Posts

October 22, 2014

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6:00 PM | Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
The drug, developed with the help of Yusuke Nakamura and his lab, inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types, including lung and breast.
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5:38 PM | Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do...
Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do non-human primates like chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys respond to inequity or unfairness the way humans do? Georgia State psychologist and neuroscientist, Sarah Brosnan is interested in finding out. Brosnan studies the behavior of primates to better understand how they make decisions and cooperate with one another. By: National Science Foundation.
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5:00 PM | Deinocheirus Exposed: Meet The Body Behind the Terrible Hand
For 50 years, the dinosaur was just a pair of arms. But what arms! Each was eight feet …
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5:00 PM | Science Snaps: peering inside an expanding lymph node
Our scientists have shown for the first time how lymph nodes swell during infection, producing some striking images along the way.
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5:00 PM | Humpback Dino Was Literally Unsinkable
A dinosaur nicknamed Horrible Hands turns out not to have been so horrible, but it sported a suite of unusual features including a humpback, super long arms and sink-proof legs.
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4:49 PM | Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for...
Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for the position of an object over time can be used to calculate the velocity and acceleration of the object. If a net force acts on a object it will experience an acceleration. By: Bozeman Science.
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4:41 PM | Nuclear heartburn: even IEA says solar could become world’s dominant energy source
Originally posted on GreenWorld:IEA projections for solar PV by region. Sending chills down the spine of nuclear and coal utility executives across the world, the International Energy Agency (IEA) yesterday released two reports that assert solar power could become the dominant source of global electricity production by mid-century. This is the same IEA that…
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4:31 PM | France and nuclear power: the end of the affair is coming?
Originally posted on nuclear-news:Is France’s Love Affair with Nuclear Over? Oil Price, By Chris Dalby | Sun, 19 October 2014  French President Francois Hollande has promised to limit the growth of the country’s nuclear power, many older reactors have been targeted for decommissioning, and Greenpeace and other environmental groups have been relentless in their anti-nuclear campaigning. But…
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4:27 PM | Aging reactors: a failure to plan that will haunt nuclear utilities
Originally posted on GreenWorld:Exelon’s aging GE Mark I reactors at Peach Bottom. Photo by cryptome.org One reason that giant nuclear utilities like Exelon, Entergy, Duke and others are so aggressively taking extraordinary steps to force ratepayers to keep their obsolete, aging reactors operating at any cost is that these utilities have failed to adequately…
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4:21 PM | Vermont Yankees Says Shutdown to Cost $1.24 Billion
By Michelle Mei 19 October 2014 by Pat Bradley at WAMC Northeast Public Radio Listen to the broadcast here: http://wamc.org/post/vermont-yankee-says-shutdown-cost-124-billion The Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant has released a new estimate of what it will cost to decommission the reactor, manage high-level radioactive waste and restore the plant site. The estimate of about $1. http://afscwm.org/2014/10/21/vermont-yankees-says-shutdown-cost-1-24-billion/ This […]
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4:00 PM | Imprinting, epigenetic markers and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)
Epigenetics refers to changes in gene regulation that are do not related to changes in the primary sequence of DNA. It can be reversible and heritable throughout cell division, and its regulation is characterized by several modifications, such as DNA methylation and post-translational changes in the histone proteins. In addition, ... The post Imprinting, epigenetic markers and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) appeared first on EpiBeat.
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3:11 PM | Post-doc and research assistant positions in Drosophila planar polarity
Two Wellcome Trust-funded positions are available for candidates with a background in cell and/or developmental biology to join an interdisciplinary team investigating cell signalling and coordinated cell polarisation using Drosophila epithelial development as a model system. The Strutt lab (http://www.shef.ac.uk/bms/research/strutt) studies cell signalling and coordinated cell polarisation in animal tissues via analysis of the “core” […]
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3:04 PM | Synchronizing mitochondrial metabolism
