Posts

October 15, 2014

+
6:36 PM | Change your walking style, change your mood
Our mood can affect how we walk — slump-shouldered if we're sad, bouncing along if we're happy. Now researchers have shown it works the other way too — making people imitate a happy or sad way of walking actually affects their mood. Subjects who were prompted to walk in a more depressed style, with less arm movement and their shoulders rolled forward, experienced worse moods than those who were induced to walk in a happier style, according to the study published in the […]
+
6:32 PM | Weather history time machine
During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can't explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting. Subject:  Earth Science
+
6:27 PM | Blinded by science
Do you believe in science? Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn't tell you much. Subject:  Technology
+
5:13 PM | How AI research is bringing game characters to life
In an era of crowd-sourced machine intelligence, games may be about to do what authors have been trying to do for centuries. The ambition to create “real”, believable characters has been a cornerstone of literature since the 19th century. The Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin praised Fyodor Dostoyevsky for his ability to give each of his protagonists their own sets of beliefs, “as if the character were not an object of authorial discourse, but rather a fully valid, […]
+
5:08 PM | There’s no such thing as reptiles any more – and here’s why
You have likely been to a zoo at some point and visited their reptile house. A building where the climate control dial is stuck on the “wet sauna” setting, and filled with maniacal children competing to be the first to press their ice cream covered face and hands on every available piece of clean glass. Subject:  Animal Research
+
4:51 PM | Bullies in the workplace
The stories are shocking and heartbreaking, but they are often disjointed and hard to follow. In severe cases, the narratives are even more chaotic. This is reality for victims of workplace bullying and a major reason why they stay silent, said Stacy Tye-Williams, an assistant professor of communications studies and English at Iowa State University. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
3:16 PM | In some men, an increase in PSA after prostate cancer surgery may not lead to metastasis in their lifetime
Some prostate cancer patients whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels increase after a radical prostatectomy may die of causes unrelated to prostate cancer before they are diagnosed with a prostate cancer metastasis, and therefore treating them for recurrence may not be beneficial, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
2:11 AM | Landing on a comet: The trailer
In less than a month, on November 12, 2014, the 100-kg Philae lander will separate from ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft and descend several kilometers down to the dark, dusty and frozen surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, its three spindly legs and rocket-powered harpoon all that will keep it from crashing or bouncing hopelessly back out into space. It will be the culmination of a decade-long voyage across the inner Solar System, a testament to human ingenuity and inventiveness […]
+
2:04 AM | Programming computers in everyday language
Computer scientists from KIT work on software that translates commands formulated in natural language into programming language and automatically adapts the order of execution. Subject:  Computer Science
+
12:47 AM | Earth's magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime
Imagine the world waking up one morning to discover that all compasses pointed south instead of north. It's not as bizarre as it sounds. Earth's magnetic field has flipped – though not overnight – many times throughout the planet's history. Its dipole magnetic field, like that of a bar magnet, remains about the same intensity for thousands to millions of years, but for incompletely known reasons it occasionally weakens and, presumably over a few thousand years, reverses […]
+
12:42 AM | Researchers develops ultra-fast charging batteries that last 20 years
Scientists at Nanyang Technology University (NTU) have developed ultra-fast charging batteries that can be recharged up to 70 per cent in only two minutes. The new generation batteries also have a long lifespan of over 20 years, more than 10 times compared to existing lithium-ion batteries. This breakthrough has a wide-ranging impact on all industries, especially for electric vehicles, where consumers are put off by the long recharge times and its limited battery life. […]

October 14, 2014

+
7:47 PM | The neuroscience of holding it
Wherever you are right now: squeeze your glutes. Feel that? You just also contracted your pelvic floor too, whether you wanted to or not. Subject:  Biology & Aging
+
6:12 PM | The exClone Project
exClone is a human-like dialogue system that encaptures a person’s expertise via digital cloning. Once the digital cloning is complete, an exClone is born and it has an independent, autonomous, and self-conscious life. It can learn from social conversations to improve its knowledge. It can also keep reading new material to get better following the directions and personality traits of its creator.
+
6:02 PM | Unique catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells synthesized in ordinary kitchen microwave oven
Swedish and Chinese researchers show how a unique nano-alloy composed of palladium nano-islands embedded in tungsten nanoparticles creates a new type of catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction, the most important reaction in hydrogen fuel cells. Their results are published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. Subject:  Technology
+
4:42 PM | Google Now scores higher than Siri and Cortana on massive knowledge quiz
Apple’s famous artificial intelligence agent is eating humble pie today. Ask Siri “Who is smarter, Siri or Google Now?” and Siri obligingly links to an article about a recent 3,086-question challenge that ranked Google Now as the top scorer. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence
+
4:03 PM | Mars One (and done?)
MIT team independently assesses the technical feasibility of the proposed Mars One mission. In 2012, the “Mars One” project, led by a Dutch nonprofit, announced plans to establish the first human colony on the Red Planet by 2025. The mission would initially send four astronauts on a one-way trip to Mars, where they would spend the rest of their lives building the first permanent human settlement. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
3:51 PM | New device detects several types of cancer
Scientists have devised a way to detect microRNAs to screen for many cancers with one test in an affordable, accurate and non-invasive way.

