Posts

August 18, 2014

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2:00 PM | Infected Ebola Patients Flee After Attack on Clinic
Club-wielding young men storm the health center, claiming Ebola virus does not exist.
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11:25 AM | DNews: Do Weekends Make Workweek Stress Even Worse?
Ah, weekends ... our dear repose from the chaos of Monday through Friday. But are we fooling ourselves? A new study, and some "I don't like Mondays" rats, have together cast doubt on the idea of a weekend's restorative powers.
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9:57 AM | My temporary spice rack
My temporary spice rack “The important thing is the spices. A man can live on packaged food from here ‘til Judgment Day if he’s got enough rosemary.” Shepherd Book, Firefly We still don’t have a moving date. It feels oh so close, and at the same time, so very far away. It is months now since we put a lot of our things into storage to declutter the flat; my collection of herbs and spices was one of the things deemed non-essential, and I have been left with a […]
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9:00 AM | Logical Reasoning in Helsinki
Ken and I are in Finland this week co-teaching the Logical Reasoning in Human Genetics course that Ken and Joe Terwilliger have taught a number of times in a number of places over the last 10 years.  People in the class, and/or I, may do some live tweeting at #lrhg14. We'll be away for another week or so after the course.  We will do some blogging this week or next if we find the time.  If not, we'll be back the first week of September. Helsinki: Wikipedia
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7:00 AM | The Origin Of Murphy’s Law And Why It’s Real
If anything can go wrong, it will. This pessimistic phrase has been around for a long time, but it was only called Murphy's law when US Air Force colonel John Stapp applied the label after a technician working on his experiments with G-forces showed up with some key components that were completely defective. Until Stapp applied the unlucky man's name to the rule, it was earlier known as Sod's Law. And researchers have found out that it's a real thing---so next time it feels like the world is […]

August 17, 2014

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7:00 AM | The Vicious Booby Trap That Nailed Colin Powell
Back in the 1960s, Colin Powell was a young soldier fighting communist forces in Vietnam. However, he had way more than bullets and bombs to worry about. The enemy had spread booby traps across the country, and during one hike in the brush, Powell learned the hard way that you should always look where you step. The post The Vicious Booby Trap That Nailed Colin Powell appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

August 16, 2014

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2:46 PM | El primer viaje de nuestra vida
Ficha Técnica Título: El primer viaje de nuestra vida Autor: Juan Luis Arsuaga  Edita: Temas de Hoy, Madrid, 2012  Encuadernación: Tapa blanda con solapas  Número de páginas: 430  ISBN: 9788499981802  Precio: 19,90 €                 Cuando … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | 'Text Neck’ Epidemic Stems from Hunching Over Devices
A doctor believes text neck is a global epidemic that is literally changing the way our bodies should grow.
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7:00 AM | The Bald Knobbers: Missouri’s Deadly Vigilantes
At the end of the US Civil War, law enforcement in the Ozark region of Missouri was basically non-existent, and lawlessness reigned. Fed up with the crime and unpunished murderers, the Bald Knobbers group formed with the noble goal of bringing law and order back to the area. Unfortunately, these masked vigilantes became as corrupt as the people they were fighting against, and although they did instill some order, they did so with violence and terror. The post The Bald Knobbers: […]

August 15, 2014

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9:21 PM | How to conquer the world
Our species Homo sapiens has been around for some 200 000 years, and is generally thought to have evolved from older human species present in eastern and sub-Saharan Africa (University of Utah, 2005). But how did we come to be global (and even lunar) mammals? Debate still rages over how long ago H. sapiens left […]
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6:35 PM | Ebola Crisis Worse Than Reported
The World Health Organization says the crisis has been vastly underestimated. Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | 2nd Wave of Isolated People Makes Contact with Outsiders
Pushed out of their home territory by violence, a second wave of people who had been living in voluntary isolation in the Amazon rainforest has made contact with villagers in Brazil.
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11:30 AM | Robin Williams: Is Parkinson's Disease Linked to Suicide?
Parkinson's disease causes the loss of brain cells in a part of the brain that controls muscle movement.
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10:06 AM | DNews: Trustworthiness Is Written on Our Facial Features
A recent study has concluded that merely the design of a person's face is all it takes for us to decide whether or not we can trust them. Guest host William Haynes, from SourceFed, investigates the findings.
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9:00 AM | The abbatoir, the lab, and pre-medieval behavior
It's a lazy August day and one wonders what to write about.  So I took a walk with my constant companions--sadly, not a dog, but my iPod.  I was listening to one of the BBC Radio4 program podcasts that we like, and I thought it would be worth putting down some thoughts, hoping to make them relevant.Abbatoirs, or slaughterhouses, are among the most sensitive kinds of industrial plants.  This post was stimulated by the  BBC story I was listening to (File on 4: Inside the […]
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7:33 AM | The Difference Between A Real Smile And A Fake One
Admittedly, some people are better at pulling it off than others, but according to scientific research, there's still a definite difference between a real smile and a fake one. It all has to do with the interaction of the muscles around the mouth and cheeks with the muscles in the eyes, and there's only one unique combination of these muscle movements that results in a smile that means happiness or contentment. Other types of smiles---including the one that you give at a really bad joke---can […]

