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April 12, 2014

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12:00 PM | April 12th: Sakurai’s Object
Podcaster: Rob Sparks, Dr. Ken Hinkle & Dr. Dick Joyce
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11:30 AM | Don’t Miss the Lunar Eclipse on April 14/15!
Do you live in North America, South America, Australia, or eastern Asia? Then you get to see a lunar eclipse on the night of April 14/15! And while North America is the best place to watch—we’ll get to see the whole event—the real action doesn’t begin until 05:58 UTC on the 15th, which is just before 02:00 EDT, so it’s a bit late. You might just want to stay up for it, though. A lunar eclipse is when the Moon slips into the shadow of the Earth and gets dark. Unlike […]
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11:00 AM | Cosmological Quests for the Next Decade
The inaugural cosmology conference in April 2014 will celebrate 40th anniversary of KASI. The workshop will cover recent progresses in observational and theoretical cosmology including the galaxies and large-scale structures, […]
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10:51 AM | Debt of Gratitude—
I owe a large debt of gratitude to the BALDSCIENTIST, professor Oné R. Pagán. He kindly acknowledged me in his new book, The First Brain  The Neuroscience of Planarians. It is published by Oxford University Press, 2014. All too often, it is hard to understand the meaning of gratitude. Thank you very much, Oné.  
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8:00 AM | The Last Word
April 7 – 11, 2014 This week we say a sad but temporary ciao to Sally and a delighted ecco! to Craig Childs, and no, I don’t have a clue what he’s doing in that photograph. Sports programs measuring themselves by winning instead of by kick-ass players who also know how to lose are, says […]
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7:11 AM | Millelight, l'app per il medico di famiglia
Basta una app scaricata sullo smartphone o sul tablet per poter consultare e aggiornare le informazioni di tutti i pazienti, in tempo reale, ovunque sia il medico o il pediatra. Si può grazie a Millelight, la nuova applicazione per Windows 8, sviluppata da Microsoft insieme a Millennium, azienda che fornisce soluzioni tecnologiche a migliaia di medici di medicina generale, che semplifica la gestione a domicilio del paziente. L’app offre vantaggi su due fronti, sia dal punto di […]
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5:36 AM | Mining in El Salvador: Can Corporate Behaviour be Changed?
Guest article by Vladimir Pacheco Central America remains a land of tremendous potential but persistent poverty. In vulnerable states recovering from civil strife and growing inequality, foreign corporate investment has additional obligations to ensure community consent through patient engagement. In this guest article, Vladimir Pacheco, a social scientist who has worked on mining and human…
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5:00 AM | The Impact of Feedback on Star and Galaxy Formation
After several decades of theoretical developments and spectacular observations of star formation sites and star forming galaxies, our understanding of star formation in the universe has profoundly evolved. Designing a […]
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4:34 AM | Ask Ethan #32: Are our students doomed to an inferior education? (Synopsis)
“Quite frankly, teachers are the only profession that teach our children.”  -Dan Quayle It wasn’t that long ago that I myself was a student, and of course over the past decade-and-a-half I’ve been very heavily involved in education — both formally and informally — at a huge variety of levels. And over time, education methods…
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4:00 AM | Pluto May Have Deep Seas and Ancient Tectonic Faults
New modeling of the Pluto-Charon system give good reasons to suspect that the surface of Pluto will be riddled with faults caused in part from a liquid ocean that once lie hidden under the icy surface.
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1:19 AM | NASA Releases Over 1000 of Their Computer Software Codes Hoping to Spark Innovation
Originally posted on Higher Learning:Yesterday (4/10/14), NASA officially launched their Tech Tansfer program, making the computer codes for over 1000 different NASA programs available to the public. NASA published the codes in an open-access software catalog, in the hopes that independent coders or software designers will provide innovations to the NSA. Front cover of…
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12:16 AM | Cosmic Queries: A Stellar Sampling
This week’s show is bursting with conspiracy theories and strange hypotheses, but that doesn’t stop your own personal astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson from dropping some serious science.

