Posts

April 06, 2015

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3:45 PM | Many Deaths Predicted from Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs
Overuse of antibiotics spells trouble for our ability to fight off common infections in 20 years, a grim new report says. Continue reading →
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1:01 PM | Vijf mythen over islamofobie deel 5 – Islamofobie bestaat niet
Een zesdelige serie over de mythen over islamofobie. Ditmaal deel 5: islamofobie bestaat niet.
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10:00 AM | Seeker Daily: America's Dead Malls Getting a New Lease on Life
Online shopping has led many of America's malls to shut down. Now colleges and medical clinics are buying up the abandoned spaces and giving them a new lease of life.
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8:40 AM | DNews: All About Exploding Head Syndrome ... Wait, What?
It sounds like a movie Ed Wood might have directed, but exploding head syndrome ifs totally for real. If you've ever woken up to an extremely loud noise whose source you could not pinpoint, you may have experienced it yourself. Trace explains.
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7:00 AM | Itching Is As Much In Your Brain As On Your Skin
An itch is defined as a sensation that makes you want to scratch it, and it's thought that the itching sensation and the pain sensations were somehow connected. Now, researchers have been able to isolate the chemical in our bodies that's responsible for transmitting the sensation of an itch to our brains and have successfully engineered mice that can continue to respond to other sensations while no longer being itchy. The discovery can have some incredible implications for those suffering from […]

April 05, 2015

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12:00 PM | Benedict Anderson About Nationalism (In mijn vaders huis, 1994)
In 1994 Dutch TV host Anil Ramdas (1958-2012) interviewed Benedict Anderson who wrote Imagined Communities, perhaps one of the best sold anthropological books ever and still relevant today. The introduction of the interview is in Dutch and after a few minutes it goes in in English with Dutch subtitles.
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9:05 AM | Easter weekend gardening offers
Succulent ‘eggs’ in Kathy Brown’s garden Happy Easter everyone, I hope the Easter bunny has brought you plenty of chocolate! If you’re in the mood for some garden shopping then there are some good offers on this weekend: Suttons are offering free P&P until midnight on Tuesday 7th April 2015 to everyone who uses the coupon code S15EASTER. You’ll have to be a bit quicker if you want to take advantage of the free P&P offer at Sarah Raven, as it only […]
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7:00 AM | The Pueblo Revolt Was The First American Revolution
During the 1500s, Spanish explorers enslaved the Pueblo people in the American Southwest and tried to destroy their religious practices. In 1680, the Pueblos organized the first revolution against a foreign colonial power on American soil. Under the leadership of medicine man Po'Pay, they successfully drove the Spaniards out of Pueblo territory in a surprise attack. However, Po'Pay soon began to act like a dictator himself and the Pueblo alliance fractured without the peace and prosperity the […]
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2:45 AM | Bones - Season 10, Episode 12 (Review)
The Teacher in the BooksEpisode SummaryTwo guys looking for scrap metal in an abandoned bookstore come across a dead body. The FBI is called for some reason, and the Jeffersonian team heads out to examine the body as well. Based on the oval shape of the pelvic inlet, the open cranial sutures, and the projecting nasal bones, Brennan thinks the deceased was a white female in her early 20s. Saroyan notices ripped fingernails to indicate a struggle, and Hodgins puts time-of-death around a week ago […]

April 04, 2015

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7:00 AM | The Hero Who Tried To Stop The Nazis Before They Started
In 1933, a prosecutor named Josef Hartinger was called to Dachau to investigate a few suspicious deaths. It was his opinion that the bullet-ridden bodies had clearly been executed, and he filed official charges against the SS commanders in charge of the camp. Charges piled up and piled up, until they were ultimately squashed by Hitler. It wasn't for nothing, though; when the charges were discovered by the Allied forces, they were used at the Nuremberg Trials to show just how far back the Nazi's […]

April 03, 2015

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7:03 PM | Roman Bioarchaeology Carnival LXX
Last month brought a bunch of news related to Roman bioarchaeology, which is linked to below, as well as the annual American Association of Physical Anthropologists conference in St. Louis, MO.  I live-tweeted a bunch of bioarchaeology papers, including some classical ones, and you can find them by clicking through to my twitter feed (and looking for #AAPA2015; I unfortunately can't figure out how to filter out just my posts with that hashtag).  Without further ado, last month's news […]
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5:38 PM | Book review: Steeped
Steeped, by Annalies Zijderveld I have been a tea drinker for as much of my life as I can remember, but for most of that time tea has been a part of the background of my life – ever present, but not something I took much notice of. In the last few months that has changed, and I have been exploring new blends and flavours of tea, and I am looking forward to growing some of my own tea plants in my new garden this summer. It may seem to be a logical next step to include tea in food […]
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3:25 PM | Real Paleo, Kennewick Man, Ate Mostly Seafood
Analysis of a man who lived in Washington state some 9,000 years ago reveal he didn't eat game meat, but stuck mostly to seafood. Why? Continue reading →
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12:20 PM | Joni Mitchell's Mysterious Disease: What Causes Morgellons?
People who suffer from Morgellons say they have a bizarre range of symptoms including sensations of crawling or stinging on and under their skin.
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7:00 AM | Some People Have A Way Of Sniffing Each Other Like Dogs Do
Unlike animals that directly sniff each other, humans are more discreet. After shaking hands with another person, we raise our hands to our faces and smell the scent without realizing it. Researchers believe it's an unconscious form of chemical communication. Earlier studies found that the scent of a woman's tears turns off men and the smell of sweat can signal fear. The post Some People Have A Way Of Sniffing Each Other Like Dogs Do appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

