Posts

October 19, 2014

+
3:53 PM | Cleft palate mutation identified
Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate – conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy – and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Their findings were presented today at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Subject:  Genetics

October 18, 2014

+
10:59 PM | The Virtual Interview: Edward Snowden
The New Yorker Festival presents Edward Snowden in conversation with Jane Mayer.
+
10:47 PM | iPhones for eye health
Smartphone technology is a widely available resource which may also be a portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, according to results of a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Researchers from the Ross Eye Institute at the University at Buffalo-SUNY are successfully using an iPhone® application as an inexpensive, portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, including in […]
+
10:40 PM | Birth season affects your mood in later life
New research shows that the season you are born has a significant impact on your risk of developing mood disorders. People born at certain times of year may have a greater chance of developing certain types of affective temperaments, which in turn can lead to mood disorders (affective disorders). This work is being presented at the European College of CNP Congress in Berlin. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
9:07 PM | Red is the color of love for monkeys, too
Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions. Subject:  Animal Research
+
3:38 PM | Journey to the center of the Earth
A UCSB geochemist uses helium and lead isotopes to gain insight into the makeup of the planet’s deep interior. A UC Santa Barbara geochemist studying Samoan volcanoes has found evidence of the planet’s early formation still trapped inside the Earth. Known as hotspots, volcanic island chains such as Samoa can ancient primordial signatures from the early solar system that have somehow survived billions of years. Subject:  Earth Science
+
3:34 PM | Could reading glasses soon be a thing of the past?
A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. A corneal inlay device currently undergoing clinical review in the United States improved near vision well enough for 80 percent of the participating patients to read a newspaper without disturbing […]

October 17, 2014

+
6:54 PM | Are coma patients truly brain-dead?
This study uncovers hidden signatures of brain networks that could support consciousness in patients who are unresponsive and seemingly vegetative, but who demonstrate signs of covert awareness. University of Cambridge researchers Dr Srivas Chennu, Dr Tristan Bekinschtein and their collaborators employ the science of networks to characterise the brain networks that support human consciousness and how they are affected in pathological states of low awareness, like the vegetative […]
+
6:47 PM | Hint of dark matter found?
Space sci­en­tists have measured a cu­ri­ous sig­nal that they say might come from the mys­te­ri­ous “dark mat­ter,” an in­vis­i­ble sub­stance de­tected so far only through its gra­vity. The re­search­ers at the Uni­vers­ity of Leices­ter in the U.K. re­ported what seems to be a sig­na­ture of par­t­i­cles thought to pos­sibly make up dark mat­ter, called […]
+
4:46 PM | Cadavers still make the best anatomy teachers
Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. Cary Roseth, associate professor of educational psychology at Michigan State University, said the study suggests cadaver-based instruction should continue in undergraduate human anatomy, a gateway course to medical school, nursing and other health and medical […]
+
4:34 PM | Getting to know super-Earths
"If you have a coin and flip it just once, what does that tell you about the odds of heads versus tails?" asks Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech. "It tells you almost nothing. It's the same with planetary systems," she says. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
4:21 PM | New documentary on Snowden released
Award-winning documentarian Laura Poitras has just released her new film Citizenfour about Edward Snowden. Subject:  Technology
+
4:12 PM | High-speed evolution in the lab
DNA analysis has become increasingly efficient and cost-effective since the human genome was first fully sequenced in the year 2001. Sequencing a complete genome, however, still costs around US$1,000. Sequencing the genetic code of hundreds of individuals would therefore be very expensive and time-consuming. In particular for non-human studies, researchers very quickly hit the limit of financial feasibility. Sequencing Groups Instead of Individuals Subject:  […]
+
4:03 PM | Sperm wars
Why do male animals need millions of sperms every day in order to reproduce? And why are there two sexes anyway? Subject:  Biology & Aging
+
3:59 PM | How the brain leads us to believe we have sharp vision
We assume that we can see the world around us in sharp detail. In fact, our eyes can only process a fraction of our surroundings precisely. In a series of experiments, psychologists at Bielefeld University have been investigating how the brain fools us into believing that we see in sharp detail. The results have been published in the scientific magazine Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. Its central finding is that our nervous system uses past visual experiences to predict […]
+
2:16 PM | The exercise cost of soda and juice
When people think about sugar calories in terms of physical activity, they choose well. What if nutrition labels told people exactly what calories meant, in practical terms? A bottle of Coke could dole out specific exercise requirements. The calories herein, it might say, are the equivalent of a 50-minute jog. The decision to drink the Coke then becomes, would you rather spend the evening on a treadmill, or just not drink the soda? Subject:  Health & Medicine […]

