Posts

April 22, 2015

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12:26 PM | Video Tip of the Week: TargetMine, Data Warehouse for Drug Discovery
Browsing around genomic regions, layering on lots of associated data, and beginning to explore new data types I might come across are things that really fire up my brain. For me, visualization is key to forming new ideas about the relationships between genomic features and patterns of data. But frequently I want to take this […]
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12:15 PM | This Is How Anti-Vaxxers Sound to Normal People (video)
Even though there are thousands of studies proving the efficiency of vaccines and that there is no association found between MMR vaccine and autism, even among children at higher risk there are still people who believe in anti-vaccination and they are currently putting everyone's lives at risk. This humerous video shows you how anti-vaxxers sound to normal people (pro-vaxxers). 
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12:00 PM | Boys Will Be Boys… And Then Girls
Biology concepts – botany, monoecious, dichogamy, imperfect and perfect flowers, self-pollination, cross-pollination, self-incompatibility, heterostylyThis clip shows the mating of hermaphroditic leopard slugs. Each may provide male gametes for the other, or it may just go one way. They hang from a branch to do this, and the male reproductive organs spiral around one another. The trait has gone mad – in some species, the male organ has reached 92 cm long!There are a few ways for […]

Casimiro-Soriguer I, Buide ML & Narbona E (2013). The roles of female and hermaphroditic flowers in the gynodioecious-gynomonoecious Silene littorea: insights into the phenology of sex expression., Plant biology (Stuttgart, Germany), 15 (6) 941-7. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23174011

Pérez-Barrales, R., Vargas, P. & Arroyo, J. (2006). New evidence for the Darwinian hypothesis of heterostyly: breeding systems and pollinators in Narcissus sect. Apodanthi, New Phytologist, 171 (3) 553-567. DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2006.01819.x

Miller, J. & Diggle, P. (2003). Diversification of andromonoecy in Solanum section Lasiocarpa (Solanaceae): the roles of phenotypic plasticity and architecture, American Journal of Botany, 90 (5) 707-715. DOI: 10.3732/ajb.90.5.707

