Posts

March 31, 2015

+
12:57 PM | Slightly More Boys Born Than Girls: Study
More boys may be born, but boys and girls are equal in number at conception. Continue reading →
+
2:32 AM | Bones - Season 10, Episode 11 (Review)
Welcome back, everyone, to the second half of this season's Bones.  The premiere happened while I was hanging out with real biological anthropologists at this year's American Association of Physical Anthropologists conference, so I didn't have time for my favorite fake anthropologist last Thursday.  I hope to get to the rest of the season's episodes in a timely manner, but I also have a real job so things might slide a little bit.  Without further ado, let's see if I remember how […]

March 30, 2015

+
5:00 PM | Can anthropology defeat self-deception to build better apps?
Last September, I participated in the relaunch of Ignite NYC. These mini-presentations test your game by only allowing you five minutes and 20 slides to share your idea with audience. It’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
5:00 PM | Can anthropology defeat self-deception to build better apps?
Last September, I participated in the relaunch of Ignite NYC. These mini-presentations test your game by only allowing you five minutes and 20 slides to share your idea with audience. It’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:58 PM | Optogenética: arrojando luz sobre la neurociencia
Esta entrada participa en la II edición del Carnaval de Neurociencias a segunda edición del carnaval de neurociencias nos plantea a los participantes hablar acerca del descubrimiento más importante en la historia de la neurociencia. Estarán de acuerdo conmigo en que … Sigue leyendo →
+
2:00 PM | Mental Illness Alone Can't Explain Germanwings Crash
Most people with mental health disorders do not hurt other people, studies show.
+
11:31 AM | Seeker Daily: The Rise and Fall of 'Japan's Beethoven'
On the surface, the story of 'Japan's Beethoven,' a deaf composer who created soaring works, was one of triumph over personal tragedy. The only problem is none of it was true.
+
9:00 AM | Antibiotic resistance
Ken and I just saw Michael Grazione's excellent, sobering film, Resistance, about the looming loss of antibiotics in the medicinal arsenal.  Bacteria that can make us very ill, and even kill us, are quickly, and unavoidably developing resistance to the chemicals that control them.  As Meryn McKenna writes in her excellent, also sobering piece, "Imaging the Post-Antibiotic Era", a world without antibiotics is going to look a lot like 1935; simple infections will become fatal once […]
+
7:00 AM | Is There Any Way To Reliably Count The Homeless?
To get federal funding or to determine if local programs to help the homeless are working, you need to know how many homeless people are in your area. But that's not an easy number to compute. In the US, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) sends "enumerators" into the streets to actually count the homeless in sample areas as a snapshot in time. London does something similar. Most other governments don't bother. The post Is There Any Way To Reliably Count The Homeless? […]
+
3:42 AM | Is email one of the last private spaces online?
Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account. Then she used my email address to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:42 AM | Is email one of the last private spaces online?
Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account. Then she used my email address to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 29, 2015

+
7:00 AM | The Rare, Salvaged History Of The Central Lunatic Asylum
Documents from the Central State Hospital in Virginia, established in 1870 as the Central Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane, have given researchers an incredibly rare and incredibly complete glimpse into the world of late 19th-century mental health care in the African-American community. Because hospital records were barely kept at the time---especially for African-Americans---the 800,000 documents are filling in a gaping hole in our history of mental health sciences. And some of the stories […]

March 28, 2015

+
3:16 PM | Vijf mythen over islamofobie deel 4: Islamofobie is niet dodelijk
Een zesdelige serie over de mythen over islamofobie. Ditmaal deel 4: Islamofobie is niet dodelijk.
+
7:00 AM | The Man Behind Your Favorite (Or Least Favorite) Fast Foods
Are you a fan of stuffed crust pizza? Do you start off each day with a sausage, egg, and cheese McGriddle? Well, then you need to thank Tom Ryan, the man who invented some of the planet's most popular (and hated) fast foods. The post The Man Behind Your Favorite (Or Least Favorite) Fast Foods appeared first on KnowledgeNuts.

March 27, 2015

+
5:39 PM | How to start your vegetable garden for less
Beautiful bounty needn’t be expensive At the moment I’m building a new garden from scratch, and as I’m putting in hard landscaping it’s taking some time (which is frustrating) and the project has a budget. This is in complete contrast to when I started my first garden, which started small, had no plan, and no budget to speak of. When you start a new vegetable patch, it’s easy to be bamboozled by all of the gardening products on the market, and to end up […]
+
3:45 PM | 10 Food Tricks That Fool Our Perception
People can be easily fooled by food, as these 10 tricks show.
+
7:00 AM | Science Has Decided Where Guinness Tastes Best
It's long been said that a pint of Guinness tastes better in Ireland than anywhere else in the world. Propaganda it might be, but according to a study published in the Journal of Food Science, it's true. According to the study, in which a team sampled pints in 103 different locations, the average rating of pint-drinking experiences while in Ireland were significantly higher than anywhere else in the world. The post Science Has Decided Where Guinness Tastes Best appeared first on […]