October 16, 2014

+
9:53 PM | The philosophy of genocide
I have recently hosted one of my regular dinner & philosophy discussions in Manhattan [1], and this time we chose the topic of genocide. More specifically, we pored over an as yet unpublished paper by NYU philosopher Paul Boghossian on “The concept of genocide” [2]. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
6:26 PM | 3D Printed IRON MAN Child Prosthetic Hand
How can we help a child that faces everyday challenges with a disability? One way is to give them the most awesome prosthetic hand, and raise their self esteem to Super Hero Levels. The vision was to create a hand so that a child can have something that solves a mechanical challenge, is affordable, and mostly Looks Awesome! Design goals: 1) It had to look awesome 2) It had to perform awesome 3) Hide all the strings and mechanics, so nothing distracts from the magic.
+
6:14 PM | First demonstration of artificial intelligence on a quantum computer
A Chinese team of physicists have trained a quantum computer to recognise handwritten characters; the first demonstration of “quantum artificial intelligence." Physicists have long claimed that quantum computers have the potential to dramatically outperform the most powerful conventional processors. The secret sauce at work here is the strange quantum phenomenon of superposition, where a quantum object can exist in two states at the same time. Subject:  […]
+
5:45 PM | NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years
A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium. Using a tree-ring-based drought record from the years 1000 to 2005 and modern records, scientists from NASA and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory found the 1934 drought was 30 percent more severe than the runner-up drought (in 1580) and extended across 71.6 percent of western North America. For […]
+
2:48 PM | A simple and versatile way to build 3-dimensional materials of the future
Researchers in Japan have developed a novel yet simple technique, called "diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly," to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors. Their study was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. Subject:  Technology
+
2:41 PM | Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy?
Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many—even those with seizure disorders—may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), reports that 76% of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65% of patients with epilepsy. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
2:15 PM | Adenosine can melt 'love handles'
The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease. For this reason, many people dream of an efficient method for losing weight. An international team of researchers led by Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the University Hospital Bonn, have now come one step closer to this goal. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
2:09 PM | Protons are forever?
The proton has never been observed to decay into other particles. So it is possible that it is an absolutely stable particle and will never decay. However, there are some grand unified theories that argue that the proton does decay and physicists have been carrying out experiments to detect them decaying. The catch is that these theories predict an extremely long lifetime for the proton, greater than 1031years! How does one do such an experiment? Subject:  […]

October 15, 2014

+
10:36 PM | Lockheed Martin announces nuclear fusion energy breakthrough
Lockheed Martin Corp said on Wednesday it had made a technological breakthrough in developing a power source based on nuclear fusion, and the first reactors, small enough to fit on the back of a truck, could be ready for use in a decade. Tom McGuire, who heads the project, said he and a small team had been working on fusion energy at Lockheed's secretive Skunk Works for about four years, but were now going public to find potential partners in industry and government for their work. […]
+
6:36 PM | Change your walking style, change your mood
Our mood can affect how we walk — slump-shouldered if we're sad, bouncing along if we're happy. Now researchers have shown it works the other way too — making people imitate a happy or sad way of walking actually affects their mood. Subjects who were prompted to walk in a more depressed style, with less arm movement and their shoulders rolled forward, experienced worse moods than those who were induced to walk in a happier style, according to the study published in the […]
+
6:32 PM | Weather history time machine
During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can't explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting. Subject:  Earth Science
+
6:27 PM | Blinded by science
Do you believe in science? Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn't tell you much. Subject:  Technology
+
5:13 PM | How AI research is bringing game characters to life
In an era of crowd-sourced machine intelligence, games may be about to do what authors have been trying to do for centuries. The ambition to create “real”, believable characters has been a cornerstone of literature since the 19th century. The Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin praised Fyodor Dostoyevsky for his ability to give each of his protagonists their own sets of beliefs, “as if the character were not an object of authorial discourse, but rather a fully valid, […]
+
5:08 PM | There’s no such thing as reptiles any more – and here’s why
You have likely been to a zoo at some point and visited their reptile house. A building where the climate control dial is stuck on the “wet sauna” setting, and filled with maniacal children competing to be the first to press their ice cream covered face and hands on every available piece of clean glass. Subject:  Animal Research
1234567
209 Results