Posts

January 21, 2015

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9:11 PM | Life in the domes: a counterculture spirit thrives Although...
Life in the domes: a counterculture spirit thrives Although plenty of campuses offer specialized housing — often reserved for vegans, teetotalers, athletes and other like-minded souls — it is probably safe to say that there is no place quite like the Domes, an early venture into sustainable living at the University of California, Davis. The complex of 14 tiny domes is officially named Baggins End, after the Tolkien characters. Opened in 1972 and designed by a contractor, the Domes […]
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9:00 PM | Today in Bad Marketing Campaigns, a College without “College”
Those of us who follow higher education know that if one thing is constant in higher education it’s the effort colleges make to “rebrand” themselves, as more selective, more Christian, more artistic, or the ever-popular “more prestigious.” American colleges are, compared to the rest of the world, mostly pretty new. Some of this is understandable because so many institutions are really still figuring out what they want to be. But it turns out this sort of behavior […]
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5:53 PM | OYM62: Sexy Single Cells
    Our hosts have lived very different lives this week, with Liam getting knocked off his feet by a virus and Kat ramping up the next phase of her project.  While Liam was in bed with his backlog of movies to watch, Kat’s been pulling late nights and weekends to try and finish designing ...read more The post OYM62: Sexy Single Cells appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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5:49 PM | Leading a discussion of a scientific paper
I’m teaching a graduate class in Entomology this term, and part of that class involves students leading discussions about scientific papers in our discipline. These discussions are typically between 60 and 90 minutes, with a small group (4-6 individuals). This post provides some advice and guidelines around how to go about doing this. That being […]
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5:30 PM | Ocean Life Faces Mass Extinction, Broad Study Says A team of...
Ocean Life Faces Mass Extinction, Broad Study Says A team of scientists, in a groundbreaking analysis of data from hundreds of sources, has concluded that humans are on the verge of causing unprecedented damage to the oceans and the animals living in them. “We may be sitting on a precipice of a major extinction event,” said Douglas J. McCauley, an ecologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an author of the new research, which was published on Thursday in the […]
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3:21 PM | First example of nanopore sequencing being used for applications in human genomics
Today, we are very pleased to highlight some exciting new data with regards to genome sequencing. We have just published a short research paper from the Bader lab at the University of Toronto providing the first public example of the Oxford MinION nanopore sequencer being evaluated for utility in the clinic. For [...]
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2:52 PM | Getting the most of mix models with random slopes
I use mix models as a way to find general patterns integrating different levels of information (i.e. the random effects). Sometimes you only want to focus on the general effects, but others the variation among levels is also of interest. … Continue reading →
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2:10 PM | KinSync – Getting documents from Mendeley to your Kindle with no wires and no fuss
Q&A with Aaron Asaro, KinSync Founder  So, in a nutshell, what is KinSync? KinSync is a webapp, built on top of the Mendeley API, which automatically sends documents from your Mendeley account to your Kindle e-reader. It aims to “Get documents from your Mendeley account to your Kindle. No wires. No fuss.” How was the […]
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11:02 AM | Suggest topics and participants for the debate at the 2016 ASN meeting in Asilomar! (UPDATED)
Last year the American Society of Naturalists (ASN) held a very successful Oxford-style debate at its meeting in Asilomar, on the determinants of continental-scale patterns in diversity. In the comments on the linked post, Dan Bolnick, an organizer for the … Continue reading →

January 20, 2015

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11:58 PM | How Diederik Stapel Became A Science Fraud
Two years ago, Dutch science fraudster Diederik Stapel published a book, Ontsporing ("Derailment"), describing how he became one of the world's leading social psychologists, before falling from grace when it emerged that he'd fabricated the data in dozens of papers. Stapel wrote Ontsporing in Dutch, but now his story has been translated into English, under the title of Faking Science - thanks to the efforts of Nick Brown. Neuroskeptic readers may remember Brown for his critical analyses o
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11:28 PM | Fact-Checking and the CUNY-Atlantic Debacle
On Tuesday last week the Atlantic published an article highlighting changes at the City University of New York, a college system that, in the view of the authors, was increasingly bifurcated. Wealthier white and Asian students tended to go to the top CUNY colleges, and poorer black and Hispanics tended to be relegated to the less selective community colleges run by the system. As a result, according to the original headline, “…High Achievers Have No Place To Go.” And then it […]
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10:10 PM | Temporary tattoo measures glucose without a needle Scientists...
Temporary tattoo measures glucose without a needle Scientists from the University of California, San Diego have developed an easy-to-wear, temporary tattoo that can accurately measure glucose levels in the skin, allowing diabetics to monitor their levels without a finger prick test. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells. This first-ever example of the […]
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7:19 PM | Why Carrots Taste Sweeter In Winter UCLA’s Liz...
Why Carrots Taste Sweeter In Winter UCLA’s Liz Roth-Johnson explains why carrots have more sugar when it’s cold outside. Because plants are immobile, they must develop defense techniques against predators and the severe cold in winter. For example, carrots have developed the physiological response of increasing their sugar content when it’s cold outside. This helps stop ice crystal formations and prevents damage to the carrot’s cells. Frost can do a lot of damage to a […]
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4:16 PM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: Helen Huang
Meet Helen Huang, a biomedical engineer whose work aims to improve the quality of life of people with physical disabilities.
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3:20 PM | At Education Week: Connect Children to the Classroom Early
Last week, Education Week released its annual Quality Counts report. This year, the report includes an expansive focus on early education: “Preparing to Launch: Early Childhood’s Academic Countdown.” It’s worth checking out. As part of the release, I wrote a commentary in response to this question posed by Education Week: What’s a research concern that we still need answered about early-childhood education? I say that while there has been a great deal of research […]
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2:06 PM | Just Tell Them You Can Do It.
Saturday night, BB and I went out to dinner with a person I work with and his wife. We went to a cozy little French restaurant and really enjoyed it. I had the venison. It was a good decision. The four of us enjoyed a wide-ranging conversation over three hours. BB and I both have […]
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1:16 PM | Changing course, Part 3: Open exploration
Previously biochembelle started taking a look at what she had to offer the professional world. Now the question was, where did she want to go? I had spent a long time focusing on others – their needs, their expectations, their … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Why I’m a little sour on crowdfunding
Here’s an idea for a new way to fund science: We can just create websites about our projects, and then ask taxpayers to vote for competing research proposals, based on which ones they see on social media. I didn’t say it was a good idea. This is, essentially, what crowdfunding is. I know (and also internet-know) a…
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11:57 AM | Do gender and imposter syndrome influence where scientists submit their manuscripts?
A recent conversation with a colleague got me wondering: do men and women differ in whether they are more likely to submit work to “top” journals? More specifically: are men more likely to stretch with a submission, and women more … Continue reading →
Editor's Pick

