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Posts

March 27, 2014

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3:37 PM | Meet the Mendeley Web Team
Continuing our series of introducing each of the Mendeley teams, it’s time to meet the Mendeley Web team. At it’s most simplest description, the web team is responsible for the Mendeley website–making sure it functions correctly and allows for the networking and groups collaborations that happen online. But, just as Mendeley is about working collaboratively, […]
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3:12 PM | GIS in R: Part 1
I messed around with R for years without really learning how to use it properly. I think it’s because I could always throw my hands up when the going got tough and run back and cling the skirts of Excel or JMP or Systat. I finally learned how to use R when I needed to […]
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1:27 PM | When is it Worth Being Mad?
The following tweet showed up in my timeline, and I was immediately captivated: How do you know when something is worth being mad about? — Nikki (@AuroraBirdialis) March 27, 2014 This is a brilliant question, in the first place simply for being asked. So many of us, like me for about the first 30 years […]
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12:00 PM | Smarten up
Here’s a simple explanation for how many addictions work: you consume a chemical compound–through ingestion, inhalation, whatever–that looks or works a lot like another compound that’s naturally present in your body. The naturally occurring, or “endogenous,” compound happens to be one that binds to their specific receptor in your brain that triggers a whole downstream […]
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11:48 AM | Book review: Community Ecology by Gary Mittelbach, and Community Ecology by Peter Morin
As a graduate student, I had the privilege of taking Peter Morin’s Community Dynamics course. In 1999, Peter published a textbook based on his course. It was very successful; as of 2011, Community Ecology is now in its second edition. … Continue reading →
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11:31 AM | Pollinator contribution to yield quality (and my preprint experience)
I already shared a preprint and post about this paper some time ago, but now is officially peer reviewed and online. You can download the final version here: https://peerj.com/articles/328/ My experience with preprints? The publication process at ThePeerJ was super fast (~ 3 months … Continue reading →
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4:12 AM | Selfie
No summary available for this post.
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3:37 AM | The Absurdity of Ranking Colleges by Graduate Salaries
Jordan Weissman has moved from the Atlantic, and is now covering economics at Slate. He has a post up provocatively titled (it is Slate, after all) “What College Will Leave you Poorest?” which covers the Payscale college salary rankings, in which … Continue reading →
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2:21 AM | Questions?
A group of geeky colleagues assembled in the lobby after work last night and headed down to Vancouver’s Railway Club bar for Café Scientifique. This monthly science outreach event encompasses talks about everything from biodiversity to genomics to chemistry to … Continue reading →

March 26, 2014

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10:45 PM | The Ugly Ducklings of Science
A group of management researchers provide new evidence of a worrying bias in the scientific process – The Chrysalis Effect: How Ugly Initial Results Metamorphosize Into Beautiful Articles ( via Retraction Watch ) The issue they highlight – the ability of researchers to eventually squeeze support for a theory out of initially negative data – […]The post The Ugly Ducklings of Science appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

O'Boyle, E., Banks, G. & Gonzalez-Mule, E. (2014). The Chrysalis Effect: How Ugly Initial Results Metamorphosize Into Beautiful Articles, Journal of Management, DOI:

