Posts

March 24, 2015

+
9:33 PM | The interesting breakthroughs in memory, pain and agingAlso be...
The interesting breakthroughs in memory, pain and agingAlso be sure to check out an interactive look through Elizabeth Blackburn’s lab at UCSF here.
+
9:20 PM | In which life imitates science – number 264
A scientist is never off-duty, even in a fabulous Michelin-starred restaurant on Charlotte Street. I think pretty much anyone with a cell biology background would have seen what I saw in this rhubarb confection: But alas, my immediate dining companions … Continue reading →
+
6:41 PM | The Age of Plastics
Aberdeen University Marine Society’s President, Christina Nikolova, talks about plastic pollution in the oceans and offers some advice to reduce your plastic footprint. Today’s society is dependent on two things — oil and plastic. In fact, most of the plastic is made of oil. We can hardly imagine life without the either. Just look around…
+
6:00 PM | This is not just a post about Instagram
Early this year the Australian Prime Minister, who was under a bit of pressure about a questionable decision at the time, dismissed social media as ‘electronic graffiti’. People in my networks were outraged and, of course, took to social media to express their outrage. For a few days feelings were high, which resulted in a […]
+
5:47 PM | Are you practicing safe science?
Five weeks ago, I sliced through both tendons in left pinky. I was just about to start working in the lab, training my PhD student on the initial processing of a peat column from our Falkland Islands trip in December. We had bought a large serrated kitchen knife specifically to slice through 1 ft-square […]
+
5:20 PM | Congratulations to our March Advisor of the Month – Huiqin Gao
Many congratulations and thanks to Huiqin Gao, our March Advisor of the Month. Huiqin obtained her Bachelor’s degree at School of Information Management at Wuhan University (China), and is now a Master’s candidate majoring in Information Science in the same school. As well as studying, Huiqin is also the President of  the Information Literacy Association where she […]
+
4:55 PM | Page View Spikes on Research Articles
For those that know me as a biologist it might perhaps surprise you to know that my most cited publication so far is on Open Access and Altmetrics (published in April 2013, 25 cites and counting…) — nothing to do with biology per se! So I took great interest in this new publication: Wang, X., Liu, C., … Read more →
+
2:24 PM | How Common Core Serves White Folks a Sliver of the Black Experience
In this Feb. 12, 2015 photo, Marquez Allen, age 12, reads test questions on a laptop computer during in a trial run of a new state assessment test at Annapolis Middle School in Annapolis, Md. The new test, which is scheduled to go into use March 2, 2015, is linked to the Common Core standards, which Maryland adopted in 2010 under the federal No Child Left Behind law, and serves as criteria for students in math and reading. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky The sky hasn’t fallen and the […]
+
10:56 AM | Photonics has a new website!
After a bit of agonizing over style and how to actually accomplish it, our group now has a new website. It is still under construction but you can probably get a sense of the renewed vigor of the new website. You can get up-to-date information about the group, our research as well as our gimmicks. […]
+
10:51 AM | Communicating about lab finances
As I talked about in yesterday’s post, I’ve been thinking a lot about lab finances lately. For the most part, I’ve done this on my own, staring into what sometimes feels like an abyss of spreadsheets in my office. A … Continue reading →

March 23, 2015

+
11:37 PM | The Radial Velocity Method: Current and Future Prospects
Much of what we know today about exoplanets is due to the success of the radial velocity method. Where does it stand now? What is its future?
+
8:00 PM | The clothes don’t make the scientist
Those of you who saw my somewhat exasperated tweets last week know that I was reacting to this story on the Scientific American Voices Blog about how female scientists are portrayed in media coverage. (Answer: Superficially and with far too much attention to appearances).
Editor's Pick
+
7:18 PM | 3 Symptoms Of PhD Loneliness (And 5 Ways To Fix It)
PhD loneliness will hit you when you are working at midnight on some research topic nobody in your continent understands (or give a damn about) except for you. You are in a scientific micro-niche. So micro, you got nobody to talk with. And you feel alone. After all, you are born alone. You do a PhD […]
+
6:33 PM | Newer Studies Say Online Instruction Neither Harms Nor Benefits the Average University Student
More than 5 million college students took an online class during the 2013-14 school year (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin of a college student in a St. Mary’s College dormitory in Lexington Park, Md.) Does online learning work? Do college students learn better, or at least as well, from computer instruction as they do from a human teacher? That’s a question asked over and over again by not only students, parents and professors, but also by academic researchers. It’s […]
+
4:54 PM | Virginia Beach… Demolished.
What a race! BB and I ran the Virginia Beach Shamrock Half-marathon side by side, and we destroyed our previous personal record. We went from 2:14:44 to 2:05:03. A reduction of 9 minutes and 41 seconds. Or, essentially, more than a mile faster. Meaning, compared to our last half-marathon, we were finishing this one while […]
+
2:37 PM | Online Learning Goes the Distance
Over the past ten years, online education has become an increasingly mainstream part of the higher education landscape. Since 2002 – when roughly 1.6 million college students had taken at least one course online - enrollment in online education has more than tripled. Nearly three-fourths of all four-year colleges now offer online classes, including at elite schools, and the vast majority of public two-year colleges now offer online coursework as well. Casual observers may equate online […]
+
2:36 PM | Thinking vs. Doing
Currently in my PhD I’m looking at different methods and software for digitising my large spider dataset of many, high frame-rate videos. This was a step that was supposed to take about a week, exploring options before deciding on a … Continue reading →
+
1:20 PM | Meet the Cells of the Immune System
claimtoken-55144d7acb616 A couple of weeks ago I talked to you about my project. However, it was (rightly) pointed out that maybe I should introduce the parts of the project little by little. So let's start with the cells I work with. Mast Cell. Daisy Chung  © Rice University 2014First a quick introduction. Our immune system (IS) includes not only cells, but also tissues and molecules that allow the system to recognize and respond to disease from the common cold (a viral infection) to […]
+
12:00 PM | The more things change, the more they change
I just had the pleasure of spending a couple days hiking around the interior of Catalina Island. The last time I did this was about 23 years ago, when I was a student on an undergraduate field trip for a course in Conservation Biology. I learned a lot from that course, and a lot of…
+
11:35 AM | New on F1000Research – 23 March 2015
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article Guiding Ebola patients to suitable health facilities: an SMS-based approach [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/51l] Mohamad-Ali Trad, Raja Jurdak, Rajib Rana “We propose building a [...]
+
10:53 AM | Keeping track of lab finances
Recently, I’ve spent a lot of time working through lab finances. I need to make personnel decisions, and what I want to do is: Make sure the amount of money I think I have to spend is the amount I … Continue reading →
+
4:00 AM | Reproducibility - do you have what it takes?
Reproducibility is supposed to be a cornerstone of modern science, in that everything we do (writing methods, almost releasing data, the whole peer-review system) is supposed to ensure that, given only your paper, some hypothetical person can reproduce your results without having to look for additional information. It's the way I've first been told about scientific literature. It's also a blatant lie, and it's only getting worse. First, and although I'm yet to try it for myself (this would be […]

