Posts

August 26, 2014

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10:20 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like at NC State: Joel Ducoste
Engineering professor Joel Ducoste, who works to keep drinking water clean and safe, describes how his lifelong passion for discovery has fueled his research around the world.
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8:54 AM | 25 years of ecology – what’s changed?
I am giving/gave a talk this morning at a Festschrift celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Graduate Ecology program at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), the large state university in one of the larger states/cities in Brazil. So … Continue reading →

August 25, 2014

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6:30 PM | How to Cure Hiccups Hiccups are usually harmless, but quite...
How to Cure Hiccups Hiccups are usually harmless, but quite annoying. They occur when the vagus nerve, which runs from the brain to the abdomen, is irritated through digestive disturbances. George Triadafilopoulos, M.D., a gastroenterologist and associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Davis, explains that the home remedies used to stop a hiccup work on two main principles: over stimulating the vagus nerve, and interfering with breathing. Sweeten The Hiccups Mary […]
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4:26 PM | How One Ohio Mother is Trying to Take Down Common Core
CINCINNATI - The several hundred people that filled the sanctuary of Faith Christian Fellowship Church on the outskirts of Cincinnati on a Monday evening in July murmured their indignation as Heidi Huber blasted a book that taught that homosexuality was normal. The book wouldn’t be important except it had popped up on a Catholic school association’s website as an example of what elementary school students might read under the Common Core State Standards. “We are arming the […]
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3:19 PM | The Strange Rise and Fall of a Medical Journal
For almost a year, I’ve been blogging about two strange organizations from the world of science, Publication Integrity and Ethics (PIE) and Open Access Publishing London (OAPL). This story went quiet for a while, but now it’s back, with the publication of an extraordinary document called: Evidence-based analysis: The rise and fall of Head and […]The post The Strange Rise and Fall of a Medical Journal appeared first on Neuroskeptic.
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2:49 PM | GBBF 2014
This year’s Great British Beer Festival was held from 12-16 August at Kensington Olympia, and as in recent years I attended for 3 days from the Tuesday to the Thursday, including the Tuesday trade session. The festival was well-organised, and once again the volunteers did a great job. Last year I didn’t have time to […]
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2:20 PM | Repost: Don't waste at least 270 people's time
We're coming up on another job season and, like always, I'm seeing tons of jobs requesting Letters of reference up front. This is stupid and wastes a huge number of people's time. It really needs to stop. I posted this last year, but my views haven't changed. Once again my department is putting together a […]
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2:00 PM | Lessons learned as a first-year faculty member
By Sarah Bisbing As I prepare to start my second year as an Assistant Professor, I’ve been thinking quite a bit about the highs and lows of my first year, the successful changes I made over that year, and my … Continue reading →
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1:28 PM | A Lot of College Students Are Living with Their Parents. That's Normal.
According to a piece in Forbes, more college students are now living at home while in college. This might sound a little depressing, for those of us who had the traditional dorm-frat-apartment college living experience, but it’s maybe not so important. What does this mean? Well, probably not much. The story explains that: More than half of college students (54%) chose to live at home to make school more affordable, according to Sallie Mae’s most recentHow America Pays for […]
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12:31 PM | Feedback.
I need pretty constant feedback. And I need it to be good. What drives me most is people telling me I’m doing well. This charges me to continue to meet their expectations. If I get bad reviews, I feel angry and betrayed and insulted. Then I feel lost and bewildered. Then I get bogged down […]
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12:00 PM | History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member)
By Sarah Bisbing I survived my first year as a faculty member. In fact, I think I even did pretty well if I consider my student evals and the number of end-of-year hugs received. I’m going to pat myself on the back. Why? Because being a first-year faculty member (or really an any-year faculty member,…
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12:00 PM | Links Roundup #22
Apps for Academics Crystal pointed me to the site Smallwow Best Apps for Academics.  Created by Nicole Hennig, it is a companion for the 2014 book Best Apps for Academics by Hennig and Pam Nicholas.  Smallwow gets a big wow … Continue reading → The post Links Roundup #22 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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11:57 AM | The truth about Islamic State that no one wants to hear
Today’s post is one of obligation rather than enjoyment. It needs saying, but it won’t be popular. It’s about Islamic State, ISIS, ISIL or however we’re currently translating what they call themselves: the repellent gang of criminals currently terrorising large swathes of the Middle East. Not that the Western media would care half as much […]
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11:04 AM | Brief book reviews: The Science of the Struggle for Existence, Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, and Why Do Lemmings Commit Suicide?
This post is an experiment. It’s brief reviews of three older books that I think will be of interest to many of you, but that I suspect many of you weren’t aware of. My goal is to say just enough … Continue reading →
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11:04 AM | Brief book reviews: The Science of the Struggle for Existence, Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, and Why Do Lemmings Commit Suicide? (UPDATED)
This post is an experiment. It’s brief reviews of three older books that I think will be of interest to many of you, but that I suspect many of you weren’t aware of. My goal is to say just enough … Continue reading →

