Posts

October 23, 2014

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12:11 AM | Comet’s Mars Buzz - NASA Scientist’s ‘Need To...
Comet’s Mars Buzz - NASA Scientist’s ‘Need To Know’ NASA scientist Dr. Michelle L Thaller tells Space.com’s @MiriKramer what you need to know about comet Siding Spring’s fly-by, its implications for the Red Planet and how humans will be able to observe it. Full Coverage: http://goo.gl/0cnCEb By: Video From Space.

October 22, 2014

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11:22 PM | The Election of 1896 Explained If you are in a United States...
The Election of 1896 Explained If you are in a United States history course and you don’t know about this critical election between William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan then come test day, you best be staying home son. By: Keith Hughes.
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10:33 PM | Linear Momentum Paul Andersen explains how the linear momentum...
Linear Momentum Paul Andersen explains how the linear momentum is equal to the product of the mass of an object and the velocity of the center of mass. He uses video analysis software to calculate the velocity of an object and therefore the linear momentum of the object. By: Bozeman Science.
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9:43 PM | The Microwave: Where did it come from? Today, microwave ovens...
The Microwave: Where did it come from? Today, microwave ovens are a common sight in kitchens across the world — but who invented them? Tune in to learn how Percy Spencer accidentally struck upon the Stuff of Microwaving Genius. By: How Stuff Works.
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8:54 PM | The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology: Crash Course...
The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology: Crash Course World History №212 by thecrashcourse: In which John Green talks about the methods of writing history by looking at some of the ways that history has been written about the rise of the West. But first he has to tell you what the West is. And then he has to explain the Rise of the West. And then he gets down to talking about the different ways that historians and other academics have explained how the West became dominant in the […]
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8:39 PM | Top Notch Photorealistic Invertebrate Illustrations by Carim Nahaboo
London-based illustrator Carim Nahaboo knocked my socks off this afternoon with his fantastic invertebrate illustrations. At first glance, it would be easy to mistake many of his illustrations for photographs.  The level of […]
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8:06 PM | Ideas don’t just grow on trees
They come from underfoot, like weeds.
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8:05 PM | Heartland Heritage: A Pirate’s Life! In this video Aaron...
Heartland Heritage: A Pirate’s Life! In this video Aaron discusses why the wreck of the Queen Anne’s Revenge is so important for our understanding of a pirate’s life. Link: http://www.qaronline.org/ Welcome to Heartland Heritage, in this series Aaron Colgrove explores the archaeological and cultural heritage of the Mid West, the US and other parts of the world. By: Archaeosoup Productions.
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7:27 PM | Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014: The winners are…
  The winners of the fourth Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize were announced this evening at a ceremony held at Wellcome Trust HQ in London. With over 600 entries to choose from, picking a single winner in each category was no simple task… “Communicating with the public in getting their insight into the work you […]
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7:20 PM | Lounging Lion Pride Wins Wildlife Photo of the Year
Veteran photojournalist captures the fierce hunters in a quiet moment that harkens back to a bygone era for the big cats.
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7:16 PM | Artificially Designed There are not much naturally produced...
Artificially Designed There are not much naturally produced foods. If you plant it, is not natural. Artificial selection Man made propagation GMOs By: JOLULIPA.
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6:41 PM | US supported Japan’s Secret Nuclear Weapons Programs
I recently found a  post by Joseph Trento about the collaboration between the highest levels of government of Japan and the United States to allow Japan to develop nuclear weapons through the dual program of Atoms for Peace.  The post says: The United States deliberately allowed Japan access to the United States’ most secret nuclear weapons facilities […]
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6:27 PM | The Chemistry of Pizza Whether it’s a plain cheese, a deep-dish...
The Chemistry of Pizza Whether it’s a plain cheese, a deep-dish stacked with meats or a thin-crust veggie delight, there’s just something about pizza that makes it delicious. There’s a lot of chemistry that goes into everything from dough to sauce to toppings to, of course, cheese. There’s also a very specific chemical reaction at work on every single slice, no matter what toppings you choose. It’s called the Maillard Reaction, and it’s what causes the […]
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6:00 PM | Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
The drug, developed with the help of Yusuke Nakamura and his lab, inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types, including lung and breast.
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5:38 PM | Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do...
Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do non-human primates like chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys respond to inequity or unfairness the way humans do? Georgia State psychologist and neuroscientist, Sarah Brosnan is interested in finding out. Brosnan studies the behavior of primates to better understand how they make decisions and cooperate with one another. By: National Science Foundation.
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5:00 PM | Deinocheirus Exposed: Meet The Body Behind the Terrible Hand
For 50 years, the dinosaur was just a pair of arms. But what arms! Each was eight feet …
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5:00 PM | Science Snaps: peering inside an expanding lymph node
Our scientists have shown for the first time how lymph nodes swell during infection, producing some striking images along the way.
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5:00 PM | Humpback Dino Was Literally Unsinkable
