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Posts

April 04, 2014

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9:00 AM | Teaching High School Science
Anne and I have been helping judge Pennsylvania high school student science projects for a number of years, including this week.  Students submit papers and give 12-minute presentations to a panel of judges and an audience, followed by questions, as in the format of many scientific society meetings.  The winners go on to national competitions.There are many very fine projects, some just fine on their own--that is, as a reflection of a well-trained student picking a good topic, and […]

April 03, 2014

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7:51 PM | Syria War – British Muslims on the front line
Closer Blog: Bilal Abdul Kareem lives in Syria and documents the lives of fighters and aid workers in Syria. In this episode Tauqir and his wife Racquell Hayden-Best. Read more: Syria War – British Muslims on the front line
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7:06 PM | Re-Analysis and Death in Iron Age Britain
Re-analysis is an interesting phenomenon in archaeology. It can be both a good thing and a bad thing depending on the collection and type of materials. Re-analysis is exactly what […]

Armit, I., Neale, N., Shapland, F., Bosworth, H., Hamilton, D. & Mckenzie, J. (2013). The Ins and Outs of Death in the Iron Age: Complex Funerary Treatments at Broxmouth Hillfort, East Lothian, Oxford Journal of Archaeology, 32 (1) 73-100. DOI:

Citation
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11:53 AM | Creativity in Osteology Labs
As I mentioned in my "Hyoidkus" post, I've taken the opportunity afforded by teaching Human Osteology at a new institution to overhaul old labs and create spiffy new ones that attempt to engage students' abilities to think both rationally and creatively.  Here are some of the creative activities from the last three labs, with the best among student responses to each...In your lab write-up, include a paragraph describing – using as precise anatomical terminology as possible – […]
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11:00 AM | Soldier Kills Three, Self in Shooting at Fort Hood
A soldier with mental health issues killed three people and wounded 16 before turning the gun on himself.
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9:00 AM | STEMing the educational tide? Aldo Leopold on professoring
Aldo Leopold was a naturalist and conservationist who wrote many things for pubic consumption as well as being a leader in academic conservation research. His writings, especially perhaps in A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There (orig. 1949, repub. 1987, Oxford), are widely admired for their poetic depiction of wilderness and living nature, and his lament about what we are doing to it. We often write about the role of science in current society. One issue is the way science […]

April 02, 2014

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9:30 PM | Aye, Cap'n: Cereal Boxes That Stare Increase Sales
Shoppers are more likely to purchase a cereal that makes eye contact, find researchers at Cornell's Food and Brand Lab.
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9:19 PM | Bones - Season 9, Episode 19 (Review)
The Turn in the UrnEpisode SummaryBooth and Brennan attend a funeral for Todd Mirga, a billionaire Romani hedgefund manager who funded Brennan's research in the past and was found in his safe room, having OD'ed on heroin. During the funeral, however, Todd shows up and claims that he was out of the country in rehab for his heroin problem. The team scans images of the dead body and notes that, when the body was found three weeks after death, the face was swollen and unrecognizable, and the body […]
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6:29 PM | Couple in Qatar Found Guilty in Organ Theft Death
An American couple say they have been wrongly convicted of causing the death of their adopted daughter. Continue reading →
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5:57 PM | The Missing Link that Wasn’t
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:57 PM | The Missing Link that Wasn’t
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:30 PM | Did Hobbits Exist?
Transcript: Everyone knows that Lord of the Rings is a work of fiction.  There is no evidence that JRR Tolkien’s elves, wizards, dwarves or orcs ever existed.  But recent discoveries have raised an important question: did hobbits actually exist?   In September 2003 a team of archaeologists led by Peter Brown and Mike Morwood unearthed […]Did Hobbits Exist? was first posted on April 2, 2014 at 3:30 pm.©2013 "The Advanced Apes". Use of this feed is for personal […]
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2:05 PM | Silver Nanoparticles May Harm Humans and Wildlife
Unhealthy reactions in human intestinal cells and aquatic algae have been documented after exposure to silver nanoparticles. Continue reading →
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12:57 PM | DNews: How Inbreeding Screws Up Your Genes!
Incest has become quite the topic of conversation lately, as it has been popularized in the show Game of Thrones. Why is inbreeding bad scientifically? Join Laci as she discusses all the reasons why.
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9:00 AM | Entropy and context-dependency: an epidemiological dilemma
Yesterday we discussed the problems facing genetic and environmental epidemiology (and, though we did not say it, many other fields of science as well).  It had to do with complexity and the difficulty of isolating causal variables and showing their effect.  One issue is not just that our current big-data statistical approaches are not doing adequately well at present, but whether we face inevitable limits to what we can know--now or ever!  As we said yesterday, one should never […]

