Posts

March 30, 2015

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2:19 PM | Animal Justice Project: Same nonsense, different name
When I first took up my job explaining animal science to the public, I thought I would spend much of my time talking about ethics. I was looking forward to it – my academic specialisms within were rights and ethics … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | The future of rice and the rice of the future
Every day, each person on the planet consumes 2868 Kcal, 19% of those calories come from the world’s most important crop, rice, closely followed […] Read more The post The future of rice and the rice of the future appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Cellulose conversion to starch, a promising strategy for future global food demand Smoke-derived chemicals promote seed germination At the crossroads of Botany and Archaeology
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1:59 PM | Mapping rainforest biodiversity
Australian rainforests have been fragmented due to past climatic changes and more recently landscape change as a result of clearing for agriculture and urban spread. The subtropical rainforests of South Eastern Queensland are significantly more fragmented than the tropical World Heritage listed northern rainforests and are subject to much greater human population pressures. The Australian rainforest flora is relatively taxonomically rich at the family level, but less so at the species level. […]
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1:32 PM | Google punta sulla chirurgia robotica
Nei giorni scorsi l’azienda di Montain View ha annunciato un accordo con il colosso farmaceutico Johnson & Johnson per lo sviluppo di una piattaforma di chirurgia robotica
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1:12 PM | Trova tu i nomi per le valli e i crateri di Plutone
A luglio la sonda New Horizon effettuerà il primo flyby su Plutone. Il Seti Institute ha lanciato un concorso internazionale per chiedere a tutti di trovare i nomi da inserire nella mappa del pianeta nano e della sua luna Caronte
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1:05 PM | Mystery Crocodile in Crete Killed by Cold Snap
The animal became an attraction on the Greek island of Crete last year after its mysterious appearance in a lake.
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1:01 PM | Camelid antibodies
The breakthrough discovery that animals from the camel family (camelids include alpacas, camels, llamas, vicuñas and guanacos) produce antibodies with no light chains as part of their repertoire is possibly one of the lesser well known biological breakthroughs. This discovery demonstrated that a single-domain fragment had the ability to bind a target just as wellRead More
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12:54 PM | A Weird Python 3 Unicode Failure
The following code can fail on my system: from os import listdir for f in listdir(‘.’): print(f) Why? UnicodeEncodeError: ‘utf-8′ codec can’t encode character ‘\udce9′ in position 13: surrogates not allowed What? I have a file with the name b’Latin1 … Continue reading →
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12:36 PM | Drug resistance evolves in inbred parasites
It all starts with a mosquito bite. When a hungry mosquito pierces someone’s ski...
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12:15 PM | Course Review: What a Plant Knows
As I've mentioned before, I'm a big fan of the book of the same name and have written quite a bit about it. Last year, I completed the course that's been made available by the folks at Coursera and delivered by none other than the author, Daniel Chamovitz.The course is delivered over 7 weeks via videos, selected readings, and forum discussions. The website states that it take around 3-4 hours a week, but it took me no more than 2 hours a week.It covers much of the same content as the book, such […]
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12:00 PM | Special Issue on Halophytes and Saline Adaptations
Improved knowledge of halophytes is important in understanding our natural world and enabling the use of these fascinating plants in land re-vegetation.
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12:00 PM | When it Comes to Vision, Men and Women Really Aren’t Seeing Eye to Eye
By: Sadie Steffens, 4th year PhD candidate in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program The paint color in our master bathroom has been a source of debate since we bought our house. While I am certain that the color is firmly in the purple part of the spectrum, my husband insists that the paint is blue. Period. Visiting…
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12:00 PM | The Attraction of Magnetotactic Bacteria
by Daniel P. Haeusser | Regular readers of Small Things Considered may recall our mention of the magnetotactic bacteria, organisms that can sense the Earth's magnetic field to orient themselves and distinguish up from down. The magnetotactic bacteria vary greatly in morphology, metabolism, and phylogeny, but they all share a little tool that permits the magnetic sensing underlying their coordinated movement (magnetotaxis).
