Posts

October 28, 2014

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2:28 PM | Congratulations to Emily Willingham & David Grimes
It makes me very happy to share the announcement that our friend Dr. Emily Willingham is joint winner of the 2014 John Maddox Prize for Standing Up for Science. Emily is brave. That isn’t an adjective that one gets to use … Continue reading →
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2:28 PM | Tuesday Crustie: Yeti crab crushes Kremlin!
It’s fair to say I’m a fan of yeti crabs, since I’ve had the yeti crabs on this feature a few times before. (And then there’s the dancing yeti crabs playlist...)I’m also a big fan of the SyFy series FaceOff, which has its season finale tonight. Last week, make-up artist Cig got into the finals with this kaiju creation:Cig had never seen a yeti crab before, and decided to make something decidedly more simian than crustacean, keeping in the giant monster tradition […]
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2:07 PM | Thank You Doctor Salk! (and Drs Enders, Bodian, Landsteiner, Sabin…)
Today’s Google Doodle honours Dr Jonas Salk, who in 1954 created the world’s first effective polio vaccine, which was responsible for launching a campaign that has seen this terrible disease become an increasingly distant memory in most  – though sadly … Continue reading →
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1:51 PM | Tagged Dolphins Adjust by Swimming Slowly
Scientists love the data they get by attaching electronic tags to animals, but these devices can be a literal drag. For animals that fly or swim, tags can mess up their mechanics and force them to spend more energy. That’s what scientists expected to see when they studied dolphins with data loggers suction-cupped to their […]The post Tagged Dolphins Adjust by Swimming Slowly appeared first on Inkfish.

van der Hoop JM, Fahlman A, Hurst T, Rocho-Levine J, Shorter KA, Petrov V & Moore MJ (2014). Bottlenose dolphins modify behavior to reduce metabolic effect of tag attachment., The Journal of experimental biology, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25324344

