Posts

April 07, 2015

+
9:40 PM | An ‘apple a day’ keeps the prescription medications away?
Last week, a research article titled “Association between apple consumption and physician visits: appealing the conventional wisdom than an apple a day keeps the doctor away” was published online in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
9:25 PM | Differences in neural activity change learning rate
Why do some people learn a new skill right away, while others only gradually improve? Whatever else may be different about their lives, something must be happening in their brains that captures this variation. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
7:07 PM | Mortality and blood pressure directly linked to relationship quality
While other studies have shown that stress and negative marital quality can influence mortality and blood pressure, there has not been research that discussed how it might affect married couples over time. Using systolic blood pressure as a gauge, researchers assessed whether an individual's blood pressure is influenced by their own as well as their partner's reports of chronic stress and whether there are gender differences in these patterns. Subject:  Brain […]
+
7:03 PM | Emoticons and symbols aren’t ruining language – they’re revolutionizing it
In many casual discussions of language and the internet, it’s not uncommon to hear about how such “textspeak ruins language” – how technology has made everybody lazy with their speech and writing. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
6:34 PM | New tool to diagnose ebola uncovers surprises
Abdominal pain, fever and unexplained bleeding – which are commonly believed to indicate infection with the Ebola virus — are not significantly predictive of the disease, according to the results of a study examining a new Ebola Prediction Score published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine (“Derivation and Internal Validation of the Ebola Prediction Score for Risk Stratification of Patients with Suspected Ebola Virus Disease”). Subject:  […]
+
6:29 PM | Astronauts Grow a Water Bubble in Space
During Expedition 40 in the summer of 2014, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson and Reid Wiseman — along with European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst — explored the phenomenon of water surface tension in microgravity on the International Space Station. The crew "submerged" a sealed GoPro camera into a floating ball of water the size of a softball and recorded the activity with a 3-D camera. (Video: NASA)
+
6:24 PM | Defect found in pancreatic cells could lead to new diabetes treatment
A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers. The CUMC team found that ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) calcium channels in insulin-producing cells play an important and previously underappreciated role in glucose balance. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
6:16 PM | Carbon nanotube computing?
Single-walled carbon nanotube composites show great promise for many things—including use as a material in “unconventional” computing. As we approach the miniaturization limits of conventional electronics, alternatives to silicon-based transistors—the building blocks of the multitude of electronic devices we’ve come to rely on—are being hotly pursued. Subject:  Technology
+
5:39 PM | World’s largest asteroid impact site could be in Australia
Not long ago, asteroid impacts weren’t considered as a significant factor in the evolution of Earth. Following the Late Heavy Bombardment, which pummelled the inner solar system around 3.8 billion to 3.9 billion years ago, asteroid impacts were generally regarded as minor events. Subject:  Earth Science

April 06, 2015

+
10:16 PM | Computers that mimic the function of the brain
Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It's not a Mac or a PC; it's the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities. Subject:  Computer Science
+
9:08 PM | Exercise could save your life
Physical activity that makes you puff and sweat is key to avoiding an early death, a large Australian study of middle-aged and older adults has found. The researchers followed 204,542 people for more than six years, and compared those who engaged in only moderate activity (such as gentle swimming, social tennis, or household chores) with those who included at least some vigorous activity (such as jogging, aerobics or competitive tennis). Subject:  Health & […]
+
8:35 PM | Facebook use linked to depressive symptoms
The social media site, Facebook, can be an effective tool for connecting with new and old friends. However, some users may find themselves spending quite a bit of time viewing Facebook and may inevitably begin comparing what's happening in their lives to the activities and accomplishments of their friends. Subject:  Computer Science
+
8:32 PM | How do you feel? Video of your face may tell all
Rice University technique compensates for skin tone, light, movement to monitor vital signs. Rice University researchers are developing a highly accurate, touch-free system that uses a video camera to monitor patients’ vital signs just by looking at their faces. The technique isn’t new, but engineering researchers in Rice’s Scalable Health Initiative are making it work under conditions that have so far stumped earlier systems. Subject:  Brain […]
+
8:26 PM | Brain activity boosts processes that promote neural connections
Brain activity affects the way the developing brain connects neurons and a study by researchers at the School of Medicine on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado suggests a new model for understanding that process. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
2:58 PM | A dark night is good for your health
Today most people do not get enough sleep. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has called insufficient sleep an epidemic. While we are finally paying attention to the importance of sleep, the need for dark is still mostly ignored. That’s right. Dark. Your body needs it too. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
2:48 PM | Restart of the Large Hadron Collider
Earlier today, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator began its second act. After two years of upgrades and repairs, proton beams once again circulated around the Large Hadron Collider, located at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. With the collider back in action, the more than 1,700 U.S. scientists who work on LHC experiments are prepared to join thousands of their international colleagues to study the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved in the […]

