Posts

July 18, 2014

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1:00 PM | Stuff online, feet of clay edition
This week, at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! Dismantling A Troublesome Inheritance, part III: has natural selection created differences between racial groups? And at The Molecular Ecologist: Further thoughts on peer review. Not a great week. A series of not … Continue reading →
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12:51 PM | Scientists Create Alcohol-Resistant Worms That Might Cure Alcoholism
Image showing the effects of alchohol in Caenorhabditis elegans and..humansCredit: Jon Pierce-Shimomura from The University of Texas, Austin.A couple of days ago, a team of neuroscientists from the University of Texas, Austin announced that they have created a new strain of mutant worms which is impervious to the intoxicating effects of alcohol!To create the alcohol-immune worms, the researchers implanted a modified human alcohol target – a neuronal channel called the BK channel […]

Davis, S., Scott, L., Hu, K. & Pierce-Shimomura, J. (2014). Conserved Single Residue in the BK Potassium Channel Required for Activation by Alcohol and Intoxication in C. elegans, Journal of Neuroscience, 34 (29) 9562-9573. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0838-14.2014

Citation
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12:37 PM | ALF Claims Responsibility for CALAS National Office Vandalism
On Tuesday, July 15, an act of vandalism occurred near the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science National Office in Toronto, ON.  There were no injuries and a police investigation is ongoing. The extremist website Bite Back published an unsigned … Continue reading →
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12:03 PM | La più dettagliata mappa di Marte
In attesa di raggiungere Marte nel 2030 (come previsto dai piani della Nasa), per ora dovete accontentarvi di pianificare il vostro futuro soggiorno sul Pianeta Rosso. E come ogni buon viaggiatore sa bene, per farlo è fondamentale avere una mappa. Una fortuna quindi che lo United States Geological Survey (Usgs) ne abbia appena pubblicata una, e anche la più dettagliata mai realizzata, in cui vengono raccolte le informazioni collezionate da quattro spedizioni spaziali nell'arco di […]
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12:00 PM | Seed dormancy and parasitic plants – this week in Annals of Botany
Exciting new plant science in Annals of Botany this week.
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12:00 PM | Insects as the Food of the Future
You might cringe at the thought of eating insects – but for over 2 billion people on the planet, insects are a part of the everyday diet. With the human population expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, coupled to… Read more › The post Insects as the Food of the Future appeared first on Ricochet Science.
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11:53 AM | Friday Cephalopod: You don’t need knees to be mobile
I’m suddenly seeing more to admire in the beautiful octopus.
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11:30 AM | Flump – Scorpion burrows, J-lo mites, and Darwin’s library
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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11:24 AM | HHMI Unveils Lizard Classroom Exercises to Teach Evolutionary Concepts
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute earlier this year introduced a short film on anoles for use in teaching principles of evolution to high school and science biology classes. Now they’ve come up with a fabulous set of online class exercises to be used in conjunction with the film, the Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab! I have […]
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11:09 AM | The Ten-legged Spider
Every word in the title is a lie. The creature I’d like to introduce isn’t a spider and it doesn’t …Continue reading →
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10:57 AM | Open Notebook Science: also for cheminformatics
Last Monday the Jean-Claude Bradley Memorial Symposium was held in Cambridge (slide decks). Jean-Claude was a remarkable man and I spoke at the meeting on several things and also how he made me jealous with his Open Notebook Science work. I had the pleasure to work with him on a RDF representation of solubility data.It took me a long time to group my thoughts and write the abstract I submitted to the meeting:I always believed that with Open Data, Open Source, and Open Standards I was doing the […]
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9:00 AM | Leishmania parasites: neglected tropical killers
Later this year I will be visiting The Gambia in West Africa to work on a GirlGuiding community project. Before I go I will need to have some vaccinations to protect me from several of the diseases found there. Unsurprisingly, … Continue reading →
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9:00 AM | On the mythology of natural selection: Part IV. Functional selection
Not all evolutionary change has to be based on overpopulation and resulting vicious competition for scarce resources in a cruel and bloody Nature.  Yesterday, we suggested that organismal selection, a kind of inverted natural selection, is another means by which adaptive complex traits could arise.  But there are others.Functional selectionMulticellular organisms develop from single cells. A cell is a very complex structure with all sorts of components.  Genomes code for hundreds […]
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8:32 AM | Friday links
A last link on the facebook saga makes the observation that if facebook just includes some randomness in all decisions of what to show on the stream (which they might do just to improve their service), then any study which leverages this … Continue reading →
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8:23 AM | De overheid mag zich wel eens wat méér met onze gezinnen bemoeien
Scandinavische landen staan bekend als de beste landen om te wonen met kleine kinderen. De voordelen vallen zelfs al op bij een korte reis, zo kwam ik begin deze maand achter toen ik voor werk in Finland was, mijn tweede werkweek na mijn bevallingsverlof. Voorzieningen zijn een stuk beter, en de overheidsbemoeienis heeft ook een positief effect op de gezondheid van de volgende generatie. Mijn... Lees meer op www.sciencepalooza.nl
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7:59 AM | Anti-Evolutionists Need to Stop Talking About Thermodynamics
The anti-evolutionists just never get tired of the second law thermodynamics! The latest bit of silliness comes from Barry Arrington, writing at Uncommon Descent. Here’s the whole post: I hope our materialist friends will help us with this one. As I understand their argument, entropy is not an obstacle to blind watchmaker evolution, because entropy…
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7:00 AM | The Doctor Who Thought Your Nose Was Connected To Your You-Know-What
Wilhelm Fleiss might have been a doctor, but he had some pretty weird ideas about the human body. This 19th-century physician thought the nose was hooked up to the genitals and caused all sorts of sexual, physical, and mental problems. Fleiss also believed these nose-related illnesses (which he dubbed "nasal reflex neuroses") could only be cured by surgery . . . a belief which ended badly for a woman named Emma Eckstein. The post The Doctor Who Thought Your Nose Was […]
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6:32 AM | Observadora del mar argentino
Valeria Mango pertenece al grupo de más de cincuenta observadores a bordo de buques comerciales del Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero (INIDEP) Argentino. Su tarea es hacer un seguimiento in situ sobre la actividad pesquera, recabando información fundamental para una explotación responsable del recurso. Entre mates virtuales y Skype, nos dedicó esta entrevista. Preservar los recursos naturales El INIDEP asesora a la […]
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6:00 AM | Image of the Week: Eye Contact
We’re used to looking in windows, but what if they were able to look back? The image above captures a moment from the new window display on show at Wellcome Trust HQ – an art installation called “Eye Contact”. This artwork consists of over 650 coloured boxes lit by over 16,000 LEDs, which together form […]
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6:00 AM | PHOTO DU BoB-176
No summary available for this post.
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3:16 AM | Online Access to Charles Darwin’s Beagle Library
Dr. John van Wyhe, at the University of Singapore, recently spearheaded work to re-create the lost library of Charles Darwin’s days aboard the Beagle. Using the evolutionary scientist’s notes, letters, and books, as well as crew members’ letters, Dr. Wyhe’s team collected over 400 texts which had been housed in the ship’s poop deck, furthermore organizing them into an […]
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2:13 AM | Artscape
If you are in the Baltimore want to see Michele Banks and her fabulous science art in person, you can visit her at Artscape tomorrow through the rest of the weekend (18-20 July). Remember, our artists can’t support themselves.  Filed … Continue reading →