Mitochondria are fidgeters. That’s what researchers discovered in a recent study. The organelles undergo waves in ATP production. Furthermore, the mitochondria, like synchronized dancers, work in a coordinated fashion. A team at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research report in a paper just out in the journal Cell Reports that mitochondria in the […]
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3:03 PM | Biological Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
hemlock woolly adelgidThe hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), a native of Asia, is a <1 mm long reddish purple insect that lives within its own protective coating. White, woolly masses that shelter these sap-feeding insects can be found at the bases of hemlock needles along infested branches. The presence of these white sacs, which resemble tiny cotton balls, indicate that a tree is infested. The hemlock woolly adelgid is a threat to North American hemlock forests. As of 2007, 50% of […]
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2:42 PM | Il pericolo di giudicare gli altri dal loro aspetto
"Anche se ci piace pensare che i nostri giudizi e le nostre scelte siano razionali, imparziali, coerenti e basati unicamente su informazioni pertinenti, la verità è che sono spesso influenzati da fattori superficiali e irrilevanti", afferma Christopher Olivola della Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business di Pittsburgh, negli Stati Uniti, commentando la sua ultima ricerca. In […]
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2:25 PM | New Phylogeny for Amazonian Dactyloa Anoles: Multiple Evolution of Horns, Dewlap Color Evolution, New Divergence Time Estimates
In a fascinating new paper, Ivan Prates and colleagues report on a phylogenetic analysis of Amazonian Dactyloa clade anoles with implications for a number of important topics in anole evolution. The authors generated new mitochondrial and nuclear gene data for many Amazonian Dactyloa and combined those data with existing data from previous studies. Of particular note […]
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2:17 PM | Wildlife Photography of the Year 2014: gli scatti vincenti
Si stringono gli uni agli altri per superare il freddo della notte i babbuini gelada ritratti in questa foto premiata come “Winning Images” dal Wildlife Photography of the Year2014. A realizzarla il fotografo italiano Simone Sbaraglia, arrampicatosi su un’altura dei monti Simien, sull’altipiano etiopico, a 4500 metri di altitudine, dove questa specie di primati erbivori ha trovato rifugio. Il vincitore della 50esima edizione del contest di fotografia naturalistica […]
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2:12 PM | Paralisi, primi passi dopo un trapianto di cellule
Diverse coltellate sferrate alla schiena nel 2010. Midollo spinale lacerato. Conseguenza: paralisi totale dal torace in giù. La vita di Darek Fidyka, quarantenne polacco, sembrava destinata a proseguire su una sedia a rotelle. Ma un’équipe di scienziati polacchi e britannici è riuscita, sorprendentemente, a ridargli speranza: come raccontano su Cell Transplantation, hanno eseguito un trapianto di cellule dalla cavità nasale di Fidyka al suo midollo […]
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2:07 PM | Curiosity Unleashed: Wisconsin Science Festival 2014
“Oh wait Mom, look, bugs!” And she was off. The next thing I knew she had a pale greenish-blue tobacco hornworm caterpillar in her hand. “I’ve never seen anything like this before.” Nor had I. She turned it upside down and started tickling its legs with a finger of her free hand. “What does it […]
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2:00 PM | The Art of Science: Claire Moynihan’s Beautiful Bugs
British textile artist Claire Moynihan riffs on traditional insect collections with her “bug balls” – tiny hand-embroideries of insects on felted wool balls. Moynihan uses a variety of embroidery techniques and materials which allow her to produce highly dimensional effects. … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Why women leave academia?
UK Resource Centre for Women in SET recently posted a study that found that only 12% of female late stage PhD students intend to pursue a career in academia. The Guardian does an excellent job summarizing the findings, as well as explaining why this is a terrible thing.  
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2:00 PM | Jones: the trembling town
Jones is a small city located in the state of Oklahoma, in the Central United States. In Science Magazine we can read that the town […] Read more The post Jones: the trembling town appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Admitting our ignorance: unexpected earthquakes under the magnifying glass Mantle convective flow determines the depth of the ocean 49 open questions in geoscience
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1:46 PM | Video Tip of the Week: SeqMonk
Always on the lookout for effective visualization tools, I recently came across a series of videos about the SeqMonk software. It’s not software that I had used before, so I wanted to look at the videos, and then try it out. It downloaded quickly, offered me an extensive list of genomes to load up, and […]