January 19, 2015

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9:12 PM | "Education and social class are two of the research topics I am most interested in as a sociologist...."
“Education and social class are two of the research topics I am most interested in as a sociologist. Our hope with this book was to shine a light on the experiences of underprivileged students at large public universities, and I’m proud to have contributed to the understanding of such an important issue.” - Laura Hamilton, UC Merced sociologist. Coauthored by Elizabeth A. Armstrong, “Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality” follows a group of 53 […]
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8:23 PM | Pillow basalts at Point Bonita
It's amazing how quickly I'm capable of abandoning my blogging resolutions, really. Here we are, a couple of weeks into the new year and I've failed to a) post more often and b) talk about my research. (I swear I have a post in the works about that, but it's gotten long and unwieldy and in desperate need of editing!) But this weekend I'm going to keep a couple of the other resolutions, and blog about the trip I took yesterday to the Marin Headlands.
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5:45 PM | In 1965, about a month after his historic march from Selma to...
In 1965, about a month after his historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech at UCLA about allowing African Americans to play a greater role in determining their own political destiny and sharing in the country’s prosperity. "I have faith in the future because I know somehow that, although the arc of the universe is long, it bends toward justice." While King’s soaring speech became part of campus lore, it was only recently […]
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4:59 PM | Scientific Meetings and Advocacy: same place, different events?
Name: Bruno da Rocha-Azevedo* Conventional wisdom says that scientific confe...
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3:17 PM | New on F1000Research – 19 January 2015
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article Shaping the Future of Research: a perspective from junior scientists [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4yc] Gary S. McDowell, Kearney T. W. Gunsalus, Drew C. MacKellar, Sarah [...]
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3:14 PM | Three Lessons From Data on the Best Ways to Give Feedback to Students
Proponents of computerized instruction often point out that software can give instant feedback to students. And that helps students learn more. That’s why a personal tutor can be so powerful. He or she can immediately react when there’s a misunderstanding and provide an explanation or a hint. But the truth is, educators don’t really understand how a teacher’s feedback leads to learning and exactly what kinds of feedback work best. A team of researchers led by Fabienne […]
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3:09 PM | How We Can Pay Tribute to Mothers of Slain Children on Martin Luther King Jr. Day
They say, “A mother’s work is never done.” Depressingly, the work referenced in this motto can be that of social justice. As new leadership emerges in highflying cases of injustice, mothers of slain unarmed black men and boys have become primary teachers of the prevention of racial bias and discrimination. The mothers of Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and an unrecognized number speak with unequivocal clarity as to who and what kill our children. As Sybrina […]
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8:47 AM | Pathway to PhD: should I do a masters degree or an internship?
With deadlines looming for attractive PhD scholarships such as the Irish Research Council, current undergraduates often realise that the path to a PhD is somewhat opaque, with many different ways to get there. Finding a PhD is something we have covered already, but a question I often get asked is: do I need a MSc or can I go straight in, or what about an internship? There is nothing stopping you going straight into a PhD from your undergraduate degree, but it can be difficult to be competitive […]
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8:00 AM | Goal Setting for a New Year
I used to belong to a women’s group where each January, the leader of the group would pass around a bowl of cardboard angels cut out from old Christmas cards. On the back of each colorful angel was a single … Continue reading → The post Goal Setting for a New Year appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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2:30 AM | discoverynews: Vemödalen: The Fear That Everything Has Already...
discoverynews: Vemödalen: The Fear That Everything Has Already Been Done
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12:34 AM | Conspiracy deathmatch
I realized recently that, in the best tradition of fighting fire with fire, it’s possible to counter some conspiracy theories by invoking other conspiracy theories. The best two examples I’ve come up with so far are as follows: The anti-vaccination … Continue reading →
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