March 26, 2015

+
6:30 PM | The 'obstetric dilemma' hypothesis unraveled
Right now I'm giving this talk at the annual meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Here's the link to Session 15. Costly and Cute: How Helpless Newborns Made Us Human, where you'll see the participants, their talk titles and abstracts. This symposium evolved out of a seminar at the School for Advanced Research back in the summer of 2014 when I was very pregnant and on the cusp of facing my own obstetric dilemma.Let’s see how far we can unravel this […]
+
5:32 PM | DNews: Chronic Stress Makes a Mess of Your Body
It's safe to say we're all pretty up on the psychological hallmarks of stress -- the generalized freak-out state that makes mush of our minds. But what's going on inside our temples of high anxiety?
+
12:53 PM | Archaeology versus History
I was alerted to a blog post a few weeks ago with the (deliberately I'm sure) provocative title Archaeology is just an expensive way of finding out what historians already know... Of course I immediately felt the need to...actually I didn't. The post does have a point. Archaeology is indeed usually more expensive than historical research. I don't think the central criticism of the article is specific to archaeology. What is actually being complained about here is poorly designed research, […]
+
7:00 AM | The City Walls That Splash You Back
Maybe thermal imaging to identify drunks will take care of the problem someday, but until then, government officials in some cities are fed up with drunks (and sober people) engaging in public urination. Amsterdam has had free public urinals for decades, but there was a public backlash against open-air urinals in Gold Coast, Australia because of the locations and odor. However, Gold Coast is now considering the solution used in Hamburg, Germany: hydrophobic paint. Developed by Nissan as a water […]
+
2:23 AM | Twerking, limericks, and 3D printing: PbO at the 2015 AAPAs
This Saturday, from 9:15-10am, I'll be presenting (with my grad student, Andrea Acosta) a poster about teaching Human Osteology.  It's in a session called "Triumphs and Tribulations in Teaching," and it's sure to be a fun session and discussion (that part starts at 10:15).  I'm looking forward to visiting St. Louis for the first time, seeing lots of old friends, and making new ones.Here's an image of the poster we're presenting (click to embiggen). If you're desperate for a PDF, just […]

March 25, 2015

+
4:40 PM | DNews: Why Our Dreams Are So Hard to Remember
Often, we wake up certain of two things: 1. We slept, or at least we think we did; and 2. We had dreams. But DID we dream? Why does remembering our dreams feel a bit like trying to grab wisps of dissipating smoke?
+
2:48 PM | Seeker Daily: The Origins of the Game Monopoly
Monopoly began not with Charles Darrow during the Great Depression in 1934 but earlier, with a woman named Lizzie Magie, whose name, until recently, had largely been lost to history.
+
9:16 AM | Garden visit: Hestercombe
The view towards the restored mill Earlier in the month, Ryan and I took a short break in Somerset, spending two nights in Taunton. The weather wasn’t wonderful, but one of the days was dry (though overcast) and we decided to explore Hestercombe, a large garden that has been (and is being) restored. It boasted lakes, a restored mill, formal gardens, a restaurant, a plant shop and a secondhand book shop, so we were sold. We were feeling adventurous, so we took the long route around the […]
+
9:00 AM | An experience in informed consent
Half a century ago, a number of expeditions were taken by US, South American, and European scientists into the hinterlands of the Amazon rainforest.  Most or all of the tribal groups they visited were near Catholic mission stations, where there was a lot of interaction, or people were interacting in other ways with the colonizers of the continent.Napoleon Chagnon, then at the University of Michigan (and whom I knew as a graduate student and post-doc), with contributions from other […]
+
7:00 AM | How One Woman Rescued The Slinky From A Cult-ish Ending
Although Betty James came up with the toy's name in 1944, her husband, Richard James, is credited with inventing the Slinky, a toy spring that walked down stairs and delighted children. This simple toy became an incredible success, but Richard James didn't handle it well. He gave away large sums of money to questionable religious charities, then abandoned his wife and six children to join a cult in Bolivia. With the business in shambles and her family nearing bankruptcy, Betty James revived the […]

March 24, 2015

+
9:00 PM | Our Brains See Words as Pictures
Brain scans reveal how our neurons respond to words we've been trained to recognize -- as whole entities. Continue reading →
+
5:05 PM | DNews: Do Internet Friends Count as Real Friends?
How many people do you consider friends, even though you've never met them in person? More than zero, right? Such is life in the Internet age! But can such digital relationships be as satisfying as those we have with our more corporeal pals?
+
3:32 PM | Going down the Danube – Meso2015
Last week we received confirmation our abstract for a paper at the 9th International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe (Belgrade, sept 2015) has been excepted. The program is now online as well. See you in Belgrade! Late Mesolithic artefact … Continue reading →
12345
145 Results