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Posts

April 09, 2014

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7:19 PM | Almost 70% of Teachers Are Not Engaged. Here's Why That Matters So Much
Wednesday Gallup released a major report on the State of American Schools. Their data paints a picture of schools performing as a complex ecosystem, with the wellbeing, engagement, and performance of teachers, students, and principals all intertwined. The report combines decades of surveys of 5 million American teachers and principals with the results of the Gallup Student Poll, now billed at the largest survey of American students with 600,000 5th through 12 grade participants, and […]
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6:00 PM | At Last, Porn Studies
For those of you looking for new scholarly research projects, or trying to publish rather, well, unusual studies, perhaps about the adult film industry, academic publishing has provided America with a new venue. According to a press release from Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), the academic publisher, which also issues such venerated titles as Aging and Mental Health, the British Journal for the History of Philosophy, and the Journal of Library Administration, announced last week that […]
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5:28 PM | She loves you, she loves you not Whether in fiction or history,...
She loves you, she loves you not Whether in fiction or history, women have often gotten a bad rap for being fickle. But it may just be evolution. A landmark meta-analysis suggests that ovulating women have evolved to prefer mates who display ‘sexy traits’ (think muscular build, dominant behavior, symmetrical facial features). UCLA psychologist Martie Haselton, who is one of a handful of pioneers in research on behavioral changes at ovulation, explains that sexy traits are not […]
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4:02 PM | Therianthropic
Set somewhere in the north of England where ancient shadows hover just beyond glimpsing, teen novel Bone Jack by Sara Crowe shows that fiction for young readers needn’t stint on horror and darkness – and can cleave to much more … Continue reading →
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3:42 PM | Lusty Worms Pass Love Notes through Tiny Bubbles
Nearly every cell in your body is releasing microscopic bubbles that contain tiny messages to other cells in your body. The bubbles are so small that if a cell were the size of the Empire State Building, the vesicles would be the size of teenage couriers, running to deliver messages to neighboring buildings in the organism of Manhattan. But now there's evidence that at least in worms, these little bubbles, called extracellular vesicles (ECVs), can leave the cells of the Manhattan Island worm to […]

Wang J, Silva M, Haas LA, Morsci NS, Nguyen KC, Hall DH & Barr MM (2014). C. elegans Ciliated Sensory Neurons Release Extracellular Vesicles that Function in Animal Communication., Current biology : CB, 24 (5) 519-25. PMID:

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Editor's Pick
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12:41 PM | Unpaid Work in Academia.
I currently have two interns. They’re undergraduates, and they’re getting ready to move on. I only have money to pay them through April. They knew that going in. Actually, going in, they thought it was only until last December, but I scrounged up a little extra dough. Right now we have a draft of the […]
Editor's Pick
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12:00 PM | The field ecology of a gut microbe inside bullet ants
This is the latest paper from my lab, which I’m really excited about. When we designed the project, several people told us that it would be useless. “It’s pointless to study the ecology of a symbiotic microbe in the wild when we have yet to specify its function inside the host.” It was only two […]
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11:59 AM | Speaking.
I know that most of my readers read me for the writing on alcoholism, not on science or medicine, or meta-science and meta-medicine. I have a meta-science post brewing about the treatment of trainees after they have graduated/moved on, but this post isn’t about that. In fact, this is barely a post at all. As […]
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11:15 AM | The importance of knowing and recognizing the limits of your knowledge
At some point in every qualifying exam, there will be a question that the student doesn’t know the answer to. Actually, that’s not quite accurate – this doesn’t happen just once; it happens repeatedly, in every qualifying exam. That’s part … Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: Albena Ivanisevic
Editor’s note: This is an entry in an ongoing series of posts called This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State that we hope will highlight the diversity of researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The series is inspired by the This Is What A Scientist Looks Like site. This submission comes from
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8:47 AM | Middle-Earth gets a geological makeover
As if J. R. R. Tolkien wasn’t brilliant enough with his creation of Middle-Earth, it appears that using his numerous maps and illustrations provided, supplemented by observations from within the texts themselves, a geological reconstruction can be achieved! I recently came across this old article from the Proceedings of the J. R. R. Tolkien Centenary […]
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8:09 AM | Happy Anniversary!
Dear Mendeley Community, Wow, it’s now already one year after Mendeley was acquired by Elsevier, and as it’s probably common, I would like to take the opportunity to reflect on the past 12 months, and tell you a little bit about the insights and how I think about Mendeley and Elsevier one year into the […]
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5:19 AM | OYM 29: Learning the Milky Way
    Last week, OYM made its conference debut at a local interdisciplinary graduate research symposium and, although it meant we all had to switch up our approach to conferences, it was a great experience.  Welcome to all the new listeners we talked to over the two days, it’s nice to have you with us! On ...read more The post OYM 29: Learning the Milky Way appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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1:19 AM | Computers in Libraries, Day 2
Crystal’s View of Day 2: Every day at CIL begins with a keynote where we get to hear from notable people in the industry. Tuesday’s Keynote: Hacking strategies for library innovation by Mary Lee Kennedy, Chief Library Officer for the … Continue reading → The post Computers in Libraries, Day 2 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.

