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Posts

April 10, 2014

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12:34 PM | Defending my PhD Proposal
Today, I am defending my PhD proposal. I’ve been working on this proposal since last summer, and its finally ready for a public defense. I am extremely excited and nervous! […]
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9:52 AM | Can we drive our own evolution?
The way we eat, cook, explore and interact with others can influence our genes, says Jason G Goldman. So how will modern culture shape our children?
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9:00 AM | As remarkable as science, and as unremarkable as most science
Last Saturday we went to the opera---well, to the Met's live broadcast to local movie theaters.  It was Puccini's La Boheme, an amazing, remarkable feat, the match of anything in science.  But there was even more.With something like 4 hours' notice, Kristine Opolais, an up and coming Latvian singer, who had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Buttefly the night before, and got no sleep, got a message early in the morning asking if she'd sing the lead role, Mimi, in […]
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7:02 AM | The Chinese TV Show That Showed Death Row Inmates’ Last Minutes
The Chinese show Interviews Before Execution took reality TV to unsettling new levels. For six years, reporter Ding Yu interviewed death row inmates, many of whom were only minutes away from walking the green mile. As you might assume, the program was wildly popular, and it sometimes got a bit dramatic. The post The Chinese TV Show That Showed Death Row Inmates’ Last Minutes appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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7:01 AM | Zulu Warriors Killed Napoleon (The Fourth)
Napoleon IV, grand-nephew to Napoleon and son to Napoleon III, was killed by Zulus while serving with the British in South Africa at the age of 23. His death caused a major scandal and saw the officer meant to watch over him brought to trial, as well as ending the slim hopes of a Bonapartist restoration in France. The post Zulu Warriors Killed Napoleon (The Fourth) appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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7:00 AM | The Many And Varied Types Of Archaeology
Archaeology is one of those careers we'd all like to have, as long as we can be Indiana Jones. It's rarely like that, though, and it's also one of those careers that's been vastly misrepresented by the media. Archaeologists aren't just archaeologists: They're marine and underwater archaeologists, prehistoric archaeologists, battlefield archaeologists, aerial archaeologists, or even biblical archaeologists. The post The Many And Varied Types Of Archaeology appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

April 09, 2014

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7:00 PM | Knife vs. Gun: What a Weapon Reveals
The close contact required with stabbings could mean more rage, experts say.
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5:17 PM | Magic for Dogs, and What That Says about Vision and Consciousness
I just saw this cute video of a professional magician playing tricks with dogs. It is striking to me just how much the dogs expect the treat to be there, to have fallen to the floor, and also check back …The post Magic for Dogs, and What That Says about Vision and Consciousness appeared first on Neuroanthropology.
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1:00 PM | Old or New Violin? Musicians Can't Tell
A centuries-old Stradivarius, or a shiny new violin? Expert players couldn't tell.
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9:30 AM | development through research??
15 years ago, when Chief Khunchai first took a job managing a malaria clinic on a remote stretch of the Thailand-Myanmar (still Burma at that time) border, there weren’t year round roads, there was no electricity, no telephones, and the endemic guerilla warfare between the Karen and the Burmese didn’t pay much attention to the international border.  A Karen military base was just over the mountain on the other side of the river.  Sometimes when fights broke out, mortars […]
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7:02 AM | The Unfortunate Australian Utopia In Paraguay
In 1893, 220 Australians sailed out of Sydney to start a new life in Paraguay. Their settlement, named New Australia, was to be a "socialist utopia," and went about as well as anything bearing that description, quickly abandoning its founding principles and even splitting in two. Today, a substantial number of Paraguayan Australians still exist and continue to maintain some of their heritage. The post The Unfortunate Australian Utopia In Paraguay appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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7:01 AM | Some Animals Can Consume Knowledge Through Cannibalism
"Certain species of flatworm have been gradually taught to run a maze. If you grind them up and feed them to a second batch of flatworms, the second batch can run the maze on the first try." --Peter O'Toole in "Phantoms." The above statement got everyone looking for proof, because even a rotter of a movie can't throw around scientific statements without there being some truth to them. It turns out that this fact is a fact, true, and very difficult to believe. Experiments from the 1960s […]
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7:00 AM | Cracking Your Knuckles Won’t Give You Arthritis
It's a habit that some people find relief in, and others find annoying. Everyone who's done it has probably been told that they're increasing their risk for arthritis, but there's absolutely no medical evidence to support this claim. There are, however, other dangers such as dislocated fingers associated with obsessive knuckle-cracking, so many medical experts recommend you still don't do it. The post Cracking Your Knuckles Won’t Give You Arthritis appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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5:46 AM | Los constructores de montículos
Cuando oímos hablar de las “pseudociencias” tendemos a pensar en primer lugar en temas relacionados con la salud: homeopatía, acupuntura, curación por imposición de manos etc. Sin embargo, si nos paramos a pensar más detenidamente, nos vienen a la cabeza … Continue reading →

