Posts

August 22, 2014

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5:14 PM | LabBook August 22, 2014
This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians.
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4:52 PM | The Impact of Environment on Epigenetics and Metal Health
Bulimia Nervosa, a well-known eating disorder is commonly characterized by recurrent binge-eating, subsequent compensatory behaviors, and body image obsession. In addition to these common symptoms, some individuals with BN also suffer from other disorders such as mood fluctuations, anxiety, substance abuse, and personality problems. However, other individuals do not. Due ... The post The Impact of Environment on Epigenetics and Metal Health appeared first on EpiBeat.
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4:30 PM | Genetic 'Recipe' Found for Lizard Tail Regrowth
Research team sequences all the genes expressed during regeneration.
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4:28 PM | Top 10 things about doing a summer internship at the Wellcome Trust
Each year, the Wellcome Trust offers a number of paid summer internships at Trust HQ. These are aimed at giving current undergraduates the chance to experience working an area of the Trust that interests them, and we hope to inspire, support and develop the next generation of people who can make a difference. As the […]
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4:11 PM | Anana "to Breed with a Male Polar Bear"?
Do Lincoln Park Zoo officials or Chicago Sun-Times know something we don't?"...Anana, who was one of the zoo’s most popular attractions, will be headed to North Carolina where the 14-year-old will, it is hoped, breed with a male polar bear, zoo officials said." [Brian Slodysko, Chicago Sun-Times]Of course, we all hope this eventually proves true.For now, the plan is for Ms. Anana to join the older female Patches here.Lincoln Park would probably like to see Anana return: "“Anana […]
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4:00 PM | Sing your spiders away
Just found this in the Metro: Must be something to do with the frequency of his voice, bet it vibrates the web so the spider thinks it either has prey or is being attacked. I am sad that the Metro … Continue reading →
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3:11 PM | What Rosetta can tell us about life on Earth
On August 6th, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft reached the end of its 10-year journey: 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a comet currently hovering in the distance between Mars and Jupiter. While Rosetta’s mission will naturally help scientists understand more about the nature of comets- how they form, what they’re made of, and how old they really are- several of the questions scientists are hoping to answer will actually have the most impact on how we understand how […]
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3:09 PM | Como Zoo Will Get Male & Female Polar Bear
Young Toledo Zoo polar bears will move on to Como Park Zoo soon. “That’s always nice when you can transfer two together, especially when they are young,” said Dr. Randi Meyerson, zoo assistant director of animal programs."Dr. Meyerson coordinates the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Polar Bear Species Survival Plan, which recommends breeding pairs and animal transfers to ensure genetic diversity. She also serves on Polar Bear International’s advisory council […]
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3:00 PM | This spider is doing very well in an urbanized environment, thanks for asking
Urbanization is one of the most dramatic changes humans make to natural habitats. Cities are concentrations of tall buildings, paved landscape, air pollution, and everything else that we do to make life easier for ourselves. But some living things do quite well in these highly altered conditions—think rats and cockroaches, but also red foxes and […]
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2:58 PM | Japan thyroid cancer children – crimes against humanity -
Originally posted on nuclear-news:Tokyo Press Conference: Gov’t is committing crimes against humanity; Fukushima children living in war zone and can’t leave — Childhood cancer developing much faster than Chernobyl; Rate now 14 times higher — Parent: “I’m revealing the reality of what’s going on… it’s only way to get rid of the criminals” (VIDEO)…
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2:00 PM | Against a failing heart, pharmacoepigenomics
The last advances in genetics and genomics are leading a change in the paradigm about how to treat diseases. Epigenetics is the science field […] Read more The post Against a failing heart, pharmacoepigenomics appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Cardiac lycopene – Tomatoes for your heart Life and deeds of RNA (I): William Wallace and the fate of the cell A mediator for horizontal gene transfer between eukaryotes and prokaryotes
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2:00 PM | 5 Very Good Questions
Nature has published a comment by William P. Hanage suggesting ways to inoculate oneself against the hype associated with the burgeoning field of microbiome studies. As Bethany Brookshire (aka, SciCurious) notes, these questions should be applied to any and all research, not just … Continue reading →
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1:42 PM | These Cave Rocks Are Made out of Bacteria
Stalactites hold tight to the ceiling, the saying goes, and stalagmites might grow high enough to reach it. But the simple mnemonic doesn’t come close to covering the variety of weird, rocky shapes growing all over a cave. There are even, it turns out, rocks made from bacteria. They’re not putting the “tight” in “stalactite” so […]The post These Cave Rocks Are Made out of Bacteria appeared first on Inkfish.