Chatterjee A., P. A. Stockwell, E. J. Rodger & I. M. Morison (2012). Comparison of alignment software for genome-wide bisulphite sequence data, Nucleic Acids Research, 40 (10) e79-e79. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gks150

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1:00 PM | National Agricultural Library (NAL) Joins BHL!
We are pleased to announce that the USDA National Agricultural Library (NAL) has joined the Biodiversity Heritage Library as a BHL Affiliate. BHL has already ingested over 845,000 pages of NAL-digitized content made openly available within the Internet Archive. This formal partnership will allow us to strengthen our collection of agricultural-related content through direct collaboration with NAL.The National Agricultural Library (NAL) comprises one of the largest collections of materials […]
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12:01 PM | Coelopleurus! The most gorgeous urchin you never heard of!
This week, I thought I'd share some gorgeous sea urchin love! Behold Coelopleurus! What's that? You've never HEARD of Coelopleurus??  Well, that's about right, I suppose. Its a distinctive looking enough species but it lives in slightly deeper water than is typical for most casual SCUBA divers or vacationing snorkelers..Described by Louis Agassiz in 1840, Coelopleurus is a genus in the family Arbaciidae. There are about 14 known species. Eleven living species and four fossils. […]
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12:00 PM | Ureide accumulation and drought inhibition of N2fixation
A study of common bean genotypes, with variable degrees of N2-fixation tolerance to water stress, finds variable accumulation of ureides in their leaves.
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12:00 PM | Natural selection at the movies: Only the bad guys evolve
It’s almost Halloween, and if you’re anything like me, you celebrate the season by watching scary movies. Although the horror movie marathon is a typical annual tradition of mine, this year I set out with a specific task: to identify as many movies as possible where the villain is somehow associated with evolution by natural […]
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12:00 PM | Should you reply to spamming students?
A colleague, who is a new assistant professor, asked on Facebook, if he should reply to an “endless” stream of emails from international students.I know the kinds of letters this person is asking about. Many show the candidate has extremely limited ability to express him or herself in written English, the tone is often obsequious, and the letters are often clearly “form” letters send to who knows how many institutions.What’s the right course of action? On the one […]
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12:00 PM | Death By Haunted House
Halloween is a time when fear is invited. The rush of adrenaline in a controlled environment is life-affirming. Not much else to comment on here, except that he seems to have excellent oral hygiene for a chainsaw-wielding maniac.A big man with the chainsaw and the gaping wound on his face jumps out from around the corner and growls. You leap backward and scream, your heart pounding in your ears. You’re ready to either take that power tool and teach him a lesson or to run like the kid from […]

Greek, R. (2012). Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing. By Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers. Knopf Doubleday Publishing: New York, NY, USA, 2012; Hardback, 320 pp; $16.23; ISBN-10: 0307593487, Animals, 2 (4) 559-563. DOI: 10.3390/ani2040559

Volchan, E., Souza, G., Franklin, C., Norte, C., Rocha-Rego, V., Oliveira, J., David, I., Mendlowicz, M., Coutinho, E., Fiszman, A. & Berger, W. (2011). Is there tonic immobility in humans? Biological evidence from victims of traumatic stress, Biological Psychology, 88 (1) 13-19. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.06.002

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11:30 AM | Same Voice, Different Sound
We all hate the sound of our own voices. When you record your voice and and then play the sound back, you often often discover that the voice on the recorder sounds much different than the voice you are accustomed to hearing. The reasoning for this has to do with the path or paths sound takes to reach the ear drum. When listening to someone else speak, air conduction brings the sound through the auditory canal and to the ear drum. The same thing occurs when a person hears their own voice, […]
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