Posts

August 27, 2014

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5:01 PM | Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers...
Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find Violent protests can often be unintentionally provoked by aggressive law enforcement tactics like approaching demonstrators in riot gear or the use of military-style formations, according to a team of researchers at UC Berkeley. "Everything starts to turn bad when you see a police officer come out of an SUV and he’s carrying an AR-15," said Nick Adams, a sociologist and fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute for Data Science who […]
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2:37 PM | The hardest part of a professor's job
Professor. It's a term used to cover a wide swath of job in the US, from people who strictly teach undergraduates to soft money researchers. The spectrum of people, jobs, situations and career options makes the title a grab-bag of many things. At each end of the spectrum you have jobs that are nearly, if […]
Editor's Pick
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1:18 PM | Co-Chaperone Keeps Close Watch on Mice Sperm Production
Chaperones aren't just for high-school homecoming dances. Cells have chaperones as well, chaperone proteins that ensure newly made proteins are properly folded. If protein folding goes awry, diseases associated with misfolded proteins such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can arise. But if one set of chaperones can throw a wet blanket on a school dance, imagine a second set of co-chaperones just to keep the chaperones in check. That's the growing picture in cellular chaperoning as folding […]

Rogon, C., Ulbricht, A., Hesse, M., Alberti, S., Vijayaraj, P., Best, D., Adams, I., Magin, T., Fleischmann, B. & Hohfeld, J. & (2014). HSP70-binding protein HSPBP1 regulates chaperone expression at a posttranslational level and is essential for spermatogenesis, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25 (15) 2260-2271. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-02-0742

Alberti S, Böhse K, Arndt V, Schmitz A, Höhfeld J. (2004). The Cochaperone HspBP1 Inhibits the CHIP Ubiquitin Ligase and Stimulates the Maturation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 15 (9) 4003-4010. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E04-04-0293

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12:00 PM | It’s nice to have administrators you can trust
Last week, our campus had its back-to-school events. Our administrators talked about their big plans. There was one Thing that the President talked about for a few minutes. The Provost talked about the same Thing for a half hour. My Dean talked about It for about twenty minutes. When I had lunch next to my…
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11:46 AM | Is there any way to avoid having to write all-new assignments every term for the classes I teach?
Ok readers, I give you plenty of advice, so now it’s payback time! :-) I need your help, with a problem I suspect many of you have: is there any good way to avoid writing all-new assignments every term for … Continue reading →
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10:22 AM | Congrats August Advisor of the Month — Vicky Pyne!
Congratulations and thank you to Vicky Pyne! Vicky recently participated in a video for our Women in STEM series (you can see these stories on our YouTube channel, including some of our own Mendeley employees), and we loved her passion for the topic, both as a medical student and someone with a decade of experience of […]
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6:58 AM | OYM 46: 1200 BRAINS *drops mic*
This week in grad school: This week the gang meets up in person again and catches up on the craziness of the last week, including our mysterious vanishing episode. Adel is starting of get some much needed perspective on his trials with graduating, and he’s realized that it’s time to take responsibility for this experience ...read more The post OYM 46: 1200 BRAINS *drops mic* appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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1:00 AM | Laureate Fellowship
I received the exciting news last week that I have been awarded a Laureate Research Fellowship from the Australian Research Council. I flew to Adelaide on Friday for the Awards Ceremony, which was held at St Peter's College in Adelaide. This was an impressive venue, looking like it had been teleported through time from the 19th century.  I also learnt that St Peter's has more Nobel Prize winning graduates (3) than any secondary school outside of New York.I'm now the proud owner of an […]

August 26, 2014

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10:23 PM | I'd Rather Black, Superhuman Student-Athletes Just Be Human
What happens when prep athletes take off their uniforms? The same black males who are beloved heroes on schools’ playing fields can be treated as violent trespassers off of them. Between being a celebrated superhero and a profligate thug, black students just need to be seen - as human. Last week, Jackie Robinson West became the first all black Little League team to win the American title and to advance to Little League World Series. My heart raced like my sons played on Jackie Robinson […]
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10:18 PM | Lessons from Hawaii: Tracking the Right Data to Fix Absenteeism
Good school attendance is associated with all sorts of good educational outcomes, especially higher grades and higher test scores. It’s obvious: if you’re not showing up for school, you’re not going to learn as much. But only 17 states track and report chronic absenteeism data, according to the Data Quality Campaign and Attendance Works, a non-profit organization that advocates for more focus on absenteeism data and ideas for getting students to come to […]
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10:15 PM | The Tensions Between Pre-K Politics and Research
With the federal government rancorously gridlocked for the last four years, some folks have taken to a familiar—and understandable—way of expressing their frustration. Why, they ask, can’t politicians just “listen to the research?” Why must every policy argument descend into ideological bickering when we already know what works? We especially hear this a lot in the early education world. The tension between democracy and expertise is a longstanding theme. […]
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10:14 PM | New Article on arxiv on Equitability and MIC
We recently put on arxiv a new draft on "Theoretical Foundations of Equitability and the Maximal Information Coefficient".  This is some follow-on work to a paper that appeared in Science a couple of years ago, where we introduced the idea of equitability.  Essentially, in that Science paper (link to page where you can access the paper), we wanted a statistic that would give back, for samples from a noisy functional relationship, a score corresponding to the amount of noise (or, […]
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5:30 PM | UC Berkeley’s Early Warning System Beat Napa Earthquake by...
UC Berkeley’s Early Warning System Beat Napa Earthquake by 10 Seconds Ten seconds before the San Francisco Bay Area started shaking early Sunday morning, an experimental system in a UC Berkeley lab sounded an alarm, counting down to the impending earthquake. The system works through an array of sensors near the fault line which calculate the severity of the quake and broadcast a warning. It might not seem like much, but even a few seconds notice could allow utilities to shut off gas […]
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2:14 PM | Homeland.
Saturday, I’m taking my partner and heading to St. Louis. It will be the first time I’ve been back since I moved to ECC. I am really looking forward to visiting. First, I get to introduce my girlfriend to my best friends. People I spent 20 years building friendships with, and then suddenly abandoned when […]
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1:32 PM | New on F1000Research – 26 August 2014
A day later due to the UK bank holiday, but here is this week’s selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article: An evolutionarily significant unicellular strategy in response to starvation stress in Dictyostelium social amoebae. [...]
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10:20 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like at NC State: Joel Ducoste
Engineering professor Joel Ducoste, who works to keep drinking water clean and safe, describes how his lifelong passion for discovery has fueled his research around the world.
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8:54 AM | 25 years of ecology – what’s changed?
I am giving/gave a talk this morning at a Festschrift celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Graduate Ecology program at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), the large state university in one of the larger states/cities in Brazil. So … Continue reading →

