Posts

April 21, 2015

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11:45 PM | Growth of mining on land may promote invasions at sea
Wild ThingsAnimals,Oceans by Sarah Zielinski 7:46pm, April 21, 2015 Northern Pacific seastars gang together off a pier in Australia. The species was transported to Australian waters in the ballast of ships. A new study finds that the growth of the Australian mining industry may help promote such invasions.Saspotato/Flickr (CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0)Some 90 percent of the world’s trade spends at […]
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11:12 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Predatory credit score-based insurance fees The achievement gap: whose problem is it? The Dangerous Myth of Appomattox The solution to Ghost Apartments is Obvious, and Not Done White womens feminisms still center around equality. Black womens feminisms demand justice Report … Continue reading →
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11:00 PM | Wolves Are Kinder, More Tolerant Than Dogs
The finding has animal experts puzzling over what led to domestication of man's best friend.
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9:39 PM | Only Three Wolves Remain on Michigan's Isle Royale
Since 2009 the wolves have been rapidly declining in numbers, dropping from 24 to just 3 in six years.
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9:34 PM | Breathless: How blood-oxygen levels regulate air intake
A UChicago team unravels the mysterious process of how the body detects oxygen levels in the blood to regulate breathing rates.
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7:43 PM | Mystery Seed of the Week 246
Our seeds today are not quite mature. I had to pick the pods early because the seeds shoot out when the pods are mature. Although they look like lima beans in size and shape, these seeds are from a tree. … Continue reading →
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7:30 PM | Publication Summary: Dark Field Microscopy Makes Nanoparticles Light Up
This post is part of our ongoing series of public-friendly summaries describing research articles that have been published by members of the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology. Katie Hurley and Nathan Klein, a doctoral mentor/undergraduate mentee team at the University of Minnesota, were co-first authors on this paper. Katie says, “In this post I want to point […]
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4:56 PM | Discoveries of the week #35
Hisonotus vespucciiA new species of Hisonotus is described from the rio São Francisco basin. The new species can be distinguished from congeners by having (1) a unique coloration pattern of caudal fin with one black spot extending from its origin to the ventral lobe and two dark spots at the end of the lobe’s rays; (2) odontodes forming longitudinally aligned rows on head and trunk; (3) a functional V-shaped spinelet; (4) a single rostral plate at the tip of the snout; (5) by […]
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4:19 PM | Five Great Nectar Plants for Butterfly Gardens
For our mystery seed post last week we had 5 seeds from flowers that are great nectar plants for butterfly gardens. And the mystery seeds were (drum roll)…. 1. Echinacea – coneflowers (perennial) (Public domain photograph by Bobbi Jones at … Continue reading →
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4:15 PM | Immune cells support good gut bacteria in fight against harmful bacteria
An immune cell protein helps good bacteria fight harmful pathogens in the gut, reports UChicago's Yang-Xin Fu, which could lead to new treatments that fight infections by promoting a healthy gut microbiome.
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3:58 PM | England, embryos, and axial columns: a Travelling Fellowship connecting Chicago to Cambridge
Greetings from Chicago! My name is Kate Criswell and I am a graduate student at the University of Chicago, working with Dr. Mike Coates on axial column evolution and development in fishes. I just finished up a five-week visit, sponsored by the Development Travelling Fellowship, to the University of Cambridge to work with Dr. Andrew […]
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3:52 PM | When Darwin Met Another Ape
On March 28, 1838, Charles Darwin paid a visit to the London Zoo. At age 29, he was far from the …
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2:45 PM | Interview with Beddington Medal winner John Robert Davis
Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. The 2015 award went to John Robert Davis, who did his PhD with Brian Stramer at King’s College, London. We caught up with John at the BSCB/BSDB Spring meeting, where he gave a talk, […]
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2:00 PM | Remembering the Sedgwick Museum
Yesterday, we featured a lovely Lego sculpture of a running fox by Bangoo H. As one might expect, that was not Bangoo H’s only biologically inspired work. My eye was caught by this depiction of a velociraptor skeleton, which instantly … Continue reading →
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1:29 PM | Beaver Knocks Down Tree, Thousands Lose Power
A Maine beaver was just doing what beavers do -- but its busy work happened to knock down a major transmission line.
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1:03 PM | Mocking up the Plantwise Knowledge Bank
This blog post is different to those you might usually read on the Plantwise blog. It is a little tour behind the scenes of the Plantwise Knowledge Bank, telling you about how we design features for our website and mobile. Let us know if you’re interested in hearing more about how we develop the Knowledge […]
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1:00 PM | New Apocalypse Weird book release: Genesis, by Stefan Bolz
Apocalypse Weird is still in full publishing mode, with April featuring two new book releases: Medium Talent, by Forbes West (featured on the blog last week), and Genesis, by Stefan Bolz, author of The Three Feathers and The Fourth Sage.This is the story of the very beginning of an apocalyptic event as seen through the eyes of an eighteen-year-old girl. Nothing could have prepared her for what is about to happen and she has to face some seriously tough stuff before the end. During the […]
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12:38 PM | Gardening with ME: My Favourite Gardening Tool
While it often easy to just choose the cheapest tools for gardening, it can quickly become a chore to use and maintain them if they're not ideal for your garden or your physical abilities.Websites such as Thrive have a section with tools that can make gardening easier and the telegraph has a slideshow of interesting tools. I like the look of these tools and think that whether or not someone has a disability, they can be very useful.Prior to ME I would always use full length tools, such as […]
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12:36 PM | If only all science were this reproducible
For our course this year I was planning a standard neurogenetic experiment. I hadn’t ever done this experiment in a course, yet, just two weeks ago I tried it once myself, with an N=1. The students would get two groups […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...

