Posts

February 27, 2015

+
11:03 PM | Robust scientific evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a biological illness
Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health identified distinct immune changes in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS) or systemic exertion intolerance disease. The findings could help improve diagnosis and identify treatment options for the disabling disorder, in which symptoms range from extreme fatigue and difficulty concentrating to headaches and […]
+
10:41 PM | Ultra-small bacteria found at the lower size limit of life
Scientists have captured the first detailed microscopy images of ultra-small bacteria that are believed to be about as small as life can get. The research was led by scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley. The existence of ultra-small bacteria has been debated for two decades, but there hasn't been a comprehensive electron microscopy and DNA-based description of the microbes until now. […]
+
9:26 PM | Leonard Nimoy, Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83
Leonard Nimoy, the sonorous, gaunt-faced actor who won a worshipful global following as Mr. Spock, the resolutely logical human-alien first officer of the Starship Enterprise in the television and movie juggernaut "Star Trek," died on Friday morning at his home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. He was 83. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, confirmed his death, saying the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subject:  Technology
+
9:16 PM | Life 'not as we know it' possible on Saturn's moon Titan
A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled by a team of Cornell University researchers. Taking a simultaneously imaginative and rigidly scientific view, chemical engineers and astronomers offer a template for life that could thrive in a harsh, cold world - specifically Titan, the giant moon of Saturn. A planetary body awash with seas not of water, but of liquid methane, Titan could harbor […]
+
8:32 PM | Investment firm to start artificial-intelligence team
The world’s largest hedge fund manager is banking on machines. Ray Dalio’s $165 billion Bridgewater Associates will start a new, artificial-intelligence unit next month with about half a dozen people, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. The team will report to David Ferrucci, who joined Bridgewater at the end of 2012 after leading the International Business Machines Corp. engineers that developed Watson, the computer that beat human players on the […]
+
5:29 PM | Breakthrough in understanding how cancer cells metastasize
Montreal Neurological Institute scientists discover a new mechanism driving spread of cancer. A protein commonly found in human cells could be an important switch that activates cancer cell metastasis, according to a new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro at McGill University and the MUHC. The finding focuses attention on a biological mechanism that until now was largely overlooked. The discovery of the protein’s effect […]
+
4:13 PM | Suicide rates rising for older US adults
Suicide rates for adults between 40 and 64 years of age in the U.S. have risen about 40% since 1999, with a sharp rise since 2007. One possible explanation could be the detrimental effects of the economic downturn of 2007-2009, leading to disproportionate effects on house values, household finances, and retirement savings for that age group. In a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers found that external economic factors were present in 37.5% of […]
+
3:59 PM | Feast or famine diet could extend longevity
Think of it as interval training for the dinner table. University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. Fasting has been shown in mice to extend lifespan and to improve age-related diseases. But fasting every day, which could entail skipping meals or simply reducing overall caloric intake, can be hard to maintain. […]
+
3:39 PM | Methane confirmed in Mars' atmosphere
An article published in Science confirms the existence of methane fluctuations in the atmosphere of Mars, as a result of the detailed analysis of data sent during 605 soles or Martian days. The tunable laser spectrometer in the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument of the Curiosity robot has unequivocally detected an episodic increase in the concentration of methane in Mars' atmosphere after an exhaustive analysis of data obtained during 605 soles or Martian days. […]
+
6:09 AM | Scientists reverse type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats
Yale researchers developed a controlled-release oral therapy that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study published on Feb. 26 by Science. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
1:51 AM | Screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood
It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not a primary care provider, dental visits may be an opportune site for diabetes screening and monitoring glucose control for many at-risk patients. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
1:13 AM | Monster black hole discovered at cosmic dawn
In a paper in the journal Nature, researchers report the discovery of the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. The international team led by astronomers from Peking University in China and from the University of Arizona announce their findings in the scientific journal Nature on […]

