Posts

October 02, 2014

+
4:16 PM | Helping Disadvantaged People Succeed in College Doesn't Have a Damn Thing to Do with Admissions
What can we do to help more disadvantaged students attend and succeed in college? This has been a question behind many education policy reforms of the last half century. This is why we have affirmative action in admissions. This is why we have community colleges, the work-study program, and federally-backed student loans and grants. This is even, arguably, why we have online and for-profit colleges. But, according to a new piece from the New America Foundation, we’re doing it wrong. […]
Editor's Pick
+
3:13 PM | Get credit for your reviews: Publons
This posts look like an advertisement, but it is not. I don’t even know who is behind this initiative, but reviewing is an important part of my job, and I think we should get better credit*. Now I can get some credit … Continue reading →
+
1:45 PM | Contribution to Science!
Hurrah, haroo! I have had a paper accepted! It felt like it was never going to happen again. This is an exciting one for me because it is the first (and probably only) paper from my little tiny grant that I got shortly after arriving at MECMC. That grant paid for two interns for a […]
+
1:36 PM | UK Airports and Airport hotels: deficiencies in amenities
I was prompted to write this post having just returned from a holiday in Greece which included staying in an airport hotel at London Gatwick (twice) and spending some considerable time in 2 airports (the other being Thessaloniki). The first point I wanted to make is on the familiar theme of WiFi provision. I regard […]
+
11:05 AM | Interpreting ANOVA interactions and model selection: a summary of current practices and some recommendations
There is tremendous variation in ecology in how ANOVAs are interpreted, and in terms of whether model selection is used. This post, which represents the first attempt Brian, Jeremy, and I make at a joint post, is aimed at exploring … Continue reading →
+
2:49 AM | Pharmacy School is the New Law School
For many years that I worked at the Monthly I rather enjoyed covering the demise of the law school. Law school was the go-to professional option for reasonably ambitious but ill-focused college graduates. It offered the promise of making good money to think. And then the economy collapsed. In the aftermath of the great recession all of these highly indebted law school graduates floundered in the job market. No longer were there lots of law firms interested in hiring them for lucrative careers. […]

October 01, 2014

+
9:38 PM | The Winners of the $5K, $3K, $1K Kaluza Prizes Are…
Eleanor (Josie) Clowney , a postdoc at Rockefeller University who did her graduate work at the University of California, San Francisco, has been named the winner of the 2014 $5,000 ASCB Kaluza Prize for outstanding research by a graduate student. The Kaluza Prizes are supported by Beckman Coulter. Clowney won for her breakthrough work on olfactory neurons performed in Stavros Lomvardas’ lab. Her work provides a new perspective on how acute transcriptional specificity can be achieved […]
+
5:55 PM | EUMETSAT Conference 2014: Final highlights
The EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellites Conference 2014 featured a lot of new science. Two particular points which stood out to me was the assimilation of new products into numerical weather forecasting systems, and the use of satellite data in improving our … Continue reading →
+
5:12 PM | Why are human faces so unique? What’s in a face? The...
Why are human faces so unique? What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley. Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify […]
+
4:58 PM | Our People—Five ASCB Members to Receive BRAIN Grants
NIH announced Tuesday the recipients of the first round of research grants toward understanding the brain as part of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. $46 million in funds was awarded to over 100 investigators who proposed developing new technologies to accelerate neuroscience research. The $46 million from the NIH is part of a larger $300 million public-private effort by the Obama Administration to revolutionize our understanding of […]
+
11:26 AM | Using our posts as course material? Please tell us just so we know.
We’re aware of a number of courses at college and universities around the world that have used our posts as course material. But I suspect there are many more we don’t know about. We like to know about this just … Continue reading →
+
7:16 AM | What has nature ever done for us?
Anti-environmentalists and apathists often ask why bother to conserve nature – what does it do for us? Cue enthusiastic green arm-waving and heavy sighs from environmental scientists and ecologists who have faced this attitude their entire careers. Nature is undeniably important for the human race – we wouldn’t be here without plants fixing the sun’s energy into carbohydrates and producing oxygen as a by-product, we wouldn’t be able to grow any food to eat without […]
+
6:29 AM | Labguru Steps up to the Plate
Though Jeter is no longer stepping up to the plate, we're just getting started. In close consultation with customers including Victoria Yoon from Gladstone's Huang Lab and Alexander Chamessian from Duke's Ji Lab we've rolled out the ability to add a plate element to your protocol and experiment layouts. You may select the plate size, and quickly define the contents of each well. Here's a short video to see it in action:Well, well, well. Researchers may now easily and intuitively define the […]