Citation
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11:56 AM | La patata dolce? Un ogm naturale
Nelle piante di patate dolce si trova dna di origine batterica, trasferito con un meccanismo simile a quello che i ricercatori usano per creare ogm. Che l’argomento del “naturale” aiuti a combattere i miti sugli ogm?
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11:13 AM | The Magic of Deadlines
Love ’em or hate ’em, deadlines play an important role in academia. As much as they sometimes scare me, I personally enjoy working to deadlines, particularly if they’re set by something or someone else (i.e. not self-imposed – I’m not strict … Continue reading →
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11:10 AM | Transcriptome and Genome of the Venus Flytrap
Darwin was fascinated by the unusual adaptations of carnivorous plants during his often frustrating studies of the evolution of flowering plants, which he referred to as an ‘abominable mystery’. Darwin’s treatise on insectivorous plants...
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10:48 AM | I piccoli sassi che hanno formato la Terra
Un video realizzato dai ricercatori della Lund University mostra come gli asteroidi (e quindi i pianeti) si sarebbero formati tramite l’accumulo di condruli, minuscole particelle di roccia sferiche, a causa della forza di gravità
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10:05 AM | Human brain dissection. I taught neuroanatomy to undergraduates...
Human brain dissection. I taught neuroanatomy to undergraduates for several years, and the highlight was always the human brain demonstration. For the students, to hold a brain in their hands always brought home the message that all of a person, their feelings, thoughts and relationships, their loves and losses, their sense of wonder and ability to learn and grow, the essence of their being, is contained within this lump of tissue. None of it is immaterial. There is really nothing like it.
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9:19 AM | Call for Frontiers Innovators
Frontiers meetings stimulate innovation and provocative discussion about the future of health, helping to shape the Wellcome Trust’s strategy. The first in this year’s Frontiers series – ‘One Science: Life at the Interface’ – will explore new opportunities for convergence between the health, life, engineering and physical sciences that underpin biomedical research. We’re keen to […]
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9:00 AM | Seattle's finest (thinkers, not coffee)
We're currently in Seattle, not blogging, but where I gave a presentation about genomic causation at the Institute for Systems Biology. I was hosted by Sui Huang and his group, and had many good conversations. This is a research institute where a lot of clever people are working hard, in various ways, to understand the causal complexity of genomic variation.Many are dedicated at present to a Big Data informatics or computational approach to causation, using GWAS or similar kinds of data. […]
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8:44 AM | This Earth Day, think agriculture
On April 22nd, 1970- the date of the first Earth Day– 20 million people marched for clean air, clean water and improved environmental protections. These actions were designed to draw public attention to the environmental agenda and move environmental issues up the priority list of policy makers. The question is: What will unite us this […]
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8:35 AM | DÍA DE LA TIERRA
CELEBRAMOS EL DÍA DE LA TIERRALA TIERRA CUMPLE 4.500 MILLONES DE AÑOSLa Tierra es tu hogar.Solo tienes 1 vida para disfrutarla en donde vives, la Tierra.Deja a tus hijos lo mismo que la Tierra te ha dado.¿Qué sería de ti sin la Tierra? ¿De dónde obtendrías lo necesario para mantenerte vivo?#nuestraTierraGoogle y su cuestionario del Día de la TierraYo soy el Dragón de Komodo y tu ¿qué […]
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7:14 AM | When Darwin Met Another Ape
When Darwin Met Another Ape: On March 28, 1838, Charles Darwin paid a visit to the London Zoo. At age 29, he was far from the scientific celebrity he would eventually become. It had only been two years since his return from his round-the-world voyage on the Beagle, and he was still methodically working his way through the heap of fossils and living specimens he had accumulated along the way. It would take more than two decades before he would present the world with his theory of evolution. In […]
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7:00 AM | The Secret Public Servant Who Turned A Freeway Sign Into Art
Richard Ankrom is more than just an artist. He's a guerrilla public servant. In 2001, he singlehandedly replaced a Los Angeles freeway sign with a near-exact replica that he'd made himself. Why? Because years before, the sign had made Richard miss his exit. The post The Secret Public Servant Who Turned A Freeway Sign Into Art appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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6:32 AM | Masters of Innovation
Hey there! Lately, my Marketing colleague – Jyotika has been sharing some amazing ads that belie human ingenuity and innovation. I thought I’ll share them with you because they segue quite nicely from my last post which was centered on a neat Innovation Challenge. Simply Sand-tacular  A little girl’s wish came true as a team of… Continue reading »
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6:18 AM | L’ennesima prova contro il legame tra vaccini e autismo
Anche nei bambini con sorelle o fratelli maggiori affetti da disturbi dello spettro autistico non c’è alcuna correlazione tra vaccino Mmr e insorgenza della malattia
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6:00 AM | Photo 451 : Un vampire bigarré
No summary available for this post.
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6:00 AM | Cento anni di armi chimiche: ecco le vittime italiane
Un secolo fa, sui campi di battaglia di Ypres, in Belgio, appariva per la prima volta una nuova terrificante arma: l'iprite. Nel 1943, in Italia, sarà responsabile del "disastro di Bari". Ricordiamo cosa avvenne
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5:06 AM | Who’s really pollen their weight: Bees, or Flies?
When it comes to pollination ecology research, bees are their own knees. Along with butterflies, birds, and bats, bees reign supreme as the queens of pollinator studies, with huge amounts of money and time spent each year trying to understand everything about their biology, from how they choose which flowers to visit, to the structure [...]
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5:00 AM | “Eric” the pliosaur was discovered by an opal miner in...
“Eric” the pliosaur was discovered by an opal miner in 1987. The Australian miner excavated the remains himself, destroying and missing many of the smaller bones. After a dealer bought the remains for $125,000 Australian ($230,000 US when adjusted for inflation), the dealer went bankrupt and put Eric up for auction. Jewelry makers almost bought the aquatic reptile to break up the skeleton and make jewelry, as the opal content alone was worth $25,000 Australian. But with the help of […]
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3:02 AM | Microbial Group Dynamics
Note: These are all fake group names. Viruses and tardigrades don’t have group names that I’ve ever heard of, and if anything, a group of bacteria would be a culture. The post Microbial Group Dynamics appeared first on Beatrice the Biologist.
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1:47 AM | Beating the bloodsuckers?
Last night I ran around my room fighting a fairly bloody battle - shoes may have been thrown. This was not a bizarre reaction to stress; my room was colonised by bloodthirsty ectoparasites intent on eating me alive. But how exactly do mosquitoes track us down - and what makes humans their meal of choice? […]

April 21, 2015

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11:46 PM | Growth of mining on land may promote invasions at sea
Ballast water taken in to keep ships stable could, when discharged elsewhere, release species that become invasive in their new homes.
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11:45 PM | Growth of mining on land may promote invasions at sea
Wild ThingsAnimals,Oceans by Sarah Zielinski 7:46pm, April 21, 2015 Northern Pacific seastars gang together off a pier in Australia. The species was transported to Australian waters in the ballast of ships. A new study finds that the growth of the Australian mining industry may help promote such invasions.Saspotato/Flickr (CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0)Some 90 percent of the world’s trade spends at […]
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11:12 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Predatory credit score-based insurance fees The achievement gap: whose problem is it? The Dangerous Myth of Appomattox The solution to Ghost Apartments is Obvious, and Not Done White womens feminisms still center around equality. Black womens feminisms demand justice Report … Continue reading →
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11:00 PM | Wolves Are Kinder, More Tolerant Than Dogs
The finding has animal experts puzzling over what led to domestication of man's best friend.
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9:39 PM | Only Three Wolves Remain on Michigan's Isle Royale
Since 2009 the wolves have been rapidly declining in numbers, dropping from 24 to just 3 in six years.
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9:34 PM | Breathless: How blood-oxygen levels regulate air intake
A UChicago team unravels the mysterious process of how the body detects oxygen levels in the blood to regulate breathing rates.
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7:43 PM | Mystery Seed of the Week 246
Our seeds today are not quite mature. I had to pick the pods early because the seeds shoot out when the pods are mature. Although they look like lima beans in size and shape, these seeds are from a tree. … Continue reading →
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7:30 PM | Publication Summary: Dark Field Microscopy Makes Nanoparticles Light Up
This post is part of our ongoing series of public-friendly summaries describing research articles that have been published by members of the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology. Katie Hurley and Nathan Klein, a doctoral mentor/undergraduate mentee team at the University of Minnesota, were co-first authors on this paper. Katie says, “In this post I want to point […]
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