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Posts

April 02, 2014

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11:40 AM | How, and why, to take a grad student sabbatical (guest post)
Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post by Margaret Kosmala, whom you may recall from her previous guest post talking about citizen science in ecology. We’re hoping that this will be the first in a series of several guest … Continue reading →
Editor's Pick
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11:20 AM | World Autism Awareness Day
Today is Autism Awareness Day. But what is autism, and why is awareness of autism so important? Olivia Bolton explains. There are around 700,000 people diagnosed with autism in the UK and autism touches the lives of 2.7 million people every day. With the prevalence of autism on the rise it is about time that …
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10:02 AM | The ICECReam Guruview: Lorimer Moseley
We haven’t done one of these for a while. Here we ask an established researcher for their thoughts on the biz.   Lorimer Moseley will be name familiar to many of you in the pain and/or physiotherapy research field. His research is all about understanding the role of the brain and mind complex and chronic […]
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8:27 AM | Open Access – reasons to be cheerful: a reply to Agrawal
A opinion piece by Anurag Agrawal that was rather skeptical about some aspects of moves toward open access was published in the March issue of Trends in Plant Sciences. I felt several of the arguments advanced by Agrawal were rather … Continue reading →
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4:29 AM | OYM28: Untangling HSPs Genetic Network
This week on the On Your Mind Neuroscience Podcast: It’s amazing how much a disrupted schedule can affect productivity.  This week, Liam and Kat have had their sleep patterns turned upside down for one reason or another and are dealing with the repercussions.  In Liam’s case that means working in the lab until the early ...read more The post OYM28: Untangling HSPs Genetic Network appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.

Novarino G, Fenstermaker AG, Zaki MS, Hofree M, Silhavy JL, Heiberg AD, Abdellateef M, Rosti B, Scott E, Mansour L & Masri A (2014). Exome sequencing links corticospinal motor neuron disease to common neurodegenerative disorders., Science (New York, N.Y.), 343 (6170) 506-11. PMID:

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April 01, 2014

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10:17 PM | Time Rolls On, Even Without Memory
A fascinating paper asks what one man with no memory – and no regrets – can really teach us about time: Individuals With Episodic Amnesia Are Not Stuck In Time. Researchers Car Craver and colleagues describe the case of “KC”, a former “roadie for rock bands, prone to drinking and occasional rash behavior” who suffered […]The post Time Rolls On, Even Without Memory appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Craver CF, Kwan D, Steindam C & Rosenbaum RS (2014). Individuals With Episodic Amnesia Are Not Stuck In Time, Neuropsychologia, PMID:

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Editor's Pick
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10:15 PM | asapscience: Is there a science to artistic expression? And who...
asapscience: Is there a science to artistic expression? And who are some people combining science and art creatively? Hey, this is one of our favorite topics! Here are a few of our favorite artworks that intersect with science and engineering… The brain on music: Researchers at UCSF worked with Mickey Hart (former drummer of the Grateful Dead) to create real time images of his brain while he performs. A lovely drawing of UCLA’s Anna Fisher, the first mother in space. Do-Ho […]
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8:59 PM | Short guideline on multi-authored papers.
After being on the two sides of the story (first author and one more of dozens of co-authors) I already made a few errors someone may find useful to know, specially since multi-author papers (more than 10-15 authors from different … Continue reading →
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6:29 PM | On Saying No
The comments on my last post have prompted me finally to write this one, one that I have had in mind for a few weeks. In fact, ever since I gave a talk at Merton College, Oxford, when an audience … Continue reading →
Editor's Pick
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4:43 PM | Dear Scientist, can you help me with a project?
Sharp uptick in high school projects comprising: "email questions to some random expert on the internet" lately. Anyone else getting these? — Drug Monkey (@drugmonkeyblog) April 1, 2014 The above tweet brought up something I have been seeing a lot of recently as well. At some point during the semester I will usually receive a […]
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4:05 PM | hrtbps: FLYING BICYCLE, c1930. Photomontage of Max Wiedenhöft,...
hrtbps: FLYING BICYCLE, c1930. Photomontage of Max Wiedenhöft, a German airplane designer, on a rocket-powered flying bicycle over Tempelhof Airport in Berlin, Germany. Printed as an April Fool’s joke in a German newspaper, c1930. (via) Some April Fools tomfoolery for you all.
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1:44 PM | My Problem is My Problem.
Even though I’ve been sober for a few days now (2,237 to be precise), I still can be known to look longingly at a beverage from time to time. Sunday, after hours of driving through torrents of rain, moving in frigid cold, and then walking through sleet and ice for half an hour, I could […]
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12:00 PM | Scientific ethics discussions in labs
Meg recently wrote a nice post on what various people do in lab meetings. The small number of you who regularly read my posts will know I don’t often like bald prescriptions in statistics or about how to do science. … Continue reading →
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8:52 AM | Anneliditely
You probably won’t believe this, it being 1 April and all, but I have literally just taken delivery of 250 live worms. Mrs Crox ordered them to replenish our wormery, which was looking a bit tired, many of its inhabitants … Continue reading →
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7:18 AM | Ring Ring
Asteroids are just boring hunks of space rock, right? Well, you might have thought so. But you would be wrong. Well… Mostly wrong. Some of them are rather interesting. This particular interesting hunk of space rock is 10199 Chariklo, and … Continue reading →

