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Posts

April 23, 2014

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3:31 PM | Public Service Announcement: Invest in Index Funds
PSA: Invest in index funds We live in a sort of reverse Victorian age: it’s easier to talk of sexual matters than of money [1]. I have recently been surprised at how ignorant even highly educated Europeans are about their financial … Continue reading →
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3:30 PM | Curiosity Hates You! The allure of the unknown, the lust for...
Curiosity Hates You! The allure of the unknown, the lust for knew experiences. Curiosity fuels our biggest adventures and Curiosity Hates You! via Nature Hates You.
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3:24 PM | Slipper animacule
Image taken from micro*scopeParamecia were among the first ciliates to be seen through early microscopes in the late 17th century. The first description occurs in a letter by his contemporary Christiaan Huygens in 1678. Huygens was a prominent Dutch mathematician and scientist. Interestingly is not known for this particular discovery but more for his telescopic studies of the rings of Saturn and the discovery of its moon Titan which was honored by   the European Space Agency (ESA) by […]
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3:13 PM | Sponsor a fish and save Canada’s experimental lakes
Fans of environmental science can now play a direct role in helping Canada’s unique Experimental Lakes Area continue to do the research it has done for decades.  Read more
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3:13 PM | Sponsor a fish and save Canada’s experimental lakes
Fans of environmental science can now play a direct role in helping Canada’s unique Experimental Lakes Area continue to do the research it has done for decades.  Read more
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3:13 PM | Sponsor a fish and save Canada’s experimental lakes
Fans of environmental science can now play a direct role in helping Canada’s unique Experimental Lakes Area continue to do the research it has done for decades.  Read more
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3:09 PM | White Sox, Comer Children’s Hospital Team Up for Second Year to Fight Obesity
The Chicago White Sox and the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital kicked off the second year of a partnership to fight childhood obesity.
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3:00 PM | Vaccinated person transmits measles to other vaccinated people– MMR doesnt work?
Spoiler to apologize for click-bait title: Yes, the MMR vaccine works just fine. But there is a difference between ‘just fine’ and ‘perfectly’. A few things I would want in a ‘perfect’ vaccine– Only one dose is needed, zero side-effects, 100% protective antibody or CTL mediated immunity for life, inability of the target pathogen to…
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3:00 PM | Sleep: Men vs. Women Men tend to need less sleep than women, but...
Sleep: Men vs. Women Men tend to need less sleep than women, but insomnia affects more women. What gives? Cristen explores the science how biological sex interacts with sleep. via Stuff Mom Never Told You.
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3:00 PM | London’s biotech hub with Kit Malthouse
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re all about entrepreneurship: what it takes to be one, how to become one and more. But if you’re based in London, it’s not so easy. Although it’s got the brains and research centres to make it a hub, setting up shop in London is the tricky part. In this podcast, I speak to Kit Malthouse, the Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise, and find out how London is preparing to become the next biotech hub.  […]
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3:00 PM | London’s biotech hub with Kit Malthouse
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re all about entrepreneurship: what it takes to be one, how to become one and more. But if you’re based in London, it’s not so easy. Although it’s got the brains and research centres to make it a hub, setting up shop in London is the tricky part. In this podcast, I speak to Kit Malthouse, the Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise, and find out how London is preparing to become the next biotech hub.  […]
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3:00 PM | London’s biotech hub with Kit Malthouse
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re all about entrepreneurship: what it takes to be one, how to become one and more. But if you’re based in London, it’s not so easy. Although it’s got the brains and research centres to make it a hub, setting up shop in London is the tricky part. In this podcast, I speak to Kit Malthouse, the Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise, and find out how London is preparing to become the next biotech hub.  […]
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2:45 PM | Egypt’s scientists want to redirect sunlight to narrow streets
A group of Egyptian scientists at Ain Shams University have come up with the idea for translucent panels that can divert natural sunlight into densely-crowded alleyways, and can get easily fitted there, on a lower budget.  Read more
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2:45 PM | Egypt’s scientists want to redirect sunlight to narrow streets
A group of Egyptian scientists at Ain Shams University have come up with the idea for translucent panels that can divert natural sunlight into densely-crowded alleyways, and can get easily fitted there, on a lower budget.  Read more
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2:45 PM | Egypt’s scientists want to redirect sunlight to narrow streets
A group of Egyptian scientists at Ain Shams University have come up with the idea for translucent panels that can divert natural sunlight into densely-crowded alleyways, and can get easily fitted there, on a lower budget.  Read more
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2:30 PM | Courmayeur: la frana è imprevedibile
La frana del Monte La Saxe continua a fare paura. Solo nella scorsa settimana infatti, il picco che sovrasta Courmayeur ha tremato ben due volte: prima giovedì, con il distacco del cosiddetto “naso” della frana, che ha fatto precipitare a valle 5.000 metri cubi di rocce, e poi domenica, quando una frana da 2.000 metri cubi ha fatto scattare le procedure di emergenza, provocando per 20 minuti il blocco del traffico nel Traforo Internazionale del Monte Bianco. Dallo scorso 8 […]
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2:00 PM | Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab
Psychologists and neurologists have been interested in the problem of free will since the beginning of their specialities, though the first clearly devised and relevant […] Read more The post Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Je ne regrette rien (1): On the neuropsychology of free will Mapping areas involved in voluntary forgetting is not simple... it is double! Reinforcement learning in the brain