April 11, 2014

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10:47 PM | The substance, or lack thereof, of NASA’s ban on Russian cooperation
The news last week that NASA was cutting off cooperation with the Russian government—with the very large exception of International Space Station (ISS) operations—attracted a lot of attention in the space industry and the general public, which continues to the present. “NASA is cutting ties with Russia. But it’s not that simple,” reads the headline [...]
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10:00 PM | Five Tips to Avoid Legal Pitfalls on Your Creative Journey by William Bowen.
William is one of the IP litigators at our firm and he wrote this great article for anyone in a creative field on how to protect their rights.  It is longer than my usual posts, but it is full of valuable information.  As an intellectual property attorney, people often ask me what they should do … Continue reading →
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9:45 PM | Epic Space Photos of the Week (April 5-11)
Enjoy some of the most inspiring, beautiful and down-right stunning photos from our adventures in space this past week.
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8:02 PM | Ancient Daddy Longlegs Had Extra Set of Eyes
The 305-million-year-old fossil may reveal secrets about the evolution of spider eyes, new study says.
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7:57 PM | Gift to the Maasai Mara, a Male Elephant is Born
By Joyce Poole Petter Granli and I left Cottars 1920s Safari Camp on the border of the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, the northern extension of the great Serengeti-Mara ecosystem. We were heading toward the Sand River crossing, where elephants had been seen the evening before. The route was not direct, as tracks twisted and…
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7:31 PM | Intro Astronomy Class 9: Titan, Uranus and Neptune Systems
Examine Saturn's moon Titan and explore the Uranian and Neptunian systems in this video of class 9 of Bruce Betts' Introduction to Planetary Science and Astronomy class.
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7:28 PM | Intro Astronomy 2014. Class 8: Icy Galilean Satellites, Saturn System
Explore the icy moons of the Jupiter System and tour the Saturnian system in this video of class 8 of Bruce Betts' Introduction to Planetary Science and Astronomy class.
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7:28 PM | Every devil I meet becomes a friend of mine
It’s not the Devil’s land, you know it’s not that kind Every devil I meet becomes a friend of mine Every devil I meet is an angel in disguise —”Jonas and Ezekiel“, The Indigo Girls The American West is rife with hellish nomenclature. Settlers pushing west from the organized United States into the Plains and […]
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5:25 PM | Wild Cats in San Francisco’s Backyard
Every year at BioBlitz, National Geographic and the U.S. National Park Service rally to get people young and old to explore the wild spaces around them during a whirlwind 24-hour search to identify every species they can find. In advance of our next event in Golden Gate National Recreation Area, March 28-29, 2014, we’re already…
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5:08 PM | Curiosity update: Initial reconnaissance of the Kimberley, sols 585-595
Curiosity has been busy performing a survey of the Kimberley, walking the length of the outcrop and taking enormous quantities of photos. The team is now ready to go in for a closer look, and maybe even to drill.
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5:00 PM | Dying in a Living Room: The Illegal Live Cheetah Trade
Wildlife trafficking has become one of the major conservation issues of our time and the sinister illegal trade in cheetahs is increasingly coming to the attention of conservationists. Unlike leopards, the main trade in cheetahs is not a consequence of the desire for beautiful spotted skins to decorate the house, nor is it a response…
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4:30 PM | Cherry Blossom Grown from Space Seeds a bit Weird
A cosmic mystery is uniting monks and scientists in Japan after a cherry tree grown from a seed that orbited the Earth for eight months bloomed years earlier than expected -- and with very surprising flowers.
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4:00 PM | Missed Me By That Much!
Ok, after watching this video, this has to be the luckiest guy in the world for two reasons. 1.  He’s the first person to catch a flamed out meteorite in mid-air barely missing him; and 2. he’s the first person to catch a flamed out meteorite in mid-air barely missing him. The lucky Norwegian skydiver … Continue reading →
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3:26 PM | The Perils of the Skeptic Journalist
Being a writer these days is fraught with peril. Everything you write goes out into the wild, potentially viewable by millions of people. Usually not, but it can happen. And it may not happen today, or tomorrow … but those words are out there, and someone may stumble on them a year from now, or more. That’s an abyss that can be hard to face. As someone who’s been writing for a living for a while now, I’ve stood at that edge long enough to be familiar with it, if not […]
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2:11 PM | Tamiflu: il farmaco anti-aviaria è inutile
Il Tamiflu sembrava il farmaco delle meraviglie. Non solo perché era l'unico antivirale in grado di combattere l'influenza aviaria e la cosiddetta suina. Ma anche, e soprattutto, per il giro di affari che ha garantito negli ultimi anni all'azienda produttrice, la Roche: solo nel 2009 parliamo di circa 2,64 miliardi di euro e di oltre 50 milioni di persone trattate col farmaco in tutto il mondo. Peccato però che oggi c'è chi dice che potrebbe essere completamente inutile. A […]
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2:04 PM | Una vagina biotech
Si chiama sindrome di Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser ed è una rara condizione, congenita, per cui le donne che ne sono affette hanno malformazioni e sviluppo alterato del proprio apparato riproduttivo, compresa l’assenza del canale vaginale. Colpisce circa una persona su 5mila e, oltre a rendere impossibili mestruazioni e penetrazione, la malattia ha un grande impatto sulla psicologia di chi ne è affetta. Accanto alle limitate terapie oggi disponibili per ristabilire il […]
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12:06 PM | April 11th: Space Politics, Skydiving Meteor, and Enceladus Ocean
Podcaster: Host: Nicole Gugliucci ; Guests: Morgan Rehnberg, Scott Lewis, Nancy Atkinson, Dave Dickinson
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11:45 AM | The Beauty of the Mundane
45 million light years away, toward the constellation of Ursa Major, sits a rather unremarkable galaxy. It is not undergoing huge bursts of star formation. It is not blasting out radiation from its core. It isn’t twisted into bizarre shapes by the gravitational influence of a nearby passing galaxy, nor actively eating any smaller galaxies, nor swaddled in thick layers of dust. It just is, sitting there, being a spiral galaxy. And that’s what makes it so stunningly gorgeous. That […]
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