Posts

October 24, 2014

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1:05 PM | First Ebola Case Hits New York
A doctor who recently returned to New York from treating Ebola patients in Guinea tests positive for the deadly virus.
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11:00 AM | The Science (and Non-Science) of the Ouija
Ouija, the mysterious oracle, has mystified many for decades, apparently contacting the dead. How does it work? Continue reading →
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7:00 AM | The Epic (And Wrong) Predictions Of Isaac Bickerstaff
In 1708, astrologer Isaac Bickerstaff predicted the death of one of London's preeminent almanac writers, John Partridge. On April 1, 1709, the announcement of his death was issued---but Partridge was alive and well. A back-and-forth ensued, with Bickerstaff insisting that he was dead, and Partridge insisting that he was alive. Bickerstaff was the more convincing of the two, and Partridge was ultimately driven out of the almanac business . . . by the pseudonym of one of the period's greatest […]
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5:47 AM | Week 26 Volunteering at The Royal College of Surgeons
So after a week away from the college I was back with the bones and getting my head around Aldlib. I wasn’t here last week as it was my birthday so my boyfriend and I celebrated by going to Thorpe Park. It was awesome! My first task the day was to update the Adlib entries […]

October 23, 2014

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9:00 PM | Oldest High-Altitude Settlement Found in Andes
Two ancient sites found high in the Peruvian Andes reveal humans have been living at extremely high altitude since at least 12,000 years ago.
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6:30 PM | The Ethics of Treating Ebola
Two experts on medical ethics address the most pressing Ebola ethical questions, from performing CPR to the use of medical placebos.
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6:10 PM | Who needs an osteologist? (Installment 19)
Welcome back to Who needs an osteologist?  Today, we have a special fantasy-chimera edition thanks to my husband, who was recently at GitHub HQ in San Francisco for an all-company meeting.  He snapped this picture of the "skeleton" of the famous GitHub Octocat:Felis octocatus skeleton at GitHub headquartersOctocat in the fleshThe sign below the display reads, "Octocat Skeleton. Felis octocatus.  This piece, which GitHub was lucky enough to receive from an anonymous donor, is the […]
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5:17 PM | DNews: Is Your Personality Affected by Your Birth Season?
A new study argues that the season in which your were born can help determine your personality and even significantly impact your risk of developing mood disorders.
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3:40 PM | Oppression, Mental Health, and the House Science Committee
By Steven Folmar, Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Anthropology, Wake Forest University      On September 15 of this year, I learned from my Program Officer at the National Science Foundation (NSF) that the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space … Continue reading »The post Oppression, Mental Health, and the House Science Committee appeared first on Neuroanthropology.
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1:00 PM | The Science Behind Renee Zellweger's New Face
The 45-year-old actress looked almost unrecognizable to fans who know her best from her earlier movies.
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12:50 PM | Ethiopia!
Ethiopia is in the news today, remembering the famine of 30 years ago. Rather than dwell on the past, I thought I would share this upbeat video from Perennial Plate – celebrating Ethiopia’s food culture: Ethiopia! from The Perennial Plate on Vimeo. The description of the video on Vimeo says “We travelled to Ethiopia for two weeks and filmed the making of injera, false banana and coffee as well as everything else we saw. Please watch, enjoy and visit this amazing […]
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9:28 AM | Islamofobie & Microaggressie – Komt een moslimvrouw bij…
Stelt u zich even voor. U bent moslim. En u belandt in de volgende situaties.
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9:00 AM | What is this 'risk variant' shared by 40% of people with Type 2 Diabetes?
I heard a surprising statistic the other day.  At least it was surprising to me.  The Oct 9 episode of the excellent BBC Radio 4 program "Inside Science" covered a new treatment for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The blurb about the segment said this:In 2010, a particular gene variant was associated with around 40% of Type 2 diabetics - not directly causal, but this so-called 'risk variant' increases the chance of developing the condition if you have the wrong lifestyle.The focus of the […]
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7:00 AM | The Strange Story Of Lord Minimus, Dwarf To King Charles I
Only 48 centimeters (19 in) tall, by all accounts perfectly proportioned, and the son of a man in the employ of the Duke of Buckingham, Jeffrey Hudson made his first court appearance when he was served to Charles I and his queen, Henrietta, in a pie. Quickly becoming a favorite of the queen, Jeffrey traveled with her on her trips between England and France, was captured by pirates more than once, lived for some time as a slave, and is said to have later served England as a spy. More about his […]