Filevich E., Kühn S., Haggard P. & Pourtois G. (2013). There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit, PLoS ONE, 8 (2) e53053. DOI:

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2:00 PM | US History Review - Schechter Poultry vs US (1935) Test the...
US History Review - Schechter Poultry vs US (1935) Test the limits of the New Deal and the power of the Federal Government with this historic Supreme Court Case. via Keith Hughes.
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2:00 PM | Away from home: Making graphene flakes in a kitchen blender
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
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2:00 PM | Away from home: Making graphene flakes in a kitchen blender
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
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2:00 PM | Away from home: Making graphene flakes in a kitchen blender
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
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2:00 PM | The Art of Science: Blogger’s Block
Dear Readers of the Finch & Pea, I want to thank you for tuning in on Wednesdays for a little dose of art and science. I really appreciate it. But I also want to ask you, have you blogged? Have … Continue reading →
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1:58 PM | Epigenetics of a Certain Age
It’s my birthday.  I’m of a certain age.  My methylome is diminishing…and I’m taking it personally.  What can epigenetics tell me about halting this process?! There is some context to ageing.  As we age, our global methylation levels decrease.  Yet, gene promoter methylation increases, especially for genes involved in regulation of developmental patterns.  Ageing is like a slow version of carcingogenesis.  The biomarker patterns differ […]
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1:58 PM | Epigenetics of a Certain Age
It’s my birthday.  I’m of a certain age.  My methylome is diminishing…and I’m taking it personally.  What can epigenetics tell me about halting this process?! There is some context to ageing.  As we age, our global methylation levels decrease.  Yet, gene promoter methylation increases, especially for genes involved in regulation of developmental patterns.  Ageing is like a slow version of carcingogenesis.  The biomarker patterns differ […]
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1:50 PM | The Molecular Ecologist: Scanning the genome for local adaptation
This week at The Molecular Ecologist, I've just posted a new discussion of the latest publication to come out of my postdoctoral research with the Medicago HapMap Project. It's an attempt to find genome regions that might be important for adaptation to climate, by scanning through a whole lot of genetic data from plants collected in different climates.This is what’s known as a “reverse ecology” approach—it skips over the process of identifying specific traits that are […]
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1:36 PM | Video Tip of the Week: Atlas of Cancer Signaling Networks
Last week I highlighted a software tool that lets you customize maps of molecular interactions, and navigate around at various resolutions to explore. It’s called NaviCell, and it seems to offer a lot of opportunity for folks to develop helpful maps related to their research. This week I’m going to note that this same team […]

Kuperstein I., Cohen D.P., Pook S., Viara E., Calzone L., Barillot E. & Zinovyev A. (2013). NaviCell: a web-based environment for navigation, curation and maintenance of large molecular interaction maps, BMC Systems Biology, 7 (1) 100. DOI:

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1:36 PM | A working group from universities across Europe is to look at...
A working group from universities across Europe is to look at DNA topology in a new light. Dr Dorothy Buck from Imperial College is to lead them in exploring how knots and links are removed so that newly replicated chromosomes can be faithfully segregated to daughter cells. Dr. Buck’s main research interests are mathematical biology and three-manifold topology. In particular she harnesses topological techniques to illuminate structural and mechanical features of […]
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1:30 PM | X-ray movie shows how fly beats its wings Peering inside a...
X-ray movie shows how fly beats its wings Peering inside a living blowfly during flight reveals the intricate muscle movement involved. Full story: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25288#.U1WxY1cU9xM via New Scientist Video.
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1:30 PM | The A.P. on "Endangered Song"
The Associated Press (& The Washington Post) article on the "endangered song" released by Portugal. The Man and the National Zoo.
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1:17 PM | Sea turtles, soccer balls, and circus bears: welcome to Cole Alpaugh's beautiful, whimsical world.
His writing has been compared to John Irving's beautiful prose, and his debut novel, The Bear in a Muddy Tutu, to Sara Gruen's bestseller Water for Elephants: Cole Alpaugh is a novelist, an award-winning journalist, and a photographer. His stories are unique, his characters bitter-sweet, and his narrative a mix of melancholy and humor, which is, ultimately, the oxymoron of human existence. There's a special sensitivity that goes in Cole's writing, and if you'll read on in the interview, […]
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