April 01, 2014

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6:43 PM | DNews: The Ways Being a Kid Affects You Forever
Brain development during your childhood is critically important. How will some of your experiences affect you in adulthood? Trace is joined by Dr. Kiki Sanford to break down a few of the ways that it will change you for the rest of your life!
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3:11 PM | Darth Vader Bids for Ukraine Presidency
The Sith lord, a candidate of the Ukrainian Internet Party, vows to make an empire out of a republic.
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1:40 PM | Veggies Top Fruits for Prolonging Life
Eating seven or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day reduces people's risk of dying
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1:26 PM | Who needs a classicist? (Installment 1)
You're all probably aware of my occasional series, "Who needs an osteologist?" where I show images with poorly laid-out skeletons because no one thought to consult an osteologist or even the internet.  Well, while watching last night's Bones, I realized there's a need for a new series, "Who needs a classicist?"According to Brennan, this is a Mesopotamian "sacrificial basin" from 3000 BC:Yeah, no.  This looks like an Attic red-figure lekanis to me (dating to about 400-300 BC). […]
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11:28 AM | The Future of Blogging for Bones Don’t Lie
This is the final blog post in a series of larger blogging carnival posts hosted by the blog Doug’s Archaeology. The previous posts have focused on why we blog, what […]
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9:00 AM | Is complex disease risk predictable, or even parseable? Problems without solutions?
A very smart friend of ours tells us that he likes our posts about the problems that are impeding the kind of progress toward explaining and predicting disease that are major goals of genetics and epidemiology.  What causes asthma, or heart disease, or obesity, or hypertension or breast cancer?  And, how can we know who is going to get these diseases?  We have written a lot about why these questions are so hard to answer.  But now our friend is asking us for a solution. […]
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8:10 AM | The Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs Tour
It’s only a month until the publication of Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs, and in true plant hunter style I am donning my pith helmet and setting off on an adventure, exploring the digital world oin my virtual book tour. I don’t have to go too far today, as I’m hosting a special edition of the Alternative Kitchen Garden Show, including a reading from the book. Here’s the tentative schedule for the rest of the tour, which will shape up as the month continues (shout […]

March 31, 2014

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11:00 PM | April Fools! 5 Hilarious Fake Scientific Breakthroughs
Scientists and scientific publications don't often get to pull pranks or tell lies. When April 1st rolls around, they are ready to let rip.
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7:11 PM | DNews: Do Our Dreams Mean Anything?
Recurring dreams can be weird and confusing. Why do we dream about some things more often, and how should we interpret them? Annie joins DNews today to talk about some common dreams, and some theories as to why they occur.
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7:02 PM | Roman Bioarchaeology Carnival XXXIX
News from the Roman and Roman-adjacent world for March... Strangely, no good pictures of bones this month.Roman-Area Finds and Articles24 February - Authorities to Seize a Roman Statue in Queens That They Say Was Stolen (NY Times). The illegally obtained life-size sarcophagus lid, which depicts Ariadne, may have been looted from a Swiss gallery in 2002.3 March - New Discoveries at the Gallic Necropolis of Esvres-sur-Indre (Past Horizons). This Late Iron Age/Early Roman cemetery in […]
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6:21 PM | Blogging (Bio)Archaeology - Where do we go from here?
Doug's question this month for the Blogging Archaeology carnival is, "Where are you going with blogging or where would you like it to go?  My answer is pretty simple: I'd like to write more.The latest incarnation of this blog coincided with my jump into a sort of public-facing science blogging (the whole "Gay Caveman" thing).  Since then, I've written a whole bunch of essays that I'm pretty proud of, like:Line on the Left, One Cross Each: The Bioarchaeology of […]
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12:41 PM | DNews: Do Our Dreams Mean Anything?
Recurring dreams can be weird and confusing. Why do we dream about some things more often, and how should we interpret them? Annie joins DNews today to talk about some common dreams, and some theories as to why they occur.
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12:26 PM | March Berry-go-round: Unusual edible plants
Welcome to the March edition of the Berry-go-round, a blog carnival devoted to all that’s wonderful and intriguing about Earth’s flora. This month I set a theme of “Unusual Edible Plants”, and bloggers from far and wide duly rose to the challenge. Tamarisk Tree, by Robert Wallace, on Flickr Gravity’s Rainbow took the opportunity to bring our attention to a post from the archives. Invasive species – making the best of a bad situation raises an important […]
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9:00 AM | Early childhood interventions and health in later life -- or not?
On the heels of our Friday post on the causes of obesity comes a paper in Science ("Early Childhood Investments Substantially Boost Adult Health," Campbell et al.), reported by the NYTimes, ScienceNOW, and other venues, about the effects of early childhood intervention in poor children on the children's subsequent educational achievement and, relevant to our discussion of obesity and cardiovascular disease, their health in later life. The studyIn 1972 researchers in North […]
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8:57 AM | Can you die of a broken heart?
Extreme emotion can be a killer, says Jason G Goldman. So why did it take doctors so long to see the evidence hiding in plain sight?
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