April 05, 2015

+
3:55 PM | Carbon's importance to ocean life's survival 252 million years ago
A new study led by scientists with The University of Texas at Arlington demonstrates for the first time how elemental carbon became an important construction material of some forms of ocean life after one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of Earth more than 252 million years ago. Subject:  Biology & Aging

April 04, 2015

+
9:00 PM | Brain organization allows learning without forgetting
New research suggests that when brains are organized into modules they are better at learning new information without forgetting old knowledge. The findings--published this week in PLOS Computational Biology -- not only shed light on the evolution of intelligence in natural animals, but will also accelerate attempts to create artificial intelligence (AI). Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
4:04 PM | Frustrated magnets -- new experiment reveals clues to their discontent
An experiment conducted by Princeton researchers has revealed an unlikely behavior in a class of materials called frustrated magnets, addressing a long-debated question about the nature of these discontented quantum materials. The work represents a surprising discovery that down the road may suggest new research directions for advanced electronics. Published this week in the journal Science, the study also someday may help clarify the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity, […]
+
3:53 PM | That’s you all over…
An interesting study at Vanderbilt University (something not quite right about the brain picture on that page) suggests that consciousness is not narrowly localised within small regions of the cortex, but occurs when lots of connections to all regions are active. This is potentially of considerable significance, but some caution is appropriate. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
3:29 PM | Bill Gates: The next outbreak? We’re not ready
In 2014, the world avoided a horrific global outbreak of Ebola, thanks to thousands of selfless health workers — plus, frankly, thanks to some very good luck. In hindsight, we know what we should have done better. So, now's the time, Bill Gates suggests, to put all our good ideas into practice, from scenario planning to vaccine research to health worker training. As he says, "There's no need to panic ... but we need to get going."

April 03, 2015

+
6:26 PM | How our emotions transform mundane events into strong memories
Human beings are information seekers. We are constantly taking in details – big and small – from our environment. But the majority of the stuff we encounter in a given day we rarely need to remember. For instance, what are the chances that you need to remember where you ate lunch with a friend last Wednesday? But what if later on you learned that there was something important to remember about that lunch? The brain has a remarkable ability to store information that seems […]
+
6:12 PM | Camera chip provides superfine 3-D resolution
Imagine you need to have an almost exact copy of an object. Now imagine that you can just pull your smartphone out of your pocket, take a snapshot with its integrated 3-D imager, send it to your 3-D printer, and within minutes you have reproduced a replica accurate to within microns of the original object. This feat may soon be possible because of a tiny new, tiny high-resolution 3-D imager developed at Caltech. Subject:  Technology
+
5:27 PM | Cancer genes turned off in deadly brain cancer
Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified a small RNA molecule called miR-182 that can suppress cancer-causing genes in mice with glioblastoma mulitforme (GBM), a deadly and incurable type of brain tumor. While standard chemotherapy drugs damage DNA to stop cancer cells from reproducing, the new method stops the source that creates those cancer cells: genes that are overexpressing certain proteins. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
4:05 PM | Possible progress against Parkinson's and good news for stem cell therapies
Brazilian researchers at D'OR Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) have taken what they describe as an important step toward using the implantation of stem cell-generated neurons as a treatment for Parkinson's disease. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
1:41 AM | MRI tuned to detect cancer cells
Preliminary study in lab-grown cells raises possibility of cancer diagnosis without biopsies. Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous […]

April 02, 2015

+
11:52 PM | Darwin’s finches highlight the unity of all life
When Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos Islands in October 1835, he and his ship-mates on board HMS Beagle collected specimens of birds, including finches and mockingbirds, from various islands of the archipelago. Subject:  Evolution
+
11:41 PM | Supernova 'crime scene,' shows a single white dwarf to blame
Using archival data from the Japan-led Suzaku X-ray satellite, astronomers have determined the pre-explosion mass of a white dwarf star that blew up thousands of years ago. The measurement strongly suggests the explosion involved only a single white dwarf, ruling out a well-established alternative scenario involving a pair of merging white dwarfs. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
6:35 PM | Vehicle communication to prevent traffic congestion
Computational framework for optimizing traffic flow could be the beginning of a road revolution. Subject:  Technology
+
6:27 PM | Black hole 'information loss paradox' may not exist
Shred a document, and you can piece it back together. Burn a book, and you could theoretically do the same. But send information into a black hole, and it's lost forever. That's what some physicists have argued for years: That black holes are the ultimate vaults, entities that suck in information and then evaporate without leaving behind any clues as to what they once contained. But new research shows that this perspective may not be correct. Subject:  […]
12345678
229 Results