August 14, 2014

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5:23 PM | DNews: Antiperspirant May Make Us Smell Worse ... Huh?
A new study argues that the antiperspirant we've all been using on a daily basis might actually be making matters worse in the olfactory realm. Tara presents the malodorous details of the research.
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1:24 PM | Toilet paper
The Feedback section in the New Scientist last week (9th August 2014) was mostly devoted to the topic of toilet roll – having asked for figures on the annual consumption of this essential commodity, they have been regaled with anecdotes about the size of the army rations thereof, and differences in quality in different countries. It’s not often that the topic of toilet roll comes up in gardening circles. There is occasional talk, perhaps, of the lack of toilet facilities on […]
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9:00 AM | Anthropology's troublesome arguments
By Anne Buchanan and Ken WeissThese last few months have been strange ones for anthropology.  So much linen being aired so prominently, dirty and otherwise.  First we had a best-selling book by science journalist Nicholas Wade that in effect defines the field as the science of genetically determined traits, declaring among other things that there are five human races and that anyone who doesn't accept the biological basis of race is motivated not by science but by politics -- unlike […]
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7:51 AM | The Creator Of Modern Shopping Malls Hated Them
Victor Gruen is credited as being the creator of modern shopping malls, but his vision of the mall was nothing like what we see today. In fact, he hated what his ideas were turned into by money-hungry developers. Originally, Gruen envisioned shopping malls as something of an urban paradise, with massive green spaces, fountains, and running water interspersed with stores of all sorts and public services like banks and post offices. It wasn't long---only a few decades---before more commercially […]

August 13, 2014

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9:01 PM | How Did Patterns Help Reveal an Older Origin of Mummies?
I want to talk about patterns. We take them for granted but they shape our lives. That morning coffee you need to start your day has more meaning than you think. We build our sense of self on... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:01 PM | How Did Patterns Help Reveal an Older Origin of Mummies?
I want to talk about patterns. We take them for granted but they shape our lives. That morning coffee you need to start your day has more meaning than you think. We build our sense of self on... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:14 PM | Fire Over Ahwahnee: John Muir and the Decline of Yosemite
In July 1929 a frail, elderly woman quietly processed acorns on the floor of the Yosemite Valley. Her weather worn face appeared thin, yet firm like crumpled paper. She was a living record of the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:20 PM | Ice Bucket Challenge: Good for ALS, What About Your Health?
Sure, it raises money for ALS...but can a cold water dousing also boost your health?
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11:00 AM | Iranian Is First Woman to Win 'Nobel Prize of Maths'
An Iranian-born mathematician has become the first woman to win a prestigious Fields Medal, widely viewed as the Nobel Prize of mathematics.
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10:18 AM | DNews: How Stores Trick You into Buying More than You Need
Do you ever come out of a store with ONLY the purchases you planned to buy, before you went in? Here's how stores are fighting to keep that terrible thing from happening.
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7:54 AM | Supermoon
Taken on Sunday 10th August 2012 This blog posting is © copyright Emma Cooper 2014. Unauthorized duplication and/or republication is not permitted.
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7:10 AM | Some People Actually Want To Become Amputees
There is a psychological condition called body integrity identity disorder (BIID) which leads sufferers to believe that they have limbs which should not be there and that they would feel happier without them. Sufferers have been known to arrange accidents or undergo medical procedures in an attempt to fulfill their desire of becoming an amputee. There may also be a sexual component to the condition whereby the sufferer is aroused by the image of himself or herself as an amputee. The post Some […]

August 12, 2014

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12:59 PM | Why are the elderly invisible in archaeological contexts?
For the past two months, I have been busy preparing my dissertation data for analysis. This means that I am taking the paper versions of my data from books, monographs, […]
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11:30 AM | DNews: Reading Can Change Your Brain!
Scientists measured the short-term effects of reading using fMRI scans, and they found that reading actually changes your brain! What specifically happens? Trace is joined by Dr. Mike North to discuss their findings!
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