Posts

June 27, 2014

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7:00 AM | The Genetic Disorder That May Prevent Racism
Racial biases exist in all people of every age and every nationality; studies have shown that most of us start forming our racial biases before we even learn how to talk. Yet some children have absolutely no racial biases whatsoever---and those children have something called Williams syndrome. The syndrome, which isn't all about a lack of racism, is a genetic condition in which children are born with about 26 fewer genes than normal. Other characteristics associated with the condition include a […]

June 26, 2014

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6:00 PM | Everything You Need to Know About Sunscreen
Confusing labels can make a walk down the sunscreen aisle dizzying. We give you the lowdown.
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5:18 PM | New Interpretations from Old Books: Using Archives to Reassess Mortuary Sites
When we excavate an archaeological site, all of our paperwork, journals, interpretations, notes, maps, photos, and the artifacts and human remains are put into storage either at a country office, […]
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12:10 PM | The DNews Explainer: Does FIFA Run the World Cup Like a War Profiteer?
When you tote up the costs, in ways more than just financial, to a country that hosts the World Cup, it can make you wonder why any nation would want to. Trace examines the toll hosting the Cup can take on a country, and also who profits from it.
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10:00 AM | Scarred Girl Kicked out of KFC a Viral Media Hoax
The story of an injured young girl being asked to leave a fast-food restaurant has been called a hoax. But its viral spread says a lot about folklore and internet activism. Continue reading →
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9:00 AM | Smart as can bee; leafcutter bees, another example
A week or so ago we blogged about a paper on bee navigation and other aspects of animal behavior, and whether such behavior can be said to be evidence of 'intelligence'.  We mused about the word, and whether ideas about whether animals other than ourselves are 'intelligent' or 'sentient' or--the real big Prize, 'conscious'.  That post generated quite a lot of interest. It's perhaps a definitional issue, beautifully suited to endless debate and a guarantee of no […]
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8:40 AM | DNews: Your Phone is a Bacterial Playground
Texting, calling, gaming -- your smartphone does it all. Unfortunately, it's also a place where bacteria go to thrive, making the device your own personal microbiome.
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7:42 AM | The alien brains living on Earth
Where can you find exotic creatures with brains mostly inside their limbs? Jason G Goldman reveals the animals with arms that seem to have a mind of their own
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7:00 AM | The Incredible Journey Of An Eel
For Westerners, freshwater eels are a rather unappreciated fish and, if considered at all, are usually thought of as slimy bottom-dwellers that are better left alone. However, what many don't realize is that eels have incredibly interesting lives, which includes a total metamorphosis and an incredibly long migratory journey into the open ocean. The post The Incredible Journey Of An Eel appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

June 25, 2014

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9:00 PM | Neanderthals Ate Their Veggies, Oldest Poop Shows
A look at 50,000-year-old Neanderthal poop in Spain shows these early humans were omnivorous.
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6:18 PM | Ever wonder if you could get an implant of an ancient Roman tooth?
... because I spent hours thinking about this the other morning.  Fortunately, I met a dentist-turned-classicist and learned some random stuff.Etruscan bridge. See, I'm not thefirst to think of this!First up: Theoretically, could you implant an ancient Roman tooth in your jaw... you know, to screw with future bioarchaeologists?  According to the dentist (who shall remain nameless, because I don't need to drag him into my crazy) -- yes.  But the root would need to be coated in […]
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5:00 PM | DNews: Why Malnourished Children Might Never Recover
Worldwide, more than 20 million children suffer from malnutrition, and some of the effects of the ordeal are irreversible.
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4:31 PM | World Cup: Why Do Adults Bite?
Experts explain the psychology behind Uruguay forward Luis Suarez's aggressive behavior at the World Cup. Continue reading →
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3:30 PM | How Heat Kills
A combination of hot temperatures, high humidity and preexisting health conditions can make heat dangerous.
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3:08 PM | Student Blogging and Effective Teaching: Neuroanthropology in Action
Neuroanthropology and the Power of Student Blogging by Daniel H. Lende This spring, in my graduate class on Neuroanthropology, the students crafted excellent posts that brought together their own interests with the interdisciplinary approach at the heart of this new …The post Student Blogging and Effective Teaching: Neuroanthropology in Action appeared first on Neuroanthropology.
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2:29 PM | 9 Touching Epitaphs Ancient Greeks And Romans Wrote For Their Deceased Dogs
I saw this post/article on my facebook page and had to share it. it shows how much humans have valued their pet dogs and little has changed since the time of the Ancient Greeks. This link will take you to the original post but the title pretty much sums it up: 9 Touching Epitaphs Ancient Greeks […]
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9:00 AM | O, death, where is thy sting: the bees will continue to die
'Widespread impacts of neonicotinoids "impossible to deny,"' says the headline at the BBC.  The Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) of the effects of systemic pesticides, a report released on June 24, concludes that the fairly new pesticides, neonicotinoids (neonics) and fipronil, are as bad for ecosystems as was DDT.  The report was written by the IUCN, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, after a review of 800 peer-reviewed journal […]
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8:40 AM | DNews: How Come We're All So Bad at Flirting?
It turns out that not only are we bad AT flirting but we're also terrible at even noticing when we're being flirted WITH. So says a new study that looked at the sad state communication between flirters and flirtees. Trace has the details.
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7:59 AM | Sentidos
Esta anotación ha sido galardonada con un accésit en el concurso de promoción de la ciencia organizado por la revista Jot Down en la modalidad de divulgación científica. La neurología, la comprensión del funcionamiento del encéfalo y de sus trastornos, nunca fue tan sencilla como durante … Continue reading →
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7:00 AM | Native Americans Didn’t Always Use The Whole Bison
Native Americans are often revered for how in touch with nature they were. One of the things most often cited as evidence of this is how they would use every single part of every bison that they killed. In reality, many tribes engaged in extremely wasteful practices. Some Blackfoot, for example, would drive entire herds over cliffs and pick out the pieces they wanted to use from the pile at the bottom. The post Native Americans Didn’t Always Use The Whole Bison appeared first on […]
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6:10 AM | 50 insane facts about plants
Loving this infographic from Chadwicks :) For those of you without a magnifying glass, this is the link to their sources! This blog posting is © copyright Emma Cooper 2014. Unauthorized duplication and/or republication is not permitted.

June 24, 2014

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4:13 PM | One Grave Does Not Equal One Person: Hunter-gatherer Graves in Argentina
There seems to be an assumption that one grave will only hold one individual. Why we assume this is kind of strange given that even today we don’t always bury […]
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3:50 PM | Ebola 'Out of Control' in West Africa
The medical charity Doctors Without Borders reports that the scale of the epidemic is unprecedented.
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