Posts

June 30, 2014

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1:26 PM | Why the Ecology Letters editorial board should reconsider it’s No vote on preprints
As I’ve argued here, and in PLOS Biology, preprints are important. They accelerate the scientific dialog, improve the quality of published research, and provide both a fair mechanism for establishing precedence and an opportunity for early-career researchers to quickly demonstrate the importance of their research. And I’m certainly not the only one who thinks this: […]
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12:30 PM | How can you show off your data?
When your research data is no longer of use to you, And your career goals are moving you on, Before you abandon your data, Stop a while, consider, could that be wrong?   Your data took effort to produce Calibrating equipment, reagents and so on Not to mention the hours spent looking at spreadsheets Just [...]
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11:24 AM | Steven Frank on how to explain biological patterns (UPDATED)
The very smart Steven Frank has an unusual and thought-provoking new paper out on “generative models vs. underlying symmetries to explain biological pattern“. As with several of his recent papers, it’s really applied philosophy. Steven Frank has some very deep … Continue reading →
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11:24 AM | Steven Frank on how to explain biological patterns
The very smart Steven Frank has an unusual and thought-provoking new paper out on “generative models vs. underlying symmetries to explain biological pattern“. As with several of his recent papers, it’s really applied philosophy. Steven Frank has some very deep … Continue reading →
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10:46 AM | “Education is the most powerful weapon”: Congratulations June Advisor of the Month!
Congratulations and thank you to Nour Daoud! Nour is a recent graduate from the Illinois Institute of Technology and part of IIE’s Syrian Research Consortium, which Mendeley supports. She studied Computer Science and Communication for four years in Syria, before transferring to IIT and studying Electrical Engineering. Nour interned at Goldman Sachs in summer 2013, and will begin […]

June 29, 2014

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10:38 PM | Discipline-Specific Tools: Digital Humanities 3: History
This is the third and last, at least for now, post in my series of tools for the digital humanities (DH).  I continue to have the two problems I mentioned in my last post, of there being too many good … Continue reading → The post Discipline-Specific Tools: Digital Humanities 3: History appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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4:37 PM | Gauging Public Support for Education Spending
I attended First Focus’ annual Children’s Budget Summit this week to hear about the latest federal budget trendlines affecting programs that serve children. The accompanying report is full of interesting information on the United States’ budget priorities. Across all programs, inflation-adjusted federal spending on children declined by 13.6 percent from 2010 to 2014. Education is down 15.1 percent, and early childhood spending 6.2 percent over the same time period. These are […]
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3:34 PM | My Ancestry
I always wanted to be a person of the world. I wanted my genes to be a mixture of everything. I was glad that I had a great-grandfather from Poland and a great-great-great-grandmother from France. I was also thrilled when my mom told me that her Asian students think she is [...]
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10:36 AM | Another Education Neuromyth Debunked
What does neuroscience have to say about the educational value of lectures? Not much, says pedagogist Ken Masters in a lively article just published in Medical Teacher: Nipping an education myth in the bud: Poh’s brain activity during lectures Masters lays into an emerging slice of neurononsense. The claim is that neuroscientists have shown that, […]The post Another Education Neuromyth Debunked appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Masters, K. (2014). Nipping an education myth in the bud: Poh’s brain activity during lectures, Medical Teacher, 1-4. DOI: 10.3109/0142159X.2014.916785

Citation
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8:10 AM | Women are underrepresented in big NSERC awards
Back in April, as I was knee-deep in a trans-Atlantic move, Meg Duffy wrote a post at Dynamic Ecology on the US National Science Foundation’s Waterman Award (a prize for an under-35 scientist/engineer of $1 million), and lamented that the last 11 recipients were men.  The comments on that piece were particularly excellent, and included […]
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5:41 AM | Another Foursquare workround
In my last post I mentioned that the latest update to the Android Foursquare app forces you to check-in using Swarm. The main problem with this is that you don’t always get points. I thought about this, and wondered about uninstalling Swarm to see if that would get Foursquare checking in back. Yesterday I tried […]

June 28, 2014

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4:00 AM | Preprints, and the issue of (misplaced) trust
Yesterday, a bunch of people (and I) were discussing what type of contributions to list in your CV when you are looking for a job. Papers that are in press, and accepted clearly belong here, but the discussion revolved around preprints quite fast. I suggested to include them, and I got generally negative feedback: (???) (???) (???) if you have an acceptance letter from an editor, sure put it on there. otherwise, no. #inmyworld — Hope Jahren ((???)) June 27, 2014 Most of the discussion […]

