Posts

August 21, 2014

+
7:58 PM | From blog to journal
I recently wrote a slightly whinging blog post about the time I spent updating all my online profiles after I had my most recent paper published. To my surprise, that experience got mentioned in a recent news article in Nature. It’s a sidebar that only appears in the online version of the story, not the print version, alas.It’s a good reminder that when you write in public, you never know where your influence stops.Related postsUpdating, updating, and updating some moreExternal […]
+
7:51 PM | A Home for Ontogeny and Phylogeny
Construction of the Phyletisches Museum in Jena, Germany began on Goethe’s birthday on August 28, 1907. The Art Nouveau-styled museum was devised by the great evolutionary biologist, embryologist and artist/howthefuckdoyousummarizehowcoolhewas Ernst Haeckel, who by that time had earned fame in many areas of research (and art), including coining the terms ontogeny and phylogeny which feature prominently in the […]
+
7:36 PM | These lizards may be able to learn from each other
Wild ThingsAnimals by Sarah Zielinski 8:16am, August 22, 2014 An experiment found evidence of social learning among eastern water skinks, a long-lived species from Australia.Toby Hudson/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)PRINCETON, N.J. — Learning can be a quick shortcut for figuring out how to do something on your own. The ability to learn from watching another individual — called […]
+
6:53 PM | An infantile hypothesis for Mandrillus sphinx coloration
Tomorrow, Friday August 22, is the deadline for submitting your bad ad hoc (bah) hypotheses for consideration to be presented at BahFest 2014. I've been chewing a bit on an idea about mandrill coloration and it's just not at all ready, so I'm not going to submit it despite my desperate desire to participate. And I'll just hope that by next year's submission deadline I'll have a much better idea, one that I've had time to actually and properly research and to build strong with data, one […]
+
6:05 PM | Dandruff-Causing Skin Fungi Discovered Unexpectedly in Deep Sea Vents, Antarctica
Until relatively recently, the fungus Malassezia was thought to have one favorite home: us. As the dominant fungus on human skin and sometimes-cause of dandruff, the yeast Malassezia was thought to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
6:05 PM | Mussels and Clams Can Clean Up Polluted Water
As they filter water, the bivalves' tissues absorb some of the chemicals and pathogens that are present.
+
6:00 PM | Birds Lost Their Sweet Tooth, Hummingbirds Got Theirs Back
In 2004, the chicken became the first bird to have its genome fully sequenced. Its DNA revealed something …
+
5:46 PM | USS Ronald Reagan Irridiated
Harvey Wasserman reported on the similarities between the Lucky Dragon and the USS Ronald Reagan recently in a blog.  The Lucky Dragon was a Japanese fishing boat that was down wind from a nuclear bomb test.  For a long time the US denied any relationship with The LuckyDragon and they are denying any relationship with USS […]
+
5:35 PM | Tepco fails to create ice wall to stem radioactive water flow
Originally posted on Japan Safety : Nuclear Energy Updates:” Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Tuesday it had failed in an attempt to create an ice wall in an underground tunnel to block the flow of highly radioactive water from a damaged reactor at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power station. Since last month, TEPCO has…
+
5:00 PM | Mythology is Gross
Samuel Arbesman has a fun, if creepy, post over at Wired on calculating how inbred the Greek gods were. Previously, here at The Finch & Pea, we’ve taken on the inevitable inbreeding that must have occurred in Adam and Eve’s family, … Continue reading →
+
4:53 PM | From the vault: I•Con 2 logo
I•Con was a fan run science fiction convention in Victoria, British Columbia. There are several SF conventions with that name, but in this case, “I” was supposed to stand for “Island”, as in Vancouver Island.There were two iterations of I•Con, and I was involved in organizing the second one, in October 1991. I was the art show director, helped get Barry Beyerstein invited as a science guest, and did miscellaneous other things, including designing the logo you […]
+
4:25 PM | Hello, Anana, Hello Fall
[…]
+
4:08 PM | Arabidopsis Research Round-up
These Arabidopsis Research Round-ups are usually posted on the main GARNet website (and still will be) but we’re also going to start posting them here. We were recently approached by the Arabidopsis Information Portal to ask if we could make the Round-ups available for their website too, and it’s easier for us to do that[...]