Kaun, K., Riedl, C., Chakaborty-Chatterjee, M., Belay, A., Douglas, S., Gibbs, A. & Sokolowski, M. (2007). Natural variation in food acquisition mediated via a Drosophila cGMP-dependent protein kinase, Journal of Experimental Biology, 210 (20) 3547-3558. DOI: 10.1242/​jeb.006924

Citation
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12:31 PM | Tuesday Crustie: Opportunistic
My field work is on a sandy beach, so there are not very many hard surfaces available for organisms to settle on. So I don’t expect to find these crustaceans when I was at the beach on the weekend...Barnacles! Some variety of gooseneck barnacle, I reckon, growing on some sort of floating seed (I think). I love that they would just keep extending their feeding legs (cirri, pretty calmly, even though I was holding them out of the water.
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11:55 AM | How tree species fill geographic and ecological space in North America
Ecologists broadly accept that the number of species present within a region balances regional processes of immigration and speciation against competitive and other interactions between populations that limit distribution and constrain diversity. Although ecological...
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11:41 AM | Mental health: how much does the UK spend on research?
Mental health issues affect millions of people in the UK, but comparatively little is spent on research into these conditions. Wellcome Trust funding helped establish the charity MQ, with the aim of supporting much needed research into mental health. Neil Balmer, Head of Communications at MQ, explains the findings of their recent report ‘UK Mental […]
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11:30 AM | The Beast of the Jungle: Jaguars in Belize
Of all of the animals in Belize- the howler monkey, the puma or cougar, or the peccary- it is the jaguar that is the most visible, both as a national symbol for the nation and as a flagship species for conservation in the small Central American nation. Belize is the only one in the region in which English is its official language and a country in which a thriving ecotourism industry has driven conservation efforts to a scale beyond that of many Central and South American nations. Yet even in […]
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10:57 AM | Oms, l’Europa deve ancora investire nelle vaccinazioni
Nella settimana dell’immunizzazione, l’Oms ricorda l’importanza delle vaccinazioni. Per proteggerci, risparmiare ed evitare il ritorno di vecchie malattie
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9:00 AM | Two years on: what science blogging has done for me
This week marks the second birthday of this blog, which I started while I was in the final year of study for a PhD. At the time I was considering my next steps after finishing my studies. I wasn’t entirely sure what direction to take so I started blogging to give me more practice at […]
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7:56 AM | Cancro al pancreas: trasformare le cellule malate in cellule sane
Uno studio condotto sui topi ha trovato una proteina capace di legarsi al Dna e di riprogrammare le cellule cancerose dell’adenocarcinoma pancreatico, facendole evolvere in cellule sane
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7:33 AM | La resistenza agli antibiotici anche nelle tribù isolate
Appartengono al gruppo etnico degli Yanomami, e non avevano mai avuto contatto con il resto della civiltà umana. Eppure, i “loro” batteri sono resistenti agli antibiotici
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7:00 AM | Tolkien Created Elvish Before He Wrote His Famous Novels
Most people are aware that J.R.R. Tolkien is best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. However, he was first and foremost a philologist, one who studies language. He had an immense interest in language syntax and construction and began creating his Elvish languages many years before he published the now-famous novels. The post Tolkien Created Elvish Before He Wrote His Famous Novels appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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6:59 AM | El tiempo vuela cuando lo pasas bien
   Ciencia Digital cumple hoy dos años. Desde que nació lo han visitado más de 13600 personas, la mayoría de las cuales son de España, obviamente. Le siguen EE. UU. y México. El mapa de visitantes ha cambiado respecto al … Sigue leyendo →
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6:00 AM | Photo 450 : Une araignée qui a du piquant !
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