Posts

November 14, 2014

+
3:40 PM | Can You Erase Bad Memories?
What if you could delete specific memories?
+
3:35 PM | Scientists uncover vast numbers of DNA 'blind spots' that may hide cancer-causing mistakes
Cancer Research UK scientists have found more than 400 'blind spots' in DNA which could hide cancer-causing gene faults, according to research published today (Friday) in Cancer Research. The researchers found hidden faults in areas that are tricky for gene-reading technology to decode. This technique, which unravels cancer's genetic blueprint, is an important part of the research that scientists carry out to understand more about cancer's biology. Subject:  […]
+
3:32 PM | Forming the early solar system
Infant planetary systems are usually nothing more than swirling disks of gas and dust. Over the course of a few million years, this gas gets sucked into the center of the disk to build a star, while the remaining dust accumulates into larger and larger chunks—the building blocks for terrestrial planets. Astronomers have observed this protoplanetary disk evolution throughout our galaxy—a process that our own solar system underwent early in its history. However, the […]
+
3:27 PM | I Review "The Peripheral" by William Gibson at Strange Horizons
So after four years of radio silence on the fiction front, William Gibson came out with a new SF novel, The Peripheral. I couldn't help but get in on that action, by which I mean, I reviewed it for Strange Horizons.A quick plug: Strange Horizons is having a fundraiser drive right now. If you've liked my reviews, other people's reviews, other people's short stories and poetry--then please consider tossing some change into the jar.
+
3:21 PM | Why is a piece of Australia under Vanuatu?
Researchers from James Cook University have found a fragment of Australia beneath Vanuatu – and it may cause a rethink on how continents are built. Geologists thought the volcanic Vanuatu islands, about 2200km east of Townsville, were isolated from continental influences. But now research by a JCU team suggests the ‘geological basement’ of Vanuatu contains ancient material from northern Australia. Subject:  Earth Science
+
3:21 PM | I'm Back (Soon)
So it turns out I have a lot of thoughts about a bunch of media, and I want to come back to writing about these things!So I'll be back soon. But I'm also going to do a bit of an overhaul--I need a new name, I may move this to my own server, things like that. So watch this space, if only for a redirect.(But I didn't come back just to say this. I wrote a new review! It's live! Link forthcoming!)

November 13, 2014

+
10:03 PM | New dark matter experiments prepare to hunt the unknown
In support of three new experiments, MIT's Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano will answer questions about dark matter research in a live Google Hangout on November 20. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
9:58 PM | Is there organic matter on Mars?
Chloromethane discovered on the “Red Planet” possibly comes from the Martian soil – meteorites probably provided its carbon and hydrogen. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
9:52 PM | New clue into how anesthesia works
Anesthesia, long considered a blessing to patients and surgeons, has been a mystery for much of its 160-plus-year history in the operating room. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
4:43 PM | Mars, too, has macroweather
Weather, which changes day-to-day due to constant fluctuations in the atmosphere, and climate, which varies over decades, are familiar. More recently, a third regime, called "macroweather," has been used to describe the relatively stable regime between weather and climate. A new study by researchers at McGill University and UCL finds that this same three-part pattern applies to atmospheric conditions on Mars. The results, published in Geophysical Research Letters, also show that the […]
+
4:38 PM | Liver and brain communicate to regulate appetite
The liver stores excess glucose, sugar, in the form of glycogen—chains of glucose—which is later released to cover body energy requirements. Diabetic patients do not accumulate glucose well in the liver and this is one of the reasons why they suffer from hyperglycemia, that is to say, their blood sugar levels are too high. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
3:34 PM | Atomic timekeeping, on the go
What time is it? The answer, no matter what your initial reference may be — a wristwatch, a smartphone, or an alarm clock — will always trace back to the atomic clock. Subject:  Technology
+
6:21 AM | Personalized genetic test accurately predicts prostate cancer recurrence risk
Prostate cancer researchers have developed a genetic test to identify which men are at highest risk for their prostate cancer to come back after localized treatment with surgery or radiotherapy. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
6:13 AM | ‘Frankenstein’ DNA mystery solved
A team of laboratory researchers from Melbourne and Sydney have pieced together a long-held biological mystery, articulating the sequence of events that explains how grossly enlarged DNA molecules grow like Frankenstein’s monster and drive some cancers. Subject:  Genetics
+
1:51 AM | Toward supercapacitor-powered cars
A car powered by its own body panels could soon be driving on our roads after a breakthrough in nanotechnology research by a QUT team. Researchers have developed lightweight "supercapacitors" that can be combined with regular batteries to dramatically boost the power of an electric car. Subject:  Technology

