dine on an exclusive diet of blood? Join Dr. Anton Jessup as he dissects the unnatural humanoid vampire and the amazing evolution of the real-life vampire bat. Original Monster of the Week Post: http://www.stufftoblowyourmind.com/blog/monster-of-the-week-humanoid-vampire/ Uploaded by: How Stuff Works.
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7:15 PM | Limb Regeneration Began 300 Million Years Ago
Fossilized, primitive amphibians with odd-looking appendages suggest the ability of some vertebrates to regenerate or regrow amputated limbs first evolved at least 300 million years ago.
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7:15 PM | New Poison Dart Frog Species Found in Panama
Creature's distinctive color and call make is stand out.
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7:04 PM | Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees
Survival tip: don’t hang around machines that have giant spinning blades. It’s a lesson bats have been slow to learn, judging by the large numbers of their corpses found beneath wind turbines. New video footage suggests some bats are attracted to wind farms because they can’t tell turbines apart from trees. If it’s true, this […]The post Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees appeared first on Inkfish.

Paul. M. Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen, Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher, Robert H. Diehl, Manuela M. Huso, David T. S. Hayman, Paul D. Fricker, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Douglas H. Johnson & Kevin Heist (2014). Behavior of bats at wind turbines, PNAS, Other:

Citation
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6:27 PM | Alaska mountain glaciers retreating due to climate...
Alaska mountain glaciers retreating due to climate change Tighten your seat belt! This runway is made of ice. Welcome to Ruth Glacier, deep inside Alaska’s Denali National Park and Preserve. Some of the visitors are here for recreational activities, such as backcountry skiing, but this is no vacation for University of Maine paleoclimatologist Karl Kreutz and his team. For them, time on the ice is all part of the job. With support from the National Science Foundation, the scientists are […]
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6:22 PM | New insights into how the heart forms may help identify heart defects
Cdc42 controls embryonic heart formation
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6:02 PM | Microbial sequencing at Nature Methods
Over the years, Nature Methods has published many methods to generate and analyze complex sequence data for microbial studies. We cover highlights from our papers below.  Read more
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6:02 PM | Science and Religion Blah Blah Blah
A perennial question, a constant product of the click-bait-and-outrage factory known as internet, that has been, and perhaps forever will be posed, answered, yelled about, and generally used to beat the life and enthusiasm out of so many reasonably evolutionary biologists is “CAN RELIGION AND SCIENCE (PARTICULARLY EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY FOR SOME REASON) COEXIST??!?!!?!!?” The answer […]
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5:56 PM | Super-resolution microscopy at Nature Methods
On this 10th anniversary of the first issue of Nature Methods it is appropriate to look back at the relationship between the journal and super-resolution microscopy, one of the technologies we have chosen as one of the top ten methods developments in the ten years since Nature Methods published it first issue.  Read more
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5:54 PM | Optogenetics in neuroscience at Nature Methods
The optogenetic manipulation of cellular properties has not only revolutionized neuroscience, but this technology can also be applied to the manipulation of signaling pathways, transcription or other processes in non-neuronal cells. Here, we highlight some of the papers we have published on the neuroscience side of optogenetics.  Read more
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5:43 PM | Light sheet imaging in Nature Methods
It was only a few months before Nature Methods was launched in October 2004 that Jan Huisken and Ernst Stelzer had published a paper in Science in which they used light sheet microscopy – what they called selective plane illumination microscopy or SPIM – to image fluorescence within transgenic embryos. Simplistically put, this century-old technique achieves optical sectioning by illuminating a sample through its width with a thin sheet of light. In the last decade, Nature Methods […]
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5:38 PM | While You Were Sleeping: Better Treatment For...
While You Were Sleeping: Better Treatment For Parkinson’s New imaging technology lets patients decide if they want to sleep through brain surgery. More information on this story at http://www.insidescience.org/content/while-you-were-sleeping-better-treatment-parkinsons/2081 Uploaded by: Inside Science.
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5:37 PM | Water, water everything
This time of year is tricky for gardening especially when mild warm weather predominates, but things aren't growing so much. Gardens just don't look like it's the end of September out there, and it's easy to get lulled into complacency. So here's the thing: keep those newly planted trees and shrubs, especially conifers, well watered. Remember winter survival is more about desiccation than it is about cold. Deciduous plants drop all those water-wasting leaves, but most conifers […]
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5:17 PM | Postdoc: Yeast Evolutionary Genomics
The Hittinger Lab, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison is seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with an exceptional background in bioinformatics, functional genomics, or evolutionary genomics. Experience analyzing Illumina sequence data, computer programming proficiency, and training in ecological or evolutionary genetics are highly desirable. The lab recently received generous funding for yeast evolutionary genomics research from the National Science […]
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4:49 PM | Control Your Virtual World — Mind Blow №87 Put on your...
Control Your Virtual World — Mind Blow №87 Put on your jetpack and your sensory isolation headgear - it’s time for a NEW MIND BLOW! Uploaded by: Vsauce2. Support, get T-Shirts.
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4:34 PM | Weird Biology Fact of the Day: Mirror-image Amino Acids
In her fascinating and wide-ranging talk on multi-dimensional spaces and human consciousness, Tauba Auerbach briefly mentioned the fact that after an organism dies its molecules will gradually change... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:24 PM | #casLABlanca
We took some time off from corrupting classic(ish) films with science, but we came back strong this past Friday with #casLABlanca – a noble effort to science-fy the 1942 classic Casablanca. Despite the risk this posed, I was pleased with the results … Continue reading →
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4:15 PM | Rare White Orca Seen Off Coast of Russia
Only the second known sighting of pale killer whale in the wild.
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4:14 PM | Sclerotia
Sclerotia are hard, compact masses of fungal mycelium that usually form in soil or plant tissue. They are thought to serve as resting structures that can survive and remain quiescent in adverse environmental conditions until circumstances become favorable for fungal growth. Some sclerotia have been used as food and medicine for a long time in human history.The fungus Cenococcum geophilum forms sclerotia in forest soils. It is one of the most common ectomycorrhizal fungi encountered in forest […]
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4:05 PM | Mass spectrometry-based proteomics at Nature Methods
A look back at highlights in proteomics technology developments published in Nature Methods.  Read more
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4:00 PM | Analyzing high throughput sequencing data
Nature Methods has published popular analysis tools to make sense of the ever-increasing amount of high throughput (HTP) sequencing data. Some tools in this field have a short half life, due to pressure to always improve and innovate, others have staying power. Let’s look back over some of the highlights in our pages.  Read more
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3:54 PM | Breaking Bio Episode 67 – Autotrophs, roll out! with Dr. Hope Jahren
  Tom talks to Dr. Hope Jahren from the University of Hawaii Manoa about her work on plants and how they deal with changing climates, both in recent years and long in the past. Learn more about Hope’s research & read her excellent writing at: Lab webpage Personal blog – Hope Jahren Sure Can Write (she’s(...)
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3:35 PM | Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbes
Researchers at the University of Chicago have shown that after a long stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) only a handful of pathogenic microbe species remain behind in patients' intestines.
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