A dinosaur nicknamed Horrible Hands turns out not to have been so horrible, but it sported a suite of unusual features including a humpback, super long arms and sink-proof legs.
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4:49 PM | Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for...
Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for the position of an object over time can be used to calculate the velocity and acceleration of the object. If a net force acts on a object it will experience an acceleration. By: Bozeman Science.
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4:41 PM | Nuclear heartburn: even IEA says solar could become world’s dominant energy source
Originally posted on GreenWorld:IEA projections for solar PV by region. Sending chills down the spine of nuclear and coal utility executives across the world, the International Energy Agency (IEA) yesterday released two reports that assert solar power could become the dominant source of global electricity production by mid-century. This is the same IEA that…
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4:31 PM | France and nuclear power: the end of the affair is coming?
Originally posted on nuclear-news:Is France’s Love Affair with Nuclear Over? Oil Price, By Chris Dalby | Sun, 19 October 2014  French President Francois Hollande has promised to limit the growth of the country’s nuclear power, many older reactors have been targeted for decommissioning, and Greenpeace and other environmental groups have been relentless in their anti-nuclear campaigning. But…
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4:27 PM | Aging reactors: a failure to plan that will haunt nuclear utilities
Originally posted on GreenWorld:Exelon’s aging GE Mark I reactors at Peach Bottom. Photo by cryptome.org One reason that giant nuclear utilities like Exelon, Entergy, Duke and others are so aggressively taking extraordinary steps to force ratepayers to keep their obsolete, aging reactors operating at any cost is that these utilities have failed to adequately…
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4:21 PM | Vermont Yankees Says Shutdown to Cost $1.24 Billion
By Michelle Mei 19 October 2014 by Pat Bradley at WAMC Northeast Public Radio Listen to the broadcast here: http://wamc.org/post/vermont-yankee-says-shutdown-cost-124-billion The Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant has released a new estimate of what it will cost to decommission the reactor, manage high-level radioactive waste and restore the plant site. The estimate of about $1. http://afscwm.org/2014/10/21/vermont-yankees-says-shutdown-cost-1-24-billion/ This […]
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4:00 PM | Imprinting, epigenetic markers and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)
Epigenetics refers to changes in gene regulation that are do not related to changes in the primary sequence of DNA. It can be reversible and heritable throughout cell division, and its regulation is characterized by several modifications, such as DNA methylation and post-translational changes in the histone proteins. In addition, ... The post Imprinting, epigenetic markers and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) appeared first on EpiBeat.
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3:11 PM | Post-doc and research assistant positions in Drosophila planar polarity
Two Wellcome Trust-funded positions are available for candidates with a background in cell and/or developmental biology to join an interdisciplinary team investigating cell signalling and coordinated cell polarisation using Drosophila epithelial development as a model system. The Strutt lab (http://www.shef.ac.uk/bms/research/strutt) studies cell signalling and coordinated cell polarisation in animal tissues via analysis of the “core” […]
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3:04 PM | Synchronizing mitochondrial metabolism
Mitochondria are fidgeters. That’s what researchers discovered in a recent study. The organelles undergo waves in ATP production. Furthermore, the mitochondria, like synchronized dancers, work in a coordinated fashion. A team at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research report in a paper just out in the journal Cell Reports that mitochondria in the […]
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3:03 PM | Biological Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
hemlock woolly adelgidThe hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), a native of Asia, is a <1 mm long reddish purple insect that lives within its own protective coating. White, woolly masses that shelter these sap-feeding insects can be found at the bases of hemlock needles along infested branches. The presence of these white sacs, which resemble tiny cotton balls, indicate that a tree is infested. The hemlock woolly adelgid is a threat to North American hemlock forests. As of 2007, 50% of […]
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2:42 PM | Il pericolo di giudicare gli altri dal loro aspetto
"Anche se ci piace pensare che i nostri giudizi e le nostre scelte siano razionali, imparziali, coerenti e basati unicamente su informazioni pertinenti, la verità è che sono spesso influenzati da fattori superficiali e irrilevanti", afferma Christopher Olivola della Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business di Pittsburgh, negli Stati Uniti, commentando la sua ultima ricerca. In […]
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2:25 PM | New Phylogeny for Amazonian Dactyloa Anoles: Multiple Evolution of Horns, Dewlap Color Evolution, New Divergence Time Estimates
In a fascinating new paper, Ivan Prates and colleagues report on a phylogenetic analysis of Amazonian Dactyloa clade anoles with implications for a number of important topics in anole evolution. The authors generated new mitochondrial and nuclear gene data for many Amazonian Dactyloa and combined those data with existing data from previous studies. Of particular note […]
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2:17 PM | Wildlife Photography of the Year 2014: gli scatti vincenti
Si stringono gli uni agli altri per superare il freddo della notte i babbuini gelada ritratti in questa foto premiata come “Winning Images” dal Wildlife Photography of the Year2014. A realizzarla il fotografo italiano Simone Sbaraglia, arrampicatosi su un’altura dei monti Simien, sull’altipiano etiopico, a 4500 metri di altitudine, dove questa specie di primati erbivori ha trovato rifugio. Il vincitore della 50esima edizione del contest di fotografia naturalistica […]
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