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1:32 PM | All-expenses-paid networking in Thailand, Mexico, Brazil or Turkey …
Do you fancy an all-expenses-paid trip to a meeting where you can present your work, network with senior researchers in your field, get inspired and eat good food in the sun? If you’re a UK-based early career researcher (of any nationality), it might be closer than you think. And if the days of your ‘early[...]
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1:31 PM | La memoria migliora davvero col cioccolato?
Anno dopo anno, col passare del tempo, non è solo il corpo a cambiare ma anche la mente invecchia e la memoria potrebbe iniziare a giocare qualche scherzo: ricordare il volto di una persona appena conosciuta o il posto in cui si è parcheggiata l’auto diventa più faticoso. Ma a risollevare gli animi, specialmente dei più golosi, ci prova oggi uno studio dei ricercatori del Columbia University Medical Center pubblicato su Nature Neuroscience, suggerendo che […]
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1:31 PM | Five Invertebrates that would be Terrifying if they were Bigger!
The secret of the big terrifying jaws is #1 below! HALLOWEEN! Every year, I like to use the season's festive theme to try and highlight some cool invertebrate diversity! Last year I did an overview of creepy worms and the year before that, I did an overview of spooky things that echinoderms (my research focus & subject of this blog's love) are known to do. So, note that I actually am using REAL aspects of these animal's biology that make them, creepy, terrifying, spooky, whatever. […]
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1:03 PM | La fibra ottica più veloce del mondo
255 terabit al secondo: è questo il nuovo record del mondo di velocità di trasmissione su fibra. A realizzarlo è stato un gruppo di ricercatori olandesi e americani, della Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) e della University of Central Florida (Creol), che in un articolo apparso su Nature Photonics ha illustrato le potenzialità di una nuova fibra ottica, che può superare di ben 20 volte la capacità di banda delle reti attuali. Una possibile […]
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1:00 PM | How do Scientists Study Complex Chemical Systems?
Much of our work in the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology lies in the realm of chemistry. That is to say, our work seeks to understand phenomena at the molecular level. For example, we want to know what molecules we can add to the surface of a nanoparticle to control how stable it is and how […]
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12:18 PM | Peptidoglycan and Proteoglycan
The other day in class I misspoke when I equated Peptidoglycan with Proteoglycan. Being similarly named, I got tongue-tied and confused them and then further confused myself when I tried to clarify. My problem at the time was that I looked to the etymology of the two words to distinguish them and came up short […]
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12:15 PM | Octogoat, the Goat with 8 Legs (Video)
Octogoat with its owner,Zoran PaparicIt's been a long time since I last posted about a strangely deformed animal. So, today I want to present you the story of "Octogoat", a goat that as you have probably guessed was born with 8 legs.The octogoat was born in May 2014, on a farm in Kutjevo, in northeast Croatia."I counted his legs and I thought I was seeing things. Then I called my neighbour to make sure that I am not crazy." said Zoran Paparic's, owner of the farm.The poor creature not only had […]
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12:00 PM | Celebrate diversity: Big babies
The latest additions to “creatures we thought reproduced sexually but turn out to be able to reproduce asexually” is a pretty spectacular one, because one of the two species is one of the biggest snakes in the world.A paper published back in June by Booth and colleagues is suddenly making the rounds on news and social media. It describes research on two python species, the reticulated python (pictured, record holder for longest snake), and the royal python. While the news is […]
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12:00 PM | A Whale of a Tale...The Leviathan
The Devil Whale In the 6th century AD, St. Brendan, an Irish cleric, and eighteen other monks, sailed out from Ireland to cross the ocean. Amidst their journey, they came upon a black, treeless island and decided to make camp for the night. Several monks set up a cooking station and lit a fire. And then the island began to move. Terrified, the monks fled back to their boat, leaving the food and fire behind. St. Brandon urged them not to be afraid; it was simply the great fish Jasconius, […]
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11:26 AM | The Blue-Dewlapped Anole of Grand Cayman
  Not many anoles have blue dewlaps, so we were delighted to see Ann Stafford’s tweet of this lovely  conspersus from Grand Cayman strutting its stuff.
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11:12 AM | The Age of Discovery (How old are people when they do their best scientific research?)
Science is an extremely competitive field, getting research funding requires an excellent track record and researchers judge themselves against their peers. I wrote a blog post about the number of publications scientists are 'supposed' to have per year in order to be competitive on fellowships and grant applications a few years ago. I am surprised at the number of people that find that post by  searching for 'How many research papers should I have?' . It's a worry or thought most […]
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11:02 AM | Fishing for treatments for muscle diseases
Jane Patrick, a PhD student at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, studies zebrafish to learn more about muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy. She explains her work in her commended entry for the 2014 Max Perutz Science […]
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10:40 AM | Empowering UK Universities to Support Their Researchers
The Wellcome Trust has a wide range of funding schemes for researchers and institutions, but we’re also keen to allow universities to define their own priorities and ensure that they are able to support their researchers in a timely manner. The Wellcome Trust’s Institutional Strategic Support Fund (ISSF) is there to do just that, and […]