April 02, 2015

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6:30 PM | Too Much Iced Tea Blamed for Man's Kidney Failure
The man told his doctors that he drank 16 glasses of iced tea daily.
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5:21 PM | DNews: 5 Pregnancy Myths Debunked
Pregnant women get bombarded with advice from friends, strangers, and popular culture at large. Unfortunately, the guidance can be somewhat, well, misguided. Trace looks at some of the key myths pregnant women are likely to encounter.
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2:35 PM | DNA Blood Test Detects Down Syndrome Better
New test returns fewer false positives than standard testing.
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2:23 PM | Exercising Moms Can Reduce Risks for Newborns
A study on mice finds a direct link between exercise and reduced risk of congenital heart defects among babies of older moms.
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7:00 AM | Where Posting On Facebook Is Punished As Harshly As Murder
In 2014, a researcher for the Electronic Frontier Foundation discovered that the South Carolina Department of Corrections was punishing inmates for using social media as harshly as if they had murdered, raped, or taken someone hostage. In one of the most draconian cases, Tyheem Henry received a sentence of almost 38 years in solitary confinement for posting on Facebook for 38 days. Inmates are often prohibited from using social media to ensure that they don't engage in witness intimidation, […]
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6:10 AM | Then and Now: April Fools’ Day—How did we get here?
Where is here exactly? Here is a tired, eye-roll inducing pseudo-holiday that we endure with a grimace every year. Hopefully you have room for one more article about April Fools’ Day. Maybe you... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:10 AM | Then and Now: April Fools’ Day—How did we get here?
Where is here exactly? Here is a tired, eye-roll inducing pseudo-holiday that we endure with a grimace every year. Hopefully you have room for one more article about April Fools’ Day. Maybe you... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

April 01, 2015

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6:00 PM | Human Ancestor Lucy Wasn't Alone: Meet 'Little Foot'
The findings focus on a skeleton which represents a species in the same group as Lucy, known as Australopithecus.
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4:25 PM | DNews: Separating Fact from Fiction for Photographic Memory
Are there real Will Huntings out there, or is the idea of a scary-good, photographic memory just the stuff of fiction?
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3:00 PM | Bizarre Condition Makes Tongue Resemble a Map
Known as geographic tongue, the condition causes red, patchy shapes to appear on the tongue.
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2:28 PM | Things I Wish Were April Fool’s Day Jokes
There are a lot of times when I’m reading an article from a popular news source and just hoping that it is a joke, or that I accidentally read The […]
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12:23 PM | From the Archives: Approaching Ethnicity in Archaeology
Today in my ANP 203: Introduction to Archaeology class, we are talking about ethnicity vs ancestry, so I thought it would be a good time to repost this article on […]
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9:00 AM | Redpolls: genetically similar, phenotypically different
Redpolls are a group of small birds in the finch family, members of the genus Acanthis.  They breed in the far north, but sometimes migrate as far south as the central US in winter, when food is scarce further north.  They rely on a small variety of seeds, and sometimes travel a remarkable thousands of miles to find them. Range of the Common Redpoll; Source: Cornell Lab of OrnithologyAll redpolls share characteristic red markings on their heads, but otherwise these birds vary enough […]
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8:00 AM | Reader offer: Save 20% on Lubera's exciting plants
Lubera’s new ‘Sunset’ edible dahlia variety The paperback version of Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs will be out later this month. It’s a jaunt into the world of unusual edible plants, and the people who grow them, touching on topics such as forgotten vegetables, perennial pleasures, unusual herbs and Andean crops. Heritage/ heirloom varieties are discussed in the book, but so too are the new varieties that result from ongoing breeding efforts, so it seems like a good […]
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7:13 AM | Prehistoric rock crystal extraction in the Alps
I have written about the most famous rock crystal find from the Swiss Alps, the Planggenstock Treasure and the use of rock crystal through the millennia before. We know where the Planggenstock Treasure and other recent finds were originally found. … Continue reading →
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