September 30, 2014

+
8:56 PM | IPC4 Day 1 – Death is the road to awe
Following on from the previous post, the afternoon symposium was all about the applications and implications of vertebrate taphonomy. Matt Carrano kicked things off with a great talk on how microfossil bonebeds help to guide our understanding of terrestrial palaeoecosystems. Using sites from the well-known but poorly understood Cloverly Formation, he provided a key insight […]
+
5:19 PM | "The government pays twice for obesity: first for the corn subsidy (to make high-fructose corn..."
“The government pays twice for obesity: first for the corn subsidy (to make high-fructose corn syrup), and then for emergency room heart attacks and health care.” - UCSF’s Robert Lustig talking about how the United States needs to shift its policy on regulating sugar content in foods.
+
5:00 PM | Tenure track position at #UMichEEB in ecology or evolution of fishes or birds
Come join me at Michigan! We are doing a search for someone working on the ecology or evolution of fishes or birds. Here’s the ad: The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (www.lsa.umich.edu/eeb) and the Program in the Environment (www.lsa.umich.edu/pite) … Continue reading →
+
3:33 PM | Rare Disease Tweetchat summary
Our latest #F1000Talks tweetchat, about rare disease research, was a great success. We heard from researchers, patient advocates, and others, got everyone’s thoughts on the Ice Bucket Challenge, saw new collaborations and ideas form on the spot, and learned that the best incentive for data sharing is….cake.   Follow along with the tweets below, [...]
+
1:12 PM | Professional Advancement.
The foundations of my empire at MECMC are beginning to be laid. I have been here now for about 18 months. After two consecutive good performance reviews, I am being promoted. It’s not a major promotion in terms of my job, from an institutional perspective. But it’s a big deal to me. I was asked to […]
+
12:53 PM | IPC4 Day 1 – Using the past to inform the present
Welcome to the fourth International Palaeontology Congress! 900 palaeontologists have piled into the land of steak, sun, and malbec in Mendoza, Argentina, for the biggest palaeontology conference that draws from all parts of the field. What I want to do with these posts is just provide snapshot summaries of the talks I’ve been at to […]
+
12:45 PM | Institutional pride
Last night I asked a question on twitter about whether PIs felt some specific allegiance to their institution and I got some interesting responses. My thought was simply that many of us may feel ties to our department or even one's specific college, but I was trying to get at what it takes to extend […]
+
12:00 PM | Invasive species, immigrant emotions and a guilty conscience
I have a confession to make: I live in Sweden and I have lupines in my garden. I didn’t plant them, they were there when I moved in, but after two seasons I haven’t removed them either. In Sweden, I see escaped lupines along roadsides and although I’m not sure how much of a problem…
+
10:31 AM | The Root(worm) of the Problem: Unexpected Obstacles on the Road to Research
Scientists often have to spend an enormous amount of time becoming experts in things outside their field of study in order to do research they think is important. This is where a corn-eating beetle and a guy named Clay Chu come in.
Editor's Pick

September 29, 2014

+
10:48 PM | ucresearch: Building a better cup of coffee The brave new world...
ucresearch: Building a better cup of coffee The brave new world of coffee? Think genetics. UC Davis geneticist Juan Medrano is known for his research on the genetics of milk (and the effect it has on humans), but recently has turned his research efforts towards coffee. The goal is to understand the variability of coffee genes at the DNA level. This would allow Medrano and others to accurately identify genetic forces that contribute to certain flavors as well as the crucial factor of disease […]
+
9:15 PM | The silly logic that congress has about climate change You may...
The silly logic that congress has about climate change You may have already seen the full segment on The Daily Show (you should if you haven’t) where John Stewart critiques a recent hearing held by the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology. It echoes a commencement speech that President Obama gave last spring at UC Irvine: Today’s Congress is full of folks who stubbornly and automatically reject the scientific evidence about climate change.  They […]
+
4:22 PM | Ernest Lab Ph.D opening at University of Florida
So here it is, the first of the positions we’ll be advertizing as part of our move to the University of Florida. The official ad is below, but a few comments first. The position is for a student to work with me, but for those who aren’t really familiar with our groups, it’s important to […]
+
2:11 PM | Obsession in Sobriety.
Alcoholism is a disease of obsessions. It’s a disease of many things. I guess what I really mean is, “I’m about to talk about obsessions in alcoholism.” Because alcoholism is also a disease of isolation, of depression, etc.. It’s impossible to lay alcoholism at the feet of any one descriptor. But one powerful characteristic that […]
+
12:51 PM | New on F1000Research – 29 September 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article: Electrical maturation of neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/42n] Michael Telias, Menahem Segal, Ben-Yosef Dalit Researchers at Tel Aviv University developed [...]
+
12:00 PM | Let’s stop mixing up education and social capital
When people talk about the “value of a quality education,” they’re probably not talking about education. What does a “quality” education look like? It’s expensive. The money doesn’t really get you a better education. It gets you social capital. Expensive schools trumpet the “value” of an education. At expensive liberal arts colleges, any public assembly could turn…
+
11:47 AM | They’re just not that into you: the no-excuses truth to understanding proposal reviews (guest post)
Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post from Peter Adler. ********************************* We’ve all been outraged by the nit-picky, irrelevant, or downright wrong-headed criticisms that show up in proposal reviews. How could they have rejected the proposal because they didn’t … Continue reading →
+
11:00 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: Makita Phillips
Makita Phillips talks about her research into insulators for use with superconductors.
345678
224 Results