October 22, 2014

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6:56 PM | Roman Gladiators' (and a Gladiatrix's?) Diet
A press release is going around about a dietary analysis of Roman gladiator skeletons from Imperial-era Ephesos, headlined "Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of ashes after training."While I haven't had time to carefully and thoroughly dissect the publication, which came out last week in PLoS (Losch et al. 2014), it seems reasonably sound. The published C/N isotope ratios are totally in line with what we'd expect from the Roman diet--and also show the variation […]
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5:00 PM | 45,000-Year-Old Man Was Human-Neanderthal Mix
A Siberian man who was part human and part Neanderthal is shedding light on when Africans first successfully settled in Europe and Asia...and mated with Neanderthals who were already living there. Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | 'Hobbit Humans' Actually Might Not Have Been Human
The Hobbit Human descended from the more-ancient, pre-human group Australopithecus, argues one of the world's leading anthropologists. Continue reading →
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9:00 AM | Was John Snow more of an empiricist than the miasmatists?
If you know anything about epidemiology, you know that the iconic Broad Street pump in the Soho district of London is the site of what is considered to have been the first modern, epidemiological study.  This is where the man remembered as the first epidemiologist, John Snow, in the first empirical study of its kind, demonstrated that cholera is a waterborne disease.  Or at least that's the legend. John SnowThe story is well-known in the field of epidemiology, but also beautifully […]
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7:00 AM | Why Early Christians Revered Pontius Pilate As A Saint
Calling Pontius Pilate a saint would sound incongruous to modern Christian ears. How can this man, the Roman prefect who ordered Jesus to be flogged and handed him over to be crucified, be considered a saint? Yet, that was exactly how some early Christians viewed him---a Christian convert who was ultimately martyred for his faith. The post Why Early Christians Revered Pontius Pilate As A Saint appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

October 21, 2014

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9:39 PM | Urbanites Prefer Manly Men, Feminine Women
Preference for ultra-masculine men and ultra-feminine women is an urban habit, a new study suggests. Continue reading →
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7:31 PM | Death at sea: Syrian migrants film their perilous voyage to Europe
Read and watch the stories behind the statistics on the site of The Guardian: Moaaz, Majd, Rasha, Kinan and Khalid – who fled war-torn Syria to embark on a perilous trip to reach Europe.
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3:44 PM | Ebola Patients Generate 440 Gallons of Medical Waste Daily
Each Ebola patient produces a staggering amount of waste that includes everything from the oft mentioned bodily fluids to contaminated bed sheets. Continue reading →
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3:05 PM | Charlas Hablando de Ciencia en Málaga
Quedan pocas semanas para que la segunda edición de Desgranando Ciencia sea una realidad así que, para dar a conocer el proyecto entre el mayor número de personas y lograr una asistencia masiva al mismo —que es uno de los … Continue reading →
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1:45 PM | The Future of Cemeteries
If there is anything that we’ve learned from the past, its that there are a myriad of options for dealing with the deceased. The way the deceased are buried or […]
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9:41 AM | DNews: Drinking Alcohol Can Really Mess with Your Sperm
All it takes is one drink a week for sperm count and overall quality to be degraded, at least that's all it took in a study of 1,200 Danish soldiers. Ross Everett stops by to explain.
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9:13 AM | The Musician Inspired By Mushrooms
Vaclav Halek is inspired by mushrooms. (No, not in the way you’re thinking. ) This Czech composer claims every mushroom has its own unique song, and it just so happens that he has the ability to capture their mycological music. The post The Musician Inspired By Mushrooms appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.
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9:00 AM | And it's even worse for Big Data.....
Last week we pointed out that the history of technology enabled larger and more extensive and exhaustive enumeration of genomic variation, to apply to understanding the cause of human traits, important diseases or even normal variation like the recent stature paper.We basically noted that even the earlier, cruder methods such as 'linkage' and 'candidate gene' analysis did not differ logically in their approach as much as advocates of mega-studies often allege, but more importantly, all the […]

October 20, 2014

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5:18 PM | DNews: Healthy Food Three Times the Cost of Unhealthy Fare
A study out of the U.K. finds healthy food prices rising three times faster than less healthy foodstuff. Tara find out why it takes bigger bucks to dine well.
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5:11 PM | #TrueStoryASA Social Experiment: Exposing racial profiling
A revealing social experiment on racial profiling.
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3:30 PM | 'Oldest Parisian': Neanderthal Fossil Suggests Hunting Injury
One of three newly found prehistoric arm bones, likely from a Neanderthal, suggests that the individual had a muscle injury near the shoulder.
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