July 17, 2014

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10:26 PM | What can I do with maps…?
I’m trying to learn a little about Github (because, well, I don’t know. I feel like I should). A few random clicks brought me to the Leaflet project. And it got me thinking about what I could – and should … Continue reading →
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10:05 PM | Zombie symposium outbreak
The latest issue of Integrative and Comparative Biology is now out! And the cover story comes from one of the papers from the parasite symposium I co-organized with Kelly Weinersmith! It’s been three years in the making, and I want to tell you how it all happened.It all started with #SciFund.I sometimes tell students, “You never know who’s going to walk through your door,” as a way of saying that research and career opportunities and plans are often completely […]
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10:05 PM | Can We Genetically Engineer the Wilderness? Should We?
There’s a new way to edit DNA. It’s called CRISPR, and it’s taking science by storm. Its versatility …
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9:40 PM | "Avian Dinosaur" Devours Small Mammal
Watch this avian dinosaur hunt a small furry mammal  http://t.co/Ac6JccALeP— Jason G. Goldman (@jgold85) July 17, 2014
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9:35 PM | "I Choose My Enrichment Item"
Yellowstone wolf fail to respect the Cone Zone (video) http://t.co/HSDMUE9qmn via @WolfPolitico @Howling4Justice pic.twitter.com/bKeAWbJAkh— Paul Rauber (@paulrauber) July 17, 2014
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7:39 PM | I wonder why women find themselves discouraged from pursuing science careers?
In case you hadn’t heard yet, Science magazine is making a play to reach the supermarket checkout aisle and tabloid market, with exciting new covers featuring sexy womanly body parts and leaving out pointless details like their faces. I don’t know, they could have taken it a step further and featured dramatically posed dead sexy…
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7:31 PM | Your non-model organism is going extinct
“There is no such thing as a non-model organism” R. Behringer This bold statement was announced less than a week into our Embryology course and has left a lasting impression on lecturers and students alike. At first it seemed like a sympathetic statement to the extensive and diverse systems us students were arriving from… “yeah, […]
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6:15 PM | De Loys’ Ape and what to do with it
Purely because the time feels about right, I thought I’d post an excerpt from the cryptozoology-themed book that John Conway, Memo Kosemen and myself published last year –... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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