April 08, 2014

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11:20 PM | Here are the slides from my talk on blogging
My talk on blogging at Virginia Tech went over quite well. Enjoyed the whole visit, it was very well organized (thanks Alex and Greg!) and I had a bunch of really interesting conversations. For folks at Virginia Tech and elsewhere … Continue reading →
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10:15 PM | Million Records Project Raises as Many Questions as Answers
Last month, the Student Veterans of America (SVA), together with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Student Clearinghouse, released a host of new data on veterans’ higher education outcomes. The Million Records Project report, published by SVA, made use of previously unavailable data to show that more than half of veterans in a large sample had graduated within the 10-year period. (For the full summary, check out our earlier write-up here.) But for all the questions the […]
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7:09 PM | Eternal sunshine of the progressive mind
Every now and then, I’m instructed to have more faith in the progressive tendencies of humanity. Racism and sexism, I’m told, are relics of the past, and especially so in science and tech. Progressive, open minded people are against discrimination. … Continue reading →
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6:26 PM | "White inside the ham bone, always." We got a behind-the-scenes...
"White inside the ham bone, always." We got a behind-the-scenes tour of the Dr. Seuss collection at UC San Diego. This is a color guide for Green Eggs and Ham. Dr. Seuss (whose real name was Ted Geisel) would commonly write notes in the margin to indicate how he would like his illustrations to print.
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6:24 PM | What Works -and Doesn't- in a Longer School Day
When Say Yes to Education, a New York-based nonprofit, took its program for school reform to Syracuse, N.Y., one of its nonnegotiable conditions was that the district stretch learning time into the late afternoon and the summer. Say Yes based its demand on the assumption that urban students like those in Syracuse generally require more time to compensate for gaps. A number of reports beginning in the 1990s have urged schools to lengthen the time that youngsters spend learning. Now, five and a […]
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5:34 PM | The Lure of the Ring—A Chloride Ion Channel Gene Makes a Surprise Appearance in Ciliogenesis
It's been nearly 14 years since the primary cilium pushed its way into cell biology's center ring with the discovery that this "irrelevant" vestigial organelle was connected to a common and fatal human disorder, polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In the years since, a long list of diseases and disorders have been classified as ciliopathies while the primary cilium currently has 2,347 citations on PubMed. One ring to rule them all—The “nimbus” ring, […]

Ruppersburg CC & Hartzell HC (2014). The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel ANO1/TMEM16A regulates primary ciliogenesis., Molecular biology of the cell, PMID:

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5:01 PM | Schools Can Overcome the Challenges of Poverty — With the Right Interventions
When President Obama launched My Brother’s Keeper last month to help young men and boys of color reach their full potential, he shared what had made the difference in his own life: “I had people who encouraged me — not just my mom and grandparents, but wonderful teachers and community leaders — and they’d push me to work hard and study hard and make the most of myself…They never gave up on me,” he recounted, “and so I didn’t give up on […]
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3:13 PM | Round on Systems.
Behold! Two posts on health care delivery in a row! This morning I was meeting with the leadership of our cardiac surgery center for a project I’m working on. We’re upending the schedules of our surgeons and cardiologists in order to improve our service thresholds, and it looks like there’s going to be a lot […]
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12:53 PM | Catch up with us April 28th, at our San Diego meetup!
F1000Research is hitting the road again! This time we’ll be attending the Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego from April 26th-30th. If you’re planning to attend, please visit our booth to grab a few goodies, talk science and publishing, and learn more about our journal. As part of our visit we’ll also be hosting [...]
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11:29 AM | Where Credit is Due: How Acknowledging Expertise Can Help Conservation Efforts
Scientists know that tapping into local expertise is key to conservation efforts aimed at protecting biodiversity – but researchers rarely give credit to these local experts. Now some scientists are saying that’s a problem, both for the local experts and for the science itself. To address the problem, a group of scientists is calling for
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5:55 AM | Tenure track
This is the feeling when a tenure track professor couldn’t get his/her tenure. Lost in space!
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3:06 AM | "Unprecedented" Numbers Opt Out of State Tests-What's Next?
Today students in New York State begin three days of state-mandated tests in English language arts.  But thousands of families across the state, from Syracuse and Buffalo to the Hudson Valley, Long Island to New York City, will sit out the tests, citing concerns with their relevance and the sense that the curriculum has been taken over by preparation. “It shifts the entire focus of the classroom,” says Jeannette Deutermann, the organizer behind Long Island Opt Out, a Facebook […]

April 07, 2014

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11:54 PM | Computers in Libraries: Day 1
Here we are!  D.C.! Good evening!   Crystal and I managed to make it from Atlanta to Washington DC without much trouble… although it took so long at baggage claim I had visions of doing our presentation in the ratty clothes … Continue reading → The post Computers in Libraries: Day 1 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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8:38 PM | The making of a chemist
By the time he was three years old, British chemist Richard Ernst had not yet learned to speak English. His only way of communicating was through the translation of his sister, Wreni, who was a year younger and the only person in the world who understood Ernst’s made-up language. His parents worried he was mentally disabled. […]
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8:17 PM | The riddle of zebras’ stripes Why zebras have black and white...
The riddle of zebras’ stripes Why zebras have black and white stripes is a question that has intrigued scientists and spectators for centuries. A research team led by UC Davis, has now examined this riddle (in a very systematic way). Many hypotheses for zebra stripes have been proposed since Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin debated the problem 120 years ago. These include: A form of camouflage Disrupting predatory attack by visually confusing carnivores A mechanism of heat […]
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5:36 PM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: Edgar Lobaton
Editor’s note: This is the first entry in an ongoing series of posts called This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State that we hope will highlight the diversity of researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The series is inspired by the This Is What A Scientist Looks Like site. This submission comes
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