June 27, 2014

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10:32 PM | Quotes from Chemistry...Part 9!
“We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or to describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn't any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work”.                    -Richard Feynman, in his 1965 Nobel speechThis is a matter that […]
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6:27 PM | How Fixing Corporate Welfare Might Kill Many For-Profit Schools
Corinthian Colleges, one of the largest for-profit education companies in the United States (it has some 72,000 students), is in trouble. That's because the corporation makes its money though what is basically welfare. According to an article in the Los Angeles Times: Santa Ana-based Corinthian has been investigated by the U.S. Department of Education, state attorneys general and other federal regulators for years. The company is accused of falsifying job placement rates and misleading […]
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4:10 PM | The Crimson Alkemist and Patreon
So I know there are a few readers out there that are fans of what I've been writing, and I've been introduced recently to a service called Patreon recently. It offers the ability for fans of a creator's work to donate to their cause instead of polluting a webpage with tons of ads.Crimson Alkemist is a labor of love aside from research, but I'd like to be able to contribute a lot more quality material while no longer pillaging (or pillaging less) from Google Images for my posts. I could use […]
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3:30 PM | Publishing quickly and often with an Observation Article – an interview with Andrew Baird
At F1000Research we are constantly pushing the boundary of what defines a research article. Authors can submit descriptions of unexpected, novel, and possibly unexplained observations in the form of Observation Articles. These observations can be a phenomena that has been identified in field work, in the laboratory or through experimental analysis. We recently published Prof. Andrew Baird’s [...]
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2:27 PM | Report: Federal Special Ed Dollars Not Always Fairly Distributed
This week, the U.S. Department of Education announced a new framework to hold states accountable for the IDEA dollars they spend. But my new report, released today, asks a different question: How well is the IDEA funding formula even distributing that money to states and districts? The federal government’s second-largest PreK-12 program spends $11.5 billion a year on special education grants to states — and those dollars aren’t always being distributed all that wisely, we […]
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1:40 PM | Friday links: a botanical brainteaser, hippos as invasive species, tau > pi, 2>55, and more (UPDATED)
Also this week: twitter as a chatty officemate, important questions in ecology that (apparently) have no answers, the post-publication review/witch hunt lottery, is your PI out to get you, population ecology vs. the British government, and more. From Meg: Last … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Recommended reads #30
The EEB & Flow has provided a spot-on flowchart to help you produce the ultimate introduction to your next ecological manuscript. How exactly did you prepare for a conference presentation before the powerpoint era? What the heck do you put into a slide carousel? Check out the comments on the post about conferences from last week. A…
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12:00 PM | ISRF 2014 in Odense, Denmark
5 future scientists: 4 from the Institute of Medical Sciences and 1 from the Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health; 4 women and 1 man; 3 Italians and 2 Scots; cancer, eye development and disease, autism aetiology and cartilage defects. These are the statistics about the PhD students representing the University of Aberdeen for the…
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11:37 AM | Happy second birthday to us!
Happy second birthday to us! Some highlights of the last 12 months, in no particular order (warning: pure navel gazing and own-horn-tooting follows) Our audience continues to grow with no obvious sign of slowing down, though I’m sure it will … Continue reading →
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10:03 AM | Open Science News – 27 June 2014
This week’s news from the open science world:  In Canada, a public discussion about open science has kicked off as part of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2.0 Consultation. Canadians can leave their own comments to join the discussion. If you’re in Melbourne, Australia, and interested in finding out more about open science, [...]
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8:57 AM | A glance into crystallisation
Macroscopic systems such as hard micrometer beads can undergo crystallisation in a way similar to atoms in our conventional crystals. The larger size means that we can observe the crystallisation process under the microscope, and be mesmerised by it: As a technical note, after some time you can see how the crystal self-heal its defects […]
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2:56 AM | Scales of progress
I’m feeling lately like I’m not doing “enough” with my time, as though I’m caught in a rut emotionally and mentally in my off hours. Work is great. I love the new job – the day-to-day tasks and the bigger … Continue reading →

June 26, 2014

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8:31 PM | Common Core: The Tetherball of Gubernatorial Politics
Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal wants to make the state the fourth, including Indiana, Oklahoma and South Carolina, to turn back Common Core implementation. Jindal adopted Common Core state standards, which put him in line with other presidential hopefuls like Jeb Bush, four years earlier. Since Common Core has become the litmus test for conservatism, Jindal’s retreat apparently increases his presidential profile. What about the test for children? Click to read more columns. Common Core […]
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8:09 PM | Strange Compulsions.
I’m a huge fan of international soccer, and I’m thrilled today that the USA has advanced into the knockout stages, probably to play Belgium. A fine squad, and formidable challenge. We’ll have our work cut out for us. I hope we stand tall, win or lose, and acquit ourselves well. Today I wanted to write […]
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7:00 PM | California's State Colleges Aren't Even Affordable for Middle Class Families Anymore
California’s new financial aid policy will now, for the first time, offer scholarships to middle class students. Under previous policy, scholarships were available only to the state’s low-income students. The children of the state’s lawyers or dentists had to pay the full price. Perhaps the fact the state schools now have to offer financial aid to middle income people should strike us as cause for concern. Under the new policy, according to a piece in the Los Angeles […]
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6:38 PM | Well-rounded Students – What does it Take?
WS Gilbert thought it was ‘comical…that every boy and every gal… is either a little Liberal or else a little Conservative’ in the words expressed by that bored sentry PC Willis. The politics would be different now, but we in … Continue reading →
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5:23 PM | A hovercraft that rides like a motorcycle With what looks like a...
A hovercraft that rides like a motorcycle With what looks like a Speeder Bike from Star Wars, UCLA alum and aerospace engineer Mark DeRoche has developed a new type of hovercraft known as The Aero-X.  When onboard the rider feels like they’re driving a motorcycle. The idea was to build a vehicle that could quickly glide over rough terrain. Your cruising speed could top out at 45mph at 10 feet off the ground on this thing.  DeRoche says it could be used by farmers, […]
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4:51 PM | No Averages
Here is an old Olympiad problem: Prove that you can choose 2k numbers from the set {1, 2, 3, …, 3k−1} in such a way that the chosen set contains no averages of any two of its elements. a2a_linkname="No Averages"; a2a_linkurl="http://blog.tanyakhovanova.com/?p=504"; [...]
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