November 12, 2014

+
11:15 PM | Large human brains may be due to newly identified protein
A protein that may partly explain why human brains are larger than those of other animals has been identified by scientists from two stem-cell labs at UC San Francisco, in research published in the November 13, 2014 issue of Nature. Key experiments by the UCSF researchers revealed that the protein, called PDGFD, is made in growing brains of humans, but not in mice, and appears necessary for normal proliferation of human brain stem cells growing in a lab dish. Subject:  […]
+
9:22 PM | Moving cameras talk to each other to identify, track pedestrians
It's not uncommon to see cameras mounted on store ceilings, propped up in public places or placed inside subways, buses and even on the dashboards of cars. Cameras record our world down to the second. This can be a powerful surveillance tool on the roads and in buildings, but it's surprisingly hard to sift through vast amounts of visual data to find pertinent information - namely, making a split-second identification and understanding a person's actions and behaviors as recorded […]
+
9:19 PM | A piece of the quantum puzzle
While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral fellow Pedram Roushan and several colleagues have been exploring qubits (quantum bits) for quantum simulation on a smaller scale. Their research appears in the current edition of the journal Nature. Subject:  Technology
+
9:14 PM | Can You Boost Your Creativity?
In this video we learn how attention and focus affects creative thinking.
+
9:09 PM | Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world
Driving to work becomes routine--but could you drive the entire way in reverse gear? Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
8:15 PM | Evolution software looks beyond the branches
The tree has been an effective model of evolution for 150 years, but a Rice Univ. computer scientist believes it’s far too simple to illustrate the breadth of current knowledge. Subject:  Evolution
+
8:11 PM | Philae reports from the surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
November 12, 2014 goes down in history. On this Wednesday, an unmanned probe landed on a comet nucleus for the first time ever. Philae is to remain there as a permanent research station to collect data and take measurements for at least 60 hours. On its way to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Philae followed a precisely defined choreography. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
7:57 PM | Virtual reality helps people to comfort and accept themselves
Dr Caroline Falconer, first author from UCL Clinical Educational & Health Psychology, said: "Women who experienced a first person perspective through the eyes of the virtual child were soothed - they felt safe and content and had increased self-compassion and a lower level of self-criticism. For these women, we created a unique situation where they can have a kind and reassuring word with themselves. Subject:  Technology
+
7:51 PM | Hope for those with social anxiety disorder
Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis, is that it's not necessarily true from the point of view of their friends. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
1:09 AM | Is sleep-learning possible?
New Weizmann Institute research may bring the idea of sleep learning one step closer to reality. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
12:25 AM | Sensing a purpose in life can make you live longer
A UCL-led study of 9,050 English people with an average age of 65 found that the people with the greatest wellbeing were 30% less likely to die during the average eight and a half year follow-up period than those with the least wellbeing. Subject:  Biology & Aging

November 11, 2014

+
8:09 PM | A billion holes can make a battery
Researchers at the University of Maryland have invented a single tiny structure that includes all the components of a battery that they say could bring about the ultimate miniaturization of energy storage components. Subject:  Technology
+
8:01 PM | Progress in bipolar disorder
Several lines of research have opened exciting new frontiers in scientific understanding and clinical management of bipolar disorder. Recent advances in bipolar disease research are described in this month's special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
5:23 PM | Google signs 60-year lease on NASA airfield and hangars
Google has sealed a deal to lease NASA's Moffett Airfield for the next 60 years after beginning negotiations for the land back in February. Subject:  Technology
+
5:04 PM | Nations failing to save earth’s wildlife
The world can dramatically improve the rate at which it rescues imperilled species if it starts choosing the land set aside as protected areas more wisely, international scientists say. New research shows that by choosing the least valuable lands as protected areas, the world is doing a poor job of protecting its threatened birds, mammals and amphibians. The study also reveals that with a little compromise, nations can save five times more wildlife at 1.5 times the cost of the […]
12345678
219 Results