August 25, 2014

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6:30 PM | How to Cure Hiccups Hiccups are usually harmless, but quite...
How to Cure Hiccups Hiccups are usually harmless, but quite annoying. They occur when the vagus nerve, which runs from the brain to the abdomen, is irritated through digestive disturbances. George Triadafilopoulos, M.D., a gastroenterologist and associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Davis, explains that the home remedies used to stop a hiccup work on two main principles: over stimulating the vagus nerve, and interfering with breathing. Sweeten The Hiccups Mary […]
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4:26 PM | How One Ohio Mother is Trying to Take Down Common Core
CINCINNATI - The several hundred people that filled the sanctuary of Faith Christian Fellowship Church on the outskirts of Cincinnati on a Monday evening in July murmured their indignation as Heidi Huber blasted a book that taught that homosexuality was normal. The book wouldn’t be important except it had popped up on a Catholic school association’s website as an example of what elementary school students might read under the Common Core State Standards. “We are arming the […]
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3:19 PM | The Strange Rise and Fall of a Medical Journal
For almost a year, I’ve been blogging about two strange organizations from the world of science, Publication Integrity and Ethics (PIE) and Open Access Publishing London (OAPL). This story went quiet for a while, but now it’s back, with the publication of an extraordinary document called: Evidence-based analysis: The rise and fall of Head and […]The post The Strange Rise and Fall of a Medical Journal appeared first on Neuroskeptic.
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2:49 PM | GBBF 2014
This year’s Great British Beer Festival was held from 12-16 August at Kensington Olympia, and as in recent years I attended for 3 days from the Tuesday to the Thursday, including the Tuesday trade session. The festival was well-organised, and once again the volunteers did a great job. Last year I didn’t have time to […]
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2:20 PM | Repost: Don't waste at least 270 people's time
We're coming up on another job season and, like always, I'm seeing tons of jobs requesting Letters of reference up front. This is stupid and wastes a huge number of people's time. It really needs to stop. I posted this last year, but my views haven't changed. Once again my department is putting together a […]
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2:00 PM | Lessons learned as a first-year faculty member
By Sarah Bisbing As I prepare to start my second year as an Assistant Professor, I’ve been thinking quite a bit about the highs and lows of my first year, the successful changes I made over that year, and my … Continue reading →
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1:28 PM | A Lot of College Students Are Living with Their Parents. That's Normal.
According to a piece in Forbes, more college students are now living at home while in college. This might sound a little depressing, for those of us who had the traditional dorm-frat-apartment college living experience, but it’s maybe not so important. What does this mean? Well, probably not much. The story explains that: More than half of college students (54%) chose to live at home to make school more affordable, according to Sallie Mae’s most recentHow America Pays for […]
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12:31 PM | Feedback.
I need pretty constant feedback. And I need it to be good. What drives me most is people telling me I’m doing well. This charges me to continue to meet their expectations. If I get bad reviews, I feel angry and betrayed and insulted. Then I feel lost and bewildered. Then I get bogged down […]
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12:00 PM | History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member)
By Sarah Bisbing I survived my first year as a faculty member. In fact, I think I even did pretty well if I consider my student evals and the number of end-of-year hugs received. I’m going to pat myself on the back. Why? Because being a first-year faculty member (or really an any-year faculty member,…
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12:00 PM | Links Roundup #22
Apps for Academics Crystal pointed me to the site Smallwow Best Apps for Academics.  Created by Nicole Hennig, it is a companion for the 2014 book Best Apps for Academics by Hennig and Pam Nicholas.  Smallwow gets a big wow … Continue reading → The post Links Roundup #22 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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11:57 AM | The truth about Islamic State that no one wants to hear
Today’s post is one of obligation rather than enjoyment. It needs saying, but it won’t be popular. It’s about Islamic State, ISIS, ISIL or however we’re currently translating what they call themselves: the repellent gang of criminals currently terrorising large swathes of the Middle East. Not that the Western media would care half as much […]
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11:04 AM | Brief book reviews: The Science of the Struggle for Existence, Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, and Why Do Lemmings Commit Suicide?
This post is an experiment. It’s brief reviews of three older books that I think will be of interest to many of you, but that I suspect many of you weren’t aware of. My goal is to say just enough … Continue reading →
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11:04 AM | Brief book reviews: The Science of the Struggle for Existence, Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, and Why Do Lemmings Commit Suicide? (UPDATED)
This post is an experiment. It’s brief reviews of three older books that I think will be of interest to many of you, but that I suspect many of you weren’t aware of. My goal is to say just enough … Continue reading →
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