+
4:07 PM | LifeScanner
Unpacked and ready to go.Do you want to know which bug just ate all the tomato plants in your backyard? Do you want to know what fish species you just had for dinner? Do you want to know what mysterious animal roams around in the nearby park but all you have is a couple of hairs it left behind?As announced via twitter yesterday - I have received my LifeScanner kit and as promised here is my blog post about the first encounter. Actually it wasn't the first, as my wife got a kit earlier […]
+
3:56 PM | Bacterial Gifts
+
3:55 PM | Plastic Bear Honey and the “Terroir” of Industrial Food
It’s August.  Welcome to the days of summer honey. If you are only familiar with the mass-produced product in squeezable plastic bears, you may think that there is just one honey and that it is of uniform golden colour and singular mild flavour. That’s what I used to believe until I started frequenting farmers’ markets […]
+
3:18 PM | Death by Vespa
The most dangerous thing in Italy other than the narrow mountain roads enclosed by rocky walls are Vespas. There are two ways to die by Vespa, at least as TPP sees it. Death of the first kind deals strictly with Vespa drivers who dart in and out of traffic, even if the bother to throw out a hand signal before cutting into your lane, or cutting between buses and trucks at the rare stop sign, or zipping to the front of traffic lines. Even with reasonable vigilance TPP has almost creamed a couple […]
+
3:06 PM | ABS 2014: Social Learning in an Australian Skink
Martin Whiting of Macquarie University began his talk at the Animal Behaviour Society 2014 meeting by lamenting how little we know about the social lives of lizards, especially when compared with mammals, certain insects and fish, and most of all, those pesky other reptiles, birds. But the more we examine lizard social behaviour and cognition, the […]
+
3:00 PM | Stevia hits the mainstream with ‘Life’
Last year Aurélien Azam blogged about Stevia in his post, Can we find all the tastes we like in the Wild? He mentions Stevia in it and if you don’t remember it, then Coca Cola will try to change that. Stevia is the plant behind the new Coke variety, Life. Stevia rebaudiana leaves are complicated […]
+
2:36 PM | Estimating how many people need treatment during an Ebola outbreak
Today the Wellcome Trust has announced a multi-million pound funding package to support research during the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa. There’s no sign of an end to the outbreak and many people believe things will get worse before they get better, so it’s important to understand the scale of the challenge we face. […]
+
2:11 PM | Jason Says Watch for Four Lion Cubs in Fall
+
2:08 PM | Learning thresholds
Kim Goodsell was not a scientist, but she wanted to understand the baffling constellation of disease symptoms that were affecting her. The doctors delivered partial diagnoses, that accounted for some of her problems, but not all. So she plunged into the scientific literature herself. The point of the linked article is that there is a…
+
2:00 PM | Getting grumpy about PMS paper
On 11 August 2014, Michael R. Gillings published a paper in Evolutionary Applications entitled “Were there evolutionary advantages to premenstrual syndrome?” There is a strain of thinking that is common in the general public, but is also frequently found among academic researchers … Continue reading →
+
1:46 PM | What would analog genetics look like?
How about another of those non-awkward Dawkins Twitter questions? Although this one actually is kind of awkward, in a non-offensive way. I don’t quite know what it means. Does evolution rely upon digital genetics? Could there be an analogue genetics? What features of life have to be true all over the universe? I don’t understand…
+
1:27 PM | What’s the Answer? (new Ensembl stuff)
Biostars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at Biostars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]
+
1:19 PM | The Molecular Biology Code
“You’re pirates. Hang the code. Hang the rules. They’re more like guidelines anyway.”              Elizabeth, The Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl Molecular biology, the overall practice of manipulating DNA sequences using biological scissors and glue, is a major component of any modern research lab. Its techniques have been revolutionary […]
+
1:16 PM | Yoshiki Sasai: stem cell Sensei
This obituary first appeared in Development.   Stefano Piccolo looks back at the life and research of his friend and colleague Yoshiki Sasai.   On 5 August 2014, Yoshiki Sasai died at the age of 52, near to the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan. This is the institute that he had helped to establish and painstakingly […]
+
1:09 PM | Crash course in medical history
Opponents of animal research often portray two of the pioneers of experimental physiology, François Magendie (1783-1855) and his student Claude Bernard (1813-1878), as deranged, vicious, and sadistic individuals who derived pleasure in harming animals. Moral philosophers Peter Singer and Lori … Continue reading →
+
12:51 PM | Do ‘green’ access strategies actually achieve public access?
I note with interest that article publication charge data from the University of Edinburgh has been released on Figshare today. There are some fascinating numbers in there and I applaud the transparency. One particular article that took my eye is this one: Paradoxical effects of heme arginate on survival of myocutaneous flaps Page charges were … Read more →
+
12:37 PM | Workshop held on future of Invasive Species Compendium
Originally posted on CABI Invasives Blog:Members of the Invasive Species Consortium from the US, Mexico, Caribbean and South Pacific met in Washington DC on 4 August and unanimously agreed to keep the Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) an open access resource for a further five years. The ISC has been resourced by a diverse international…
5678910111213
1,279 Results