Citation
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8:40 PM | Work? What a silly idea
A study making headlines today in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology suggests that having a mentally demanding job before you retire is associated (in about 4000 Americans) with “higher levels of cognitive functioning before retirement, and a slower rate of cognitive decline after retirement”. Use it or lose it, in short. And who wants […]
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5:31 PM | A Powerful Eye into Deep Space The Thirty Meter Telescope...
A Powerful Eye into Deep Space The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) —which has been spearheaded by UC and the California Institute of Technology since 2003— will be built and run by a consortium of universities and scientific organizations from around the world.  Special adaptive optics will correct for the blurring of Earth’s atmosphere, enabling the TMT to study the universe as clearly as if the telescope were in space (In fact, it has 12 times the resolution of the […]
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5:11 PM | Interested in becoming a contributor ?
One of my goals when I started this blog was to develop an interactive site where grad students, postdoc and researchers in cerebrovascular physiology could discuss published papers, study designs and methods related to this research area. Now, it would be really interesting if grad students, postdoc and researchers following this blog could contribute with […]
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4:55 PM | The Good Words—Bench Bloggers
Supposedly, 200 million people are out there blogging. Unsurprisingly, many of them are working scientists, some are even cell biologists. It's one of the encouraging features of the evolving science writing ecosystem that scientists can write directly about their lives and their work. Some scientists use their blogs as podiums, some as pulpits, and some as stand-up mikes for riffs on the day-to-day research world of dirty glassware, shaky funding, and bad behavior. Illustration by […]
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4:45 PM | Another research theme on brain physiology at Frontiers !
Regular readers know that we have a research topic on cerebral oxygenation at Frontiers in Physiology. For those interested in brain physiology during exercise, this journal has a research theme covering that issue (Topic Editors: Stephane Perrey, Montpellier I University, France, Sebastien Racinais, Aspetar, Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Qatar, Olivier GIRARD, ASPETAR – […]
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4:43 PM | Living on the Edge of Equilibrium
Last week my bike got a puncture. So what, you might ask. In itself this is totally trivial, but it also represents the way the trivial gets in the way of everything else. A puncture for me represents potential disaster. … Continue reading →
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2:15 PM | Silence in the Garden.
Shortly after my divorce I began going to a Pragmatic Buddhism meditation group. I only went a few times, but it was very interesting. Pragmatic Buddhism, as it was described to me, means taking the philosophical elements and rituals of Buddhist practice, but it strips away the supernatural things. No gods or magic or prayer […]
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12:48 PM | Meet our March Advisor of the Month!
Congratulations and thank you to Othman Talib! Othman became an Advisor just last month after letting us know about the hundreds of seminars he was teaching all across Malaysia since 2011. How Othman managed to stay under our radar for a long time…we don’t know how, but we are sure glad to know him now! […]
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12:03 PM | Policy relevant science – life on the boundary
I have had a couple of posts so far on what I perceive as a how-to-guide on doing policy relevant science (an overview and a piece emphasizing why contrary to popular opinion universities are actually a good base for doing policy-relevant … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Why I prefer anonymous peer reviews
Nowadays, I rarely sign my reviews. In general, I think it’s best if reviews are anonymous.  This is my opinion as an author, as a reviewer, and as an editor. What are my reasons? Anonymous reviews might promote better science, facilitate a more even paying field, and protect junior scientists. The freedom to sign reviews without […]
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5:54 AM | OYM 27: Stressing out with Joe Makkerh
It’s been a very exciting few days for the OYM team!  Its official, Adel’s going to be a doctor….God help us.  But in all seriousness, we’re very excited for him and highly condone spamming his Facebook and/or Twitter accounts with your congratulations. And we’ve got more news!  Instead of reviewing a paper, we’re talking with ...read moreThe post OYM 27: Stressing out with Joe Makkerh appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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3:05 AM | Bama Totally OK With That Big Racism in its Greek System
The University of Alabama, in an astounding display of cultural insensitivity, has decided it has no business reforming the Greek system despite the fact that it still seems to maintain essentially segregated fraternities and sororities. According to an article in the Crimson White, the student newspaper at the University of Alabama: At the final session of the 2013-14 SGA Senate, a proposed resolution in support for full integration of the University of Alabama Greek system was sent to […]

March 25, 2014

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8:52 PM | Anatamogenic
When Crox Minor and I visited the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons recently, I bought a copy of The Knife Man, by Wendy Moore, a biography of John Hunter, whose collection forms the nucleus of this remarkable … Continue reading →
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7:27 PM | The ultimate interactive experience
Newly appointed Northeastern professor Stacy Marsella is a rockstar in computer science. He develops crazy algorithms that essentially read emotion in snippets of text or audio. He’s put these skilz to use in a variety of platforms, from health applications to virtual reality games (stay tuned for my story on this work in the news@Northeastern). […]
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5:17 PM | The Frog of War When biologist Tyrone Hayes discovered that a...
Photo: Annie Tritt Photo: Annie TrittThe Frog of War When biologist Tyrone Hayes discovered that a top-selling herbicide messes with sex hormones, its manufacturer went into battle mode: In 2001, seven years after joining the biology faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, Tyrone Hayes stopped talking about his research with people he didn’t trust. He instructed the students in his lab, where he was raising three thousand frogs, to hang up the phone if they heard a click, a […]
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4:27 PM | Grit and Galton; Is psychological research into traits inherently problematic?
Is all psychological research on individual differences racist? Can psychologists ever separate our shameful past of scientific racism from the methods, techniques and questions that have grown from it? A recent post criticizing the concept of “grit” (and Angela Duckworth, … Continue reading →
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3:39 PM | Vacation Wrap-Up: Korea.
I didn’t really begin to scratch the surface of what Japan was like in the previous post. Everyone was friendly, but from what I’d describe as a professional distance. In Japan, people didn’t volunteer to help us. But if we asked, they helped without reservation, though seeming slightly startled, as though being asked for help […]
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2:37 PM | The Myth of the Myth of the Science and Engineering Shortage
Given how crowded policy commentary is these days, with blogs, articles, e-books, and the like, the surest way to break through and get attention is to write the “man bites dog story.” And that is exactly what we have seen with the issue of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and skills. While the evidence shows that the United States is not producing enough STEM workers, a cottage industry of STEM shortage naysayers has emerged. Most recently, Michael […]
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2:30 PM | Teaching a new language in a course, when the language is not the focus of the course
Like many computer science departments, the languages we teach our students vary over time. When I was hired, we taught Java in Intro and C++ in Data Structures (our CS 2 course). The year I started, we moved to teaching Java in both Intro and Data Structures. (Thank god, because my C++ was pretty rusty […]
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1:14 PM | In which satellite models trump circumspection: the case of MH370
The strange disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH340 has captivated the world, myself included. In an era of instant information, it’s sobering that an entire Boeing 777 could just vanish. I am sure I am not the only one who … Continue reading →
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