October 13, 2014

+
10:07 PM | 'Love hormone' controls sexual behaviour
A small group of neurons that respond to the hormone oxytocin are key to controlling sexual behaviour in mice, a team has discovered. The researchers switched off these cells which meant they were no longer receptive to oxytocin. This "love hormone" is already known to be important for many intimate social situations. Without it, female mice were no more attracted to a mate than to a block of Lego, the team report in journal Cell. READ MORE Subject:  Biology & […]
+
9:36 PM | Why cancer researchers are excited about this amoeba
A type of amoeba that lives in soil has a gene that is very similar to a tumor-fighting gene found in humans. The human gene is called PTEN. When it’s healthy, it stops tumors from growing. But the gene is prone to mutations, and those mutations are linked to lots of cancers. Subject:  Biology & Aging
+
9:15 PM | Elon Musk: Don't fall asleep at the wheel for another 5 years
Following Tesla's news that it's bringing autopilot to its electric sports cars, CEO Elon Musk says autonomous, self-driving cars aren't far off either. Elon Musk takes a cautious approach to artificial intelligence, but he's certainly not afraid of making our cars a little -- or even a lot -- smarter. After the Tesla Motors founder unveiled a new autopilot feature for the company's line of electric sports cars Thursday, he told Bloomberg Television that fully autonomous vehicles […]
+
8:43 PM | Do we want an augmented reality or a transformed reality?
It seems we are headed towards a world where augmented reality (AR) systems will be as common as smartphones are today – it’s already about to revolutionise medicine, entertainment, the lives of Subject:  Technology
+
8:33 PM | Paving the way for a fructose tolerance test
Increased consumption of table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup has been linked to rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States and throughout the world. Both sweeteners are commonly found in processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, and both are made up of nearly equal amounts of two basic sugars, glucose and fructose. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
8:27 PM | Chemical derived from broccoli sprouts shows promise in treating autism
A small study led by investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has found evidence that daily treatment with sulforaphane – a molecule found in foods such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage – may improve some symptoms of autism spectrum disorders. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
4:20 PM | How binge drinking alters your genes
Scientists say binge drinking causes epigenetic changes in histone structures in the liver. “Epigenetic alterations are changes in genes that are not caused by changes in the DNA sequence or genetic code,” says Shivendra Shukla, a professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. Subject:  Genetics
+
4:08 PM | A different gap
We’re often told that when facing philosophical problems, we should try to ‘carve them at the joints’. The biggest joint on offer in the case of consciousness has seemed to be the ‘explanatory gap’ between the physical activity of neurons and the subjective experience of consciousness. Now, in the latest JCS, Reggia, Monner, and Sylvester suggest that there is another gap, and one where our attention should rightly be focussed. Subject:  […]
+
3:46 PM | Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant
A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
3:37 PM | Greek Bronze Age may have ended 100 years earlier than thought
Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon analyses. Historical chronologies traditionally place the end of the Greek Bronze Age at around 1025 B.C., but research suggests a date 70 to 100 years earlier. Subject:  Anthropology
+
1:23 AM | Quantum computing poised for new silicon revolution
A dramatic increase in the amount of time data can be stored on a single atom means silicon could once again play a vital role in the development of super-fast computers. The silicon chip revolutionised most aspects of everyday life since it was invented in the 1950s. It’s changed the way that we communicate with each other, and how we operate almost all everyday items, from cars to airplanes, fridges to televisions and our smart-phones and tablets. Subject:  […]

October 12, 2014

+
10:56 PM | Rough Mandelbrot Sets
I’ve been reading up on Zdzisław Pawlak’s Rough Set Theory recently and wanted to play with them. They are used to address vagueness in data so fractals seem like a good subject. Super Quick Intro to Rough Sets: A rough set is a … Continue reading →
+
5:50 PM | Texas health care worker tests positive for Ebola
A Dallas health care worker who provided care for the Ebola patient hospitalized there has tested positive for the virus in a preliminary test, Texas health officers said on Sunday, becoming the second person on U.S. soil to contract the deadly disease ravaging parts of Africa. The worker, based at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital where Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan eventually succumbed to the disease, reported a low grade fever Friday night and was isolated and referred […]
123456789
254 Results