Sallstedt, T., Ivarsson, M., Lundberg, J., Sjöberg, R. & Vidal Romaní, J. (2014). Speleothem and biofilm formation in a granite/dolerite cave, Northern Sweden, International Journal of Speleology, 43 (3) 305-313. DOI: 10.5038/1827-806X.43.3.7

Citation
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1:35 PM | Fiat - now and days of yore
The Phactors rented a Fiat 500L diesel, and it's been an impressive car to drive, not at all what TPP expected, but then he hadn't driven a Fiat since a friend had a Spider way back in the mid-1970s there abouts. While parking the rental, TPP was surprised to notice that the tiny car parked in the next space was also a Fiat 500L from about the late 1960s (sorry, really don't know Fiats well at all).  It looked to be in very good shape and probably had the classic, whomping, stomping […]
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1:30 PM | Enhancement: Anthony J. Melchiorri envisions a world of renegade biohackers and the powers to fight them
My guest today is another author who, like me, is fascinated by DNA. And that's not just a coincidence: Anthony Melchiorri is a bioengineer working on tissue engineered blood vessels for children with congenital heart defects. When he's not busy with his research and PhD dissertation, Anthony writes. His first book, Enhancement is a fast-paced, near-future thriller about genetic engineering, organized crime, and the abuse of advanced technology. And now Anthony has two more books coming […]
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1:15 PM | Automata & Humans Need Not Apply
Couple to... And...
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1:04 PM | Friday Fiction Facts: Ray Bradbury on Writing
Welcome to Friday Fiction Facts: sciency things that fiction writers need to know. This is a different kind of Friday Fiction post, but in honor of Ray Bradbury’s birthday today I wanted to share his advice to fiction writers. Yes, I know it’s long. An hour is like 100 years in internet time. But just […]
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1:02 PM | Friday SNPpets
Welcome to our Friday feature link collection: SNPpets. During the week we come across a lot of links and reads that we think are interesting, but don’t make it to a blog post. Here they are for your enjoyment… RT @dgmacarthur: Great story by @edyong209 on a woman who correctly guessed the genetic cause of […]
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1:00 PM | Stuff online, rare genetics and bees edition
Essential reading on Ferguson: Jamelle Bouie’s detailed recounting of the events following Michael Brown’s killing, and just how much it would take to make things right; Ta-Nehisi Coates on the historical historical context; Dahlia Lithwick on the laundry list of … Continue reading →
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12:16 PM | These lizards may be able to learn from each other
An experiment with skinks provides the first evidence of social learning in lizards.
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12:15 PM | The Anoles of La Cumbre, Colombia
We (Rosario Castaneda, Anthony Herrel, Luke Mahler and I) have just completed the first leg of our 2.5 week Colombian anole sojourn. First up: La Cumbre in the hills north of Cali. At  2000 meters, it was chilly! Going out our first night, we found plenty of long-legged Anolis ventrimaculatus. Imagine our surprise the next day when they […]
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12:00 PM | The Surprising Reason Hummingbirds Love Sweets
Scientists have been puzzled by the fact that hummingbirds maintain such a sugary diet without a sweet-taste receptor.
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11:59 AM | Image of the Week: Xenopus
Move over Paul the Octopus, this friendly looking creature can tell if you’re pregnant or not… .. well, sort of. This week’s image is of a Xenopus, a type of aquatic frog native to southern Africa, which was used in pregnancy testing. In the 1930s it was discovered that injecting a woman’s urine into a […]
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11:46 AM | Friday Cephalopod: Dancing on the edge of the abyss
No summary available for this post.
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11:30 AM | Flump – Frozen microbial ecosystems, Primary forests, meta-analysis of genetic diversity studies, maps
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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11:00 AM | TWiM #85: Oscillation in the Ocean and a Verona Integron
Vincent, Elio, Michael, and Michele discuss the diel transcriptional rhythms of bacterioplankton communities in the ocean, and extensively drug resistant Pseudomonas in Ohio.
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10:52 AM | Bizarre flowers, chloride ions and auxin, and the role of pectin in stomatal development – this week in Annals of Botany
All the latest plant science news from Annals of Botany.
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10:28 AM | Botox for stomach cancer? No, but the research is fascinating
We take a look at science behind widespread but overblown media reports that Botox could be used to treat stomach cancer
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9:59 AM | Superman viola le leggi della fisica
Super velocità, super forza, sguardo laser e la capacità di volare, eppure la caratteristica di Superman veramente impossibile sarebbe un’altra. O meglio, a essere fisicamente impossibile sarebbe proprio la fonte dei superpoteri dell’Uomo d’acciaio: la capacità delle sue cellule di assorbire l’energia del Sole. A scoprirlo è stato un gruppo di studenti di fisica della University of Leicester, che in […]
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8:38 AM | Ain’t No Party like a Bring Your Own Data Party!
Data Club is Gonna Show You HowAs science is supposed to be about “standing on the shoulders of giants”, we all know sharing scientific data should be a good thing, but there are obviously large technical and cultural challenges holding things back. Things are a long way from the Jimmy Wales “Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge” utopian dream, but some research fields (e.g. genomics) have done […]
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