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11:34 AM | STEM Education Promotes Critical Thinking and Creativity: A Response to Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria recently wrote an article in the Washington Post lamenting the loss of liberal arts education in the United States. However, instead of making a case for balanced education, which integrates various forms of creativity and critical thinking promoted by STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and by a liberal arts education, Zakaria misrepresents STEM education as primarily teaching technical skills and also throws in a few cliches about Asians. You […]
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11:26 AM | Video of a Fight Between Two Female Brown Anoles
Compared with our extensive knowledge of male-male interactions, we know very little about how females interact with one another. Adding to a growing set of observations, here is some video (taken by my field assistant and seasoned anole videographer Jon Suh) of two bead-tagged female brown anoles mid-battle. Both females are recent arrivals to this particular […]
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9:05 AM | Report on GUDMAP Outreach at ISN World Congress of Nephrology (ISN WCN)
Report on GUDMAP Outreach at ISN World Congress of Nephrology (ISN WCN) March 13-17, 2015 Cape Town, South Africa Author: Chris Armit Date: 23rd March 2015 Introduction The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) holds biennial meetings throughout the world, and this was the first ISN WCN to be held in Africa. There was attention brought […]
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9:00 AM | Antibiotic resistance
Ken and I just saw Michael Grazione's excellent, sobering film, Resistance, about the looming loss of antibiotics in the medicinal arsenal.  Bacteria that can make us very ill, and even kill us, are quickly, and unavoidably developing resistance to the chemicals that control them.  As Meryn McKenna writes in her excellent, also sobering piece, "Imaging the Post-Antibiotic Era", a world without antibiotics is going to look a lot like 1935; simple infections will become fatal once […]
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8:30 AM | Xilitolo contro la carie? L’effetto è tutto da dimostrare
Lo sostiene una revisione dei principali lavori della letteratura scientifica sul tema. Esistono infatti solo piccole evidenze a favore dei prodotti contenenti lo "zucchero del legno"
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7:30 AM | Wellcome Trust Research Round-up: 30.03.15
Our fortnightly round-up of news from the Wellcome Trust community… New insight into TB immune evasion A new version of a gene, that may help to explain why some people are more susceptible to TB than others, has been identified in a Wellcome Trust-funded study. Although TB infects an estimated two billion people worldwide, only […]
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7:30 AM | Ciencia hasta la tumba
La búsqueda de los restos de Cervantes ha devuelto a la actualidad la importancia de la antropología forense para desvelar los secretos de los huesos, sean los de una momia andaluza de la edad de Bronce, los de unos íberos masacrados o los de una joven princesa noruega enterrada en Castilla. Otras técnicas, como el carbono 14 han ayudado a datar a los amantes de Teruel, y el ADN ha confirmado la identidad de un corsario canario y del mismísimo Cristóbal […]
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7:00 AM | Is There Any Way To Reliably Count The Homeless?
To get federal funding or to determine if local programs to help the homeless are working, you need to know how many homeless people are in your area. But that's not an easy number to compute. In the US, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) sends "enumerators" into the streets to actually count the homeless in sample areas as a snapshot in time. London does something similar. Most other governments don't bother. The post Is There Any Way To Reliably Count The Homeless? […]
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7:00 AM | The secret signal in a peacock's tail
Peacocks use their tail feathers to emit a sound inaudible to humans.
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7:00 AM | The passenger pigeon
Cautionary tale of a lost species.
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7:00 AM | Top stories from our news blog
The most read articles from the Cosmos news blog over the past week.
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7:00 AM | How a fish slobbered its way to dry land
Mudskippers may help explain how land-based animals learned to eat.
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7:00 AM | Hobbit houses and the Moon trick the brain and eye
Science can't always explain how optical illusions work.
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7:00 AM | A better way to capture carbon
A cheaper and more efficient way to take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere has been found.
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6:00 AM | Photo 428 : Des chats mignons tout plein
No summary available for this post.
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5:24 AM | Plantwise initiative helping improve food security in Zambia
Ever since Lackson Njovu, a farmer in Rufunsa district, learnt how to deal with plant diseases and pests using the natural way, his harvest has improved. Mr Njovu now registers less losses and feeds more by identifying, preventing and curing plant health problems. On his five hectares farm east of the capital, Lusaka, where he […]
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2:41 AM | Swarm Sunday: 1/1/2015 – 3/28/2015
  Well, it’s that time of year again!  Swarms have already started popping up in the US, even though it’s still pretty early to have them.  Here’s the swarms that have been reported since the beginning of the year: USA: San Diego, CA Boynton Beach, FL Brandon, FL Fort Lauderdale, FL Brazil: Florianopolis, Santa Catarina […]
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