August 24, 2014

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3:56 PM | Culling the deskcrops
If you saw my post for the Geological Society's "Speaking of Geoscience" blog, you'll know that I'm in a transition period - finishing up my job as a policy fellow and getting ready to move on to a postdoctoral fellowship with the USGS in September. In the meantime, that means I've been spending a lot of my time packing all my possessions into increasing numbers of boxes, in between pecking away at various writing projects.
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1:21 PM | The Scottish independence referendum and concerns for the future
In 4 weeks time the Scottish independence referendum will have taken place, and at present the outcome is still unpredictable. I find myself in a difficult place with respect to the referendum. Most of all, I wish it wasn’t taking place at all. But it is, and I am trying to avoid all the hype […]

August 23, 2014

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3:17 PM | Is the ACM "Retaliating" Against SOCG?
Friday afternoon Jeff Erickson posted at Making SOCG blog some "bad news".  Some background:  very recently, the Symposium on Computational Geometry, or SoCG, decided to leave the ACM, for various reasons.  There had been plans in the works for SoCG to be co-located with the Symposium on the Theory of Computing, or STOC, one of the flagship general theory conferences, in 2016.  STOC is an ACM conference.  Reportedly, Paul Beame, chair of SIGACT (the ACM theory special […]
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3:48 AM | Elucidating missing links of the TCR signaling network
Just published:Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling. LA Chylek, V Akimov, J Dengjel,  KTG Rigbolt, WS Hlavacek, B Blagoev. PLOS ONE 9, e104240Stimulation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) can trigger a cascade of biochemical signaling events with far-reaching consequences for the T cell, including changes in gene regulation and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. A driving force in the initiation of signaling is phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of […]

August 22, 2014

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9:04 PM | End of summer musings on (lack of) rejuvenation and (too much) service
Summer is supposed to be a season of rejuvenation for academics. While research and service obligations remain, we get a break from teaching. Theoretically, since teaching is the major part of my job, this should mean that my summer schedule is (a) more low key, (b) more relaxing, (c) less time consuming, and (d) less […]
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7:18 PM | The Society for Neuroscience receiving both barrels
Apologies for the third post about open access publishing in a row. Normal service will resume shortly! I wanted to bring attention to a second open letter published, inspired by our first one to the Association for the Advancement of American Science (AAAS). This letter was aimed at a smaller society, the Society for Neuroscience, and […]
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6:16 PM | "When you look at the sunflowers you planted six weeks ago and they now dwarf you, it puts all the..."
“When you look at the sunflowers you planted six weeks ago and they now dwarf you, it puts all the intellectual parts of your learning in a pretty real-world frame of reference — you can see growth visibly come to life, and it’s really satisfying.” - UCLA’s Anne McKnight talking about her class on urban agriculture.
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5:42 PM | Michelle Rhee Leaves the Education Reform Trenches
Just about no one has a mixed view of former Washington, D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee. Even the announcement that she’s stepping down from leadership at the education reform organization Students First prompted a firestorm of commentary. So I decided to add a few (quieter) thoughts about Rhee’s departure in a TPM column this week: ...if Rhee’s departure feels like a surrender, her critics have badly misunderstood the state of American education debates. There are […]
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4:10 PM | Open Science News – 22 August 2014
What was new in open science this week? CGIAR is running a competition “to find new, enticing and innovative online ways to present CGIAR research facts, figures and open data sources”. After the Open Source Pharma conference, attendees launched a Thunderclap to draw more attention to the need for open source drug [...]
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4:00 PM | Transfer Students Often Don't Get Credit
A frequent recommendation of financial planners is that for parents want to save money on college they should sending their kids to inexpensive community colleges and then transfer to a four-year schools after two years. That way the student gets the name brand degrees at half the price. While I’ve long questioned how appropriate a solution this really is to the cost problem—If more students want to go to community colleges, how do the community colleges cope? They don’t have […]
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4:00 PM | Sing your spiders away
Just found this in the Metro: Must be something to do with the frequency of his voice, bet it vibrates the web so the spider thinks it either has prey or is being attacked. I am sad that the Metro … Continue reading →
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12:49 PM | The Science of Depression
Good and short video about the possible explanations for the origin of depression. From serotonin, to neurogenesis and genetics.   Related posts:Science, gender and the emergence of depression in American psychiatry 1950-1980 Genes Predict Reponse to Lithium Addition for Treatment Resistant Depression Why Can’t We find a Gene for Depression?
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11:15 AM | Friday links: text mining the ESA meeting, the rise and decline of the US (Forest Service), and more
Also this week: Shark Week jumps the shark, salmon cannon (really?!), depressing data on the gender gap in tenure decisions (in some fields), no we shouldn’t shut down all comment sections, and more. Oh, and Google Maps vs. the Proclaimers. … Continue reading →
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11:11 AM | Why Athletics Resembles Academia
Today it’s four years exactly since my first blogpost appeared. Four years of having fun writing about different sorts of things: academic life, committee work and membership, the issues facing women and the joys and frustrations of working at disciplinary … Continue reading →
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8:53 AM | Peer review service recognition – ORCID-CASRAI recommendations need your feedback
As I posted earlier this year, I have been co-chairing the CASRAI Peer Review Services Working Group together with Laura Paglione (Technical Director, ORCID) to look at the best way to recognise referee reports as a formal output in for example an ORCID profile. This project has looked at the peer review [...]
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