February 26, 2015

+
11:47 PM | First full-scale urban hyperloop system planned for California
Hyperloop Transportation Technologies has reached an agreement for the first working Hyperloop passenger transportation system on a five-mile stretch in California’s Central Valley as part of Quay Valley, a new, sustainable 21st Century town. Subject:  Technology
+
7:30 PM | FCC votes to classify Internet as a public utility
The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday approved net neutrality rules that restrict Internet providers' ability to control download speeds. The measure, which is backed by President Barack Obama, passed with a 3-2 vote along party lines. "These new rules are guided by three principles: America's broadband networks must be fast, fair and open, principles shared by the overwhelming majority of the nearly 4 million commenters who participated in the FCC's Open Internet […]
+
7:01 PM | NYC mayor caves in to Orthodox Jews and risks children’s lives
In some Orthodox Jewish circles, it is the practice for infant boys to be circumcised, not by a doctor in sanitary conditions, but by a religious person known as a mohel who then sucks out some blood from the penis with his mouth. This extremely unhygienic practice can lead, and has led, to serious infections, and “City health officials linked 17 cases of neonatal herpes to direct oral suction in the last 15 years. Subject:  Atheism & Religion […]
+
3:21 PM | What's it like to drive on the moon?
This new stabilized footage shows Apollo 16's LRV rolling about the surface of the moon. Video stabilization was done using a Deshaker v2.5 filter for VirtualDub 1.9.9.
+
3:12 PM | One brain area, two planning strategies
Ready to strike, the spear fisherman holds his spear above the water surface. He aims at the fish. But he is misled by the view: Due to the refraction of light on the surface, he does not see the actual location of the fish. How must his brain now plan the arm movement? Do the brain cells (neurons) reflect the position where the fish was spotted, in other words, the visual target? Or do they plan the physical target, which is the actual direction in which the arm and spear should move […]
+
3:02 PM | Technology as a social lifeline for kids with Asperger’s
Technology is often maligned for having a negative influence on young people, particularly on their ability to develop healthy social relations and a sense of identity. But technology can also be a force for good. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
2:50 PM | Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may control brain serotonin
Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has until now been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate […]
+
2:45 PM | Sewage provides insight into human microbiome
A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals. Subject:  Biology & Aging
+
2:42 PM | Has Stanford University found a cure for Alzheimer's disease?
A drug which boosts the brain's immune response could prevent or cure Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's could be prevented and even cured by boosting the brain's own immune response, new research suggests. Researchers at Standford University discovered that nerve cells die because cells which are supposed to clear the brain of bacteria, viruses and dangerous deposits, stop working. These cells, called 'microglia' function well when people are young, but when they age, a single protein […]
+
2:22 AM | Machines master classic video games without being told the rules
Think you’re good at classic arcade games such as Space Invaders, Breakout and Pong? Think again. In a groundbreaking paper published today in Nature, a team of researchers led by DeepMind co-founder Demis Hassabis reported developing a deep neural network that was able to learn to play such games at an expert level. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence
+
1:22 AM | Study maps extroversion types in the brain's anatomy
Everyday experience and psychological studies alike tell us that there are two different types of extroverts: The gregarious "people-persons" who find reward in sharing affection and affiliation with others, and the ambitious "go-getters" who flash those bright-white smiles in their pursuit of achievement and leadership agendas. A new study shows that these overlapping yet distinct personalities have commensurately overlapping yet distinct signatures in the anatomy of the brain. […]

February 25, 2015

+
3:36 PM | More than 2 hours of TV a day increases high blood pressure risk in children by 30 percent
A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. Subject:  Health & Medicine
+
3:31 PM | Bionic hand reconstruction success
Three Austrian men have become the first in the world to undergo a new technique called “bionic reconstruction”, enabling them to use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by their mind, according to new research published in The Lancet. All three men suffered for many years with brachial plexus injuries [1] and poor hand function as a result of motor vehicle and climbing accidents. Subject:  Technology
+
3:21 PM | The many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics
Those who have read about quantum mechanics have heard about the Many Worlds Interpretation (MWI) proposed by Hugh Everett in 1957. It is an idea that seems unbelievable when one first hears of it because it implies the existence of many—a huge number in fact—of unobservable worlds that exist in parallel to our own but of which we are unaware. One needs to get over the initial feeling of incredulity before one can judge it properly on its merits. Subject:  […]
+
3:03 PM | Frequent sauna use protects men against cardiac death
Frequent - even daily - taking a sauna can reduce the risk of cardiac death, according to a recent study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The 20-year follow-up study discovered that men taking a sauna 4-7 times a week were 63% less likely to experience a sudden cardiac death than those taking a sauna once a week. Furthermore, the occurrence of death due to coronary artery disease and other cardiac events, as well as overall mortality, were less frequent in the group […]
+
2:50 PM | Sunlight continues to damage skin in the dark
Much of the damage that ultraviolet radiation (UV) does to skin occurs hours after sun exposure, a team of Yale-led researchers concluded in a study that was published online Feb. 19 by the journal Science. Subject:  Health & Medicine

February 24, 2015

+
6:28 PM | How to live forever
The fact that we cannot agree on whether our sense of self would survive copying is a reminder that our general understanding of consciousness and self-awareness is incredibly weak and limited. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
+
5:47 PM | New precision drugs target cancer weak spots
Scientists have identified weak spots in cancer cells that could be targeted and attacked by new precision drugs. A major computational analysis by scientists at the University of Sussex and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has found a number of potential targets for drugs that exploit the inherent weaknesses of cancer cells. Subject:  Health & Medicine
123456789
280 Results