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9:47 AM | La supermacchia solare e i brillamenti da record
Macchie così, sul Sole, non se ne vedevano dal 1990. Stiamo parlando dell'eccezionale sunspot (macchia solare) che da qualche tempo è visibile sulla nostra stella, grande più o meno quanto il pianeta Giove. Ma la regione AR2192 non è solamente maestosa: è anche straordinariamente attiva. Negli ultimi giorni infatti ha sparato una serie di potenti solar flares (brillamenti solari), improvvisi lampi di luce altamente energetici. I brillamenti solari sono, […]
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9:39 AM | Local refrigeration: Key to reducing #Postharvest losses in Rural areas
Originally posted on Kalu Samuel's Blog:l did bump into this when l visited Eco-Resource centre in Nairobi, Kenya. l got fascinated by the simplicity and its functionality. The simple piece of innovation so ideal for the preservation of vegetables and fruits in areas especially rural where there is no access to electricity. Built…
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9:24 AM | Island of Lemurs – Madagascar
Recently, I had the opportunity to watch a preview screening of the IMAX show “Island of Lemurs – Madagascar” which had recently opened at the Omni-Theatre Singapore on 10 October. It is always an enjoyment for me to watch a nature-themed documentary. The script of “Island of Lemurs – Madagascar” is actually well decorated with… Continue reading »
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9:00 AM | Brain plasticity -- why should intelligence be an exception?
We live in an age that demands we multitask if we're going to get everything done that we need to do.  Answering email, picking up the children, submitting grants for every deadline, getting in 30 minutes of exercise everyday, eating right, keeping up with the literature -- so much pressure.  Fortunately someone's got our backs, and we can now answer email on one screen at our treadmill desks and work on that grant proposal on another, all while we have lunch.  So much easier, so […]
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8:31 AM | Di chi è la Luna?
Avete un po' di soldi da parte e state pensando di comprare una nuova casa per le vacanze, o magari un pezzo di terra? Perché, invece, non compare, a prezzi stracciati, un acro di Luna? Il prezzo, almeno secondo i siti dei venditori di terreno lunare, è di appena €21 ad appezzamento. Scherzi a parte, molte grandi società, imprenditori e persino politici stanno cominciando ad interessarsi al nostro satellite e alle sue risorse, finora rimaste intatte. La Russia, per […]
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7:00 AM | There Is No Reliable Evidence For Repressed Memories
According to some practitioners, if you use the right methods, you can find memories that someone repressed---sometimes of past abuse or even of alien abductions. However, despite the claims of those who try to recover repressed memories, there is no solid evidence for a single provable case. It's not recognized officially by mental health researchers, and many researchers feel that therapists are unwittingly helping people create false memories, rather than finding repressed ones. The post […]
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7:00 AM | PHOTO DU BoB-277
No summary available for this post.
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6:47 AM | XIV Semana de la Ciencia (Madrid)
La Dirección General de Universidades e Investigación de la Comunidad de Madrid a través de la Fundación para el Conocimiento madri+d, organiza la decimocuarta edición de la Semana de la Ciencia de Madrid, con el objetivo de involucrar a los ciudadanos en la ciencia y la tecnología. La XIV Semana de la Ciencia de Madrid es un evento de la ciencia y de la participación ciudadana, ofreciendo al público la oportunidad de conocer de […]
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4:15 AM | Isaiah Berlin, science and the dangers of certainty
Isaiah Berlin (Image: hannaharendt.org)The essence of science is uncertainty. The scientific process gropes, not finds, its way to the truth. And yet there are those who have sought certainty and sacred truth not just in science but in human affairs. In science this illusory search can be a mere annoyance or at worse it can be a recipe for shattered careers and wasted man hours, but in human affairs it can lead to the most horrific tragedies. As Jacob Bronowski poignantly put it in "The Ascent […]
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1:49 AM | Salamanders Regrew Limbs 300 Million Years Ago
Salamanders are the only four-limbed vertebrates which can regrow lost limbs, and exceptionally well-preserved fossils suggest that their early ancestors shared this ability.
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12:11 AM | Leveraging the immune system to fight cancer – Biotech’s...
Leveraging the immune system to fight cancer – Biotech’s future Inventors are using small-scale biology and engineering to find ways to use the body’s natural defenses to effectively treat cancer. NSF-funded small business GigaGen uses microfluidics, bioinformatics and genome sequencing to look for antibodies that may be good candidates for new therapies. GigaGen’s David Johnson explained how at the 2014 BIO International Convention. By: National Science Foundation.

October 27, 2014

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11:22 PM | How Nigeria Avoided An Ebola Outbreak Nigeria and Senegal have...
How Nigeria Avoided An Ebola Outbreak Nigeria and Senegal have been able to keep themselves free of the fatally dangerous ebola disease spread, stopping a massive urban outbreak in one of the largest cities in the entire continent of Africa. How? It wasn’t a quick-fix, but constant vigilance. Kim Horcher, John Iadarola, and Andy Riesmeyer (Host of Dweebcast) discuss! Read more: http://io9.com/how-nigeria-stopped-ebola-dead-in-its-tracks-1648390740 By: Nerd Alert.
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10:59 PM | Breaking Bio Episode 70 – Mistaken sex and rapacious spiders with Dr Emily Burdfield-Steel!
This week, we talk to Dr. Emily Burfield-Steel of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland about her work with species who get confused in the bedroom, how scientists introduce drama into spider sex, and moth farts. Kinda. Show notes: Horny & confused fur seal story & original paper. Emily explains what sexual interference is and(...)
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