March 31, 2014

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10:10 PM | Assigning One's Own Books to One's Students
The Ethicist has a problem that will interest Henry: I am a graduate student at a state university. One of four required texts for a course was written by the professor, and the subject matter of the text is also the content of his lectures. A significant portion of my grade is based on a ‘‘review’’ I write of his text. Is it ethical to require students to buy a book that you wrote? Aren’t I already paying tuition for this professor’s expertise and […]
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5:19 PM | Boundaries and boxes
No-one likes to be pigeonholed but the tendency to pigeonhole, or put things into boxes, comes naturally to us and can be valuable, within reason. Categories I think pigeonholing gets an overly bad press. The word has a pejorative ring, … Continue reading →
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5:11 PM | skunkbear: Herding Cells - With Electricity! Researchers at UC...
skunkbear: Herding Cells - With Electricity! Researchers at UC Berkeley have managed to use an electric field to herd a flock of epithelial cells — a trick called galvanotaxis. It’s a very blunt tool at the moment, but scientists hope it can be refined and used to help wounds heal. An exciting step in the direction of “smart bandages” — using an electrical stimulation to help heal wounds. The researchers used the same cells that bind together to form skin,
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4:58 PM | The Maison Des Girrafes Caption Competition #16
I am sure Heidi (large dog) and Saffron (small dog) are saying something to each other, but I was out of earshot, and the noise of the surf was too great for me to hear it…
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2:43 PM | Cerebrovascular physiology – article alert #72
Regulation of brain blood flow 353- Circadian cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2 -  Strohm et al. 354- Why is the neural control of cerebral autoregulation so controversial? Ainslie and Brassard 355- Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease  – Hall et al. Brain autoregulation 356- Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation and Tissue Oxygenation in Amnestic […]
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12:09 PM | Sense About Science workshop on peer review in London
One of the things we’re working on behind the scenes is improving education about peer review. We’re talking to university staff and faculty involved in teaching graduate students about peer review, I’ve set up a group on Mendeley that collects good examples of open peer review reports, and we’re a partner of Sense [...]
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12:00 PM | Which classes should tenure-track faculty deprioritize?
Academia has an adjunct problem. Most of the verbiage on this topic (that I see, at least) focuses on the plight of adjunct faculty.  I agree that this matters, a lot. But, this isn’t the bottom line for the people who are the designated focus of the teaching institutions: the students. At the top of my list […]
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11:48 AM | The power of “checking all the boxes” in scientific research: the example of character displacement (UPDATED)
Brian’s written a lot on this blog about the importance and power of making and testing predictions (here’s his most recent post on this). I agree, but I also worry that, like any good thing, an emphasis on testing predictions … Continue reading →
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10:01 AM | Thinking about having a heart attack? Call an ambulance (and optionally, get married)
If you're having a heart attack, the obvious thing to do is call an ambulance. Isn't it? It is if you want to save a lifeA little while ago we talked about a meta-analysis showing that, worldwide, the chances of surviving a heart attack are reduced if it happens out-of-hours at night or at the weekend. Within a few hours of my blog post, Alan Bagnall, a consultant interventional cardiologist at the UK's second largest primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) service, wrote to me with a […]
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6:57 AM | News from San Diego
Well, its the start of baseball season in the US, and my beloved San Diego Padres just beat the hated Los Angeles Dodgers in their first game of the season. Yay!While trying to get a news article about this game from the San Diego Union Tribune, I coincidentally came cross the latest genomic news. Craig Venter (who is famous for many things- sequencing the first bacterial genome, creating the first synthetic bacterium, sequencing his genome as the human genome, sequencing his poodle's genome, […]
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4:00 AM | A Big Prep and a Short Walk Pays off for ASCB Member Titia de Lange
It was an all-or-nothing moment. Titia de Lange, a newly hired assistant professor at the Rockefeller University, had months of prep work and her entire grant's supply budget in hand as she waited to cross York Avenue, the busy north-south street on Manhattan's Upper East Side that separates Rockefeller from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where a collaborator was waiting to sequence de Lange's protein distillate. "We walked with all the protein we had from 1,500 liters of HeLa cells," […]

March 30, 2014

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8:10 PM | What can modeling do for you?
In the blog so far, we've talked often about computational models - how they're made, what can go wrong, and what they could be like in the future. But what exactly are they - and why should anyone (especially biologists) care?A model is a representation, or imitation, of a system that is difficult to examine directly. Biologists already use models all the time. For example, we'd like to understand biological process in humans, but since most of us can't experiment on humans, model organisms […]
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6:55 PM | Moon Boy
After splashdown at 4:51 pm on 24th July 1969 the Apollo 11 astronauts returning from the first moon landing  had to don full-body Biological Isolation Garments before they could leave the conical command module that was bobbing in the Pacific Ocean. … Continue reading →
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6:31 PM | The Cupcakes of Mitosis
Tomorrow, Crox Minor is having a bake sale in aid of her favourite charity Children of Peace. This afternoon she and Mrs Crox made loads of cupcakes … some of them on the theme of mitosis. Here are two cupcakes, … Continue reading →

March 28, 2014

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6:54 PM | While walking around the Prelinger Archive in San Francisco we...
While walking around the Prelinger Archive in San Francisco we did and did not find this cat…
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