April 08, 2014

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8:07 PM | DNews: Are Scientists Close to Curing Down Syndrome?
Scientists have made huge leaps in the medical field when it comes to extending the lives of individuals with down syndrome. Now, researchers might be even closer to finding a cure for this genetic disorder, and Trace is here to tell you how!
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4:24 PM | Paralyzed People Move After Spinal Stimulation
Four paraplegics are newly able to move muscles using a new therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Continue reading →
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3:34 PM | DNews: How to Flirt Better Using Science
Physical attraction might not be the thing that gets you into a relationship. Flirting is extremely important, and Tara joins DNews today to discuss the science of flirting!
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1:30 PM | How to grow your own thong
A few weeks ago I received a press release from Waitrose about their new Alan Titchmarsh gardening range. It’s a fairly routine set of offerings, all nicely packaged up. The one that caught my eye was their ‘Broadfen’ horseradish, which they said was a “heritage variety first grown by the Egyptians (1500 BC).” I did a quick Google, and the internet appears to agree that horseradish was probably first grown by the Ancient Egyptians. But there’s no […]
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12:23 PM | Happy Day of DH- Announcing ieldran: Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery Mapping Project
Happy Day of Digital Humanities! This is a day where we celebrate the wide variety of ways that people use digital tools and technology to answer humanities/social science questions and […]
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9:34 AM | Siete días … 31 de marzo a 6 de abril
En esta nueva sección pretendo destacar los avances científicos que se han producido en la semana que termina, con enlaces directos a las noticias más relevantes e incluyendo los artículos originales para que el lector pueda acudir directamente a la fuente … Continue reading →
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9:29 AM | Relative Risk: Breast Cancer and Genetics — Review for the Progress Educational Trust
Last week, the Progress Education Trust launched a new project called ‘Breast Cancer: Chances, Choices and Genetics’, inspired by Angelina Jolie’s risk-reducing mastectomy surgery. It’s a topic I was previously keen on avoiding. I hoped to get through an entire science-writing career without using the ‘C’ word, but alas. I’ve reviewed the first of the […]
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9:00 AM | Thoughts on teaching, and poems of spring
Edward Hessler has been reading this blog for so long that we now consider him a friend.  As he more often than not has trouble posting comments on Blogger, he sends his comments to us by email. (Frustratingly, others have said they sometimes can't post comments, too, and we wish we knew how to fix the problem -- if you've got any suggestions, please post in a comment…. if you can.)  In any case, Edward usually includes a poem or two, and last week's email was no exception. […]
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7:02 AM | The German City Caught In The Middle Of World War III
The small city of Fulda was on the border between West and East Germany in the Cold War. It was the most likely area of attack for eastern European and Soviet forces in the event of World War III and unsurprisingly, over a million soldiers faced each other off in the region. Soviet forces would have attempted to break through there and exploit the routes through the valleys and mountains to the strategic city of Frankfurt. Had war broken out, one of, if no the largest tank battle would have […]
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7:01 AM | The Russian Terrorist Plot That Backfired Horribly
Narodnaya Volya was a Russian left-wing revolutionary terrorist group. Formed in 1879, Narodnaya Volya was passionate about political reform for the lower classes in a radical way. Frustrated by a lack of attention, the group decided to assassinate the czar (who was ironically also sympathetic to the lower classes) in 1881. After they did so, antiterrorist sentiment skyrocketed and the group was completely eliminated within a year. The post The Russian Terrorist Plot That Backfired Horribly […]
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7:00 AM | Civilization Didn’t Evolve to Agriculture The Way You Think
Originally found and dismissed in the 1960s, Gobekli Tepe is rewriting how we think of the evolution of modern society. Approximately 11,600 years old, the ancient temple was the center of a civilization that gave rise to some of the oldest known strains of crops and marked the change between hunter-gatherers and a farm-based society---and it might not have happened how we think. The temple construction pre-dates the strains of domestic crops, suggesting that agriculture didn't come first after […]
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4:05 AM | Bones - Season 9, Episode 20 (Review)
The High in the LowEpisode SummaryAs police chase an escaped criminal, the man finds a dead body in a hollow log he's attempting to hide in.  He freaks out.  Brennan and Booth, who are at a shooting range so Booth can practice for his shooty-runny-thinky FBI exam, get the call about the body and head out to Great Falls National Park which, amazingly, is actually close to D.C. The body has been shoved into a tree stump two miles from the nearest road. Most of the bugs are residents of […]

April 07, 2014

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7:32 PM | DNews: The Reason You Get the Spins When Drunk
If you've had one too many drinks, or mixed alcohol and marijuana, you might've felt like the room was spinning. It might even make you feel a bit sick. Annie discusses what causes this feeling, and offers a few theories on how to get it to stop.
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6:59 PM | Why We Can't Stop Gambling
An area of the brain may be hyperactive in problem gamblers, a new study suggests. Continue reading →
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5:49 PM | Book Review: Gardening Myths and Misconceptions
Professor Walsh: So, the Slayer. Buffy: Yeah, that’s me. Professor Walsh: We thought you were a myth. Buffy: Well, you were myth-taken. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, A New Man Anyone who has an interest in organic vegetable gardening, or No Dig techniques, is likely to have a book by Charles Dowding on their shelf – he is considered to be an expert on those subjects. His latest book, just published by Green Books, is a bit different. In Gardening Myths and Misconceptions […]
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5:15 PM | DNews: Salt Isn't Really That Bad For You
We've been told that our salt intake is dangerously high. While the Centers for Disease Control back this statement, is it true? Tara Long joins DNews to look at an interesting new study saying that Americans' salt intake is fine!
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