March 22, 2015

+
11:50 PM | Is the medium a monster?
“Dinosaurs have become boring. They’re a cliché. They’re overexposed” – Stephen Jay Gould Dinosaurs have always been inextricably linked to popular culture. Despite going extinct 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous period they pervade our society. Dinosaur exhibits are the main attractions of natural history museums and outside of this setting, they can be found in films, documentaries, books, toy shops etc. A new discovery of […]
+
7:00 PM | PRIMES Dominates High School Research
The 2015 Intel Science Talent Search results are out. This year they divided the prizes into three categories: basic research, global good, and innovation. All three top prizes in basic research were awarded to our PRIMES students: First place: Noah Golowich, Resolving a Conjecture on Degree of Regularity, with some Novel Structural Results Second place: […]
+
6:58 PM | Puzzling Grades
I lead recitations for a Linear Algebra class at MIT. Sometimes my students are disappointed with their grades. The grades are based on the final score, which is calculated by the following formula: 15% for homework, 15% for each of the three midterms, and 40% for the final. After all the scores are calculated, we […]
+
3:13 PM | Possibly pedantic points: scientific names
When it comes to certain things, I am a pedant. Not the annoying beat-you-over-the-head type of pedant, but the type that has been known to geek out over methods for reporting taxonomic authorities (it’s all in the parentheses). This weekend, … Continue reading →
+
10:52 AM | Can Neuroscience Teach Us About Winemaking?
Modern winemakers may have erred when they switched to producing high alcohol wines. According to a new paper, from Spanish neuroscientists Ram Frost and colleagues, a low alcohol content wine actually produces more brain activity in 'taste processing' areas than more alcoholic varieties do. But what does the brain really have to say about Beaujolais? Can scanning help us pick a Sauvignon? Will neuroimaging reveal the secret to a good... er... Nero d'Avola? In their paper, publishe

Frost R, Quiñones I, Veldhuizen M, Alava JI, Small D & Carreiras M (2015). What Can the Brain Teach Us about Winemaking? An fMRI Study of Alcohol Level Preferences., PloS one, 10 (3) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25785844

Citation

March 21, 2015

+
2:00 PM | Check your tweets
It’s no secret that the information we share on social media can get us in trouble. You can embarrass yourself, ruin your reputation, and even get arrested using fewer than 140 characters. Tweets are also reflections of a person’s current state – they shed light on things we find interesting, the events in our lives, and […]

March 20, 2015

+
10:19 PM | Can Monkeys Get Depressed?
According to a new study from Chinese neuroscientists Fan Xu and colleagues, some monkeys can experience depression in a similar way to humans. The researchers studied cynomolgus monkeys, also known as crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis), a species native to Southeast Asia. Cynomolgus monkeys are highly social animals. Xu et al. previously showed that isolating a monkey from its companions caused it to develop depression-like behaviors. In their new paper, the authors say that they'v

Xu F, Wu Q, Xie L, Gong W, Zhang J, Zheng P, Zhou Q, Ji Y, Wang T, Li X & Fang L (2015). Macaques exhibit a naturally-occurring depression similar to humans., Scientific reports, 5 9220. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25783476

Citation
+
9:35 PM | Why Full-Day Kindergarten is a Key Piece of the Early Ed Puzzle
In recent years, early education has been on federal and state policymakers’ radar more than ever before. The Obama Administration has introduced several early learning initiatives, from Preschool Development Grants and Race to the Top- Early Learning Challenge, to the ambitious Preschool for All proposal. Meanwhile, a growing number of red and blue states across the country are taking the initiative to pilot and expand public pre-k programs for four-year-olds without the help of the […]
123456789
274 Results