Posts

July 14, 2014

+
6:08 PM | Learning the Biotech Ropes—ASCB-KGI Short Course Wraps Up
The 40 came from all over North America, Europe, and Africa, 24 grad students and 16 postdocs, chosen from the 532 applications the ASCB received from members for a special 12-day "short" course on "Managing Science in the Biotech Industry" at the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) with funding from EMD Millipore. Besides their ASCB connection, what the participants had in common were years of academic training and a curiosity about life in biotech. Graduate students and postdocs were eager to […]
+
6:03 PM | In Mississippi Schools, Access to Technology Lacking, Uneven
CLINTON, Miss.—When Kelsi Collins was first given a laptop last year at Clinton High School, she hesitated to change from years of reading textbooks and writing assignments by hand to researching topics and typing papers online. It didn’t help that, after she’d ignored teachers’ warnings to back up her work, her computer crashed and she lost ‘everything’ just nine weeks into the school year. Still, within a few months, Collins was hooked. “I use it for […]
+
3:25 PM | Masculinity, Sensitivity, and Second Wave Privilege.
I am frankly daunted even beginning to write about this topic. Sometimes I feel like it is audacity, these days, to suggest that masculinity has intrinsic value. Indeed, every time I write about masculinity my elder sister asks how anything I write is unique to maleness, and separate from simple adulthood. I don’t know that […]
+
1:09 PM | Surviving pre-tenure: The People
In many ways, it's almost pointless to talk about all the other aspects of pre-tenure if you can't get good people in your lab. The best laid plans are simply a terrible lab dynamic away from being burnt to the ground. This is a bit of a catch 22, because it is hard to recruit […]
+
1:00 PM | Pre-tenure Advice: Blocking out time for your research
As part of the Carnival that Prof-like Substance is organizing on Pre-tenure advice, I thought I’d throw in a piece of advice that anyone who asks me this question gets from me. Here it is: Create a calendar and block out time for you. Sounds simple, and honestly a little stupid, but it’s the best […]
+
1:00 PM | How the Washington Monthly Helped Kill Corinthian Colleges and Tame the For-Profit College Industry
Last month I wrote about how Corinthian Colleges, one of the largest for-profit education companies in the United States, was in trouble. A lot of trouble. After months of wrangling about the outcomes of Corinthian students, the federal government finally put a 21-day hold on the company’s access to federal grants and loans. And that turns out to have been a serious blow. On July 4, Goldie Blumenstyk wrote at the Chronicle of Higher Education that Corinthian will die: Corinthian […]
+
11:08 AM | Navigating the Tenure Track
This post is for the pre-tenure survival blog carnival that proflikesubstance is hosting. It has some of my general thoughts on navigating the tenure track. These are things that worked for me or that I wish I’d known/thought about while … Continue reading →
Editor's Pick
+
11:00 AM | Parental care and scientific careers: a fish metaphor
Dads typically do less parental care than the mom, at least in the US. This is a problem, especially for the mom’s career. Many men, and I suspect particularly academics, are genuinely focused on parenting. They want to do right by their partners, and make sure that they don’t create an inequitable parental burden. Parenting is a joy,…
+
10:28 AM | Mendeley moves into the cloud: It’s nice up here!
Last week we took what might seem like a small step, but was in fact a very giant leap by moving mendeley.com into the cloud. Now you might be thinking “Mendeley is already cloud-based, what are you talking about?” It’s true that our users can access their papers, annotations and all other data on any device, […]
+
8:02 AM | Yeast 2.0 at Macquarie
I've blogged before on Synthetic Biology, particularly with respect to the success of Macquarie University's iGEM teams- for instance, here and here. Synthetic biology is a new scientific field that combines engineering principles with molecular biological approaches to design and construct biological devices and systems. The rational synthesis of “designer” organisms has the potential to revolutionise biotechnological applications in areas such as bioenergy and […]
+
5:06 AM | Young People on Psychosis
Hands on description of psychosis and it’s consequences. An enthralling short film made by John Richardson (former service user) and Belinda Giles. Surrounding the experience of psychosis and the positive role the Early Intervention service can play in that often rocky voyage. Featuring captivating personal insights alongside a tightly woven narrative. Provocatively packed with vintage […] Related posts:Cannabis use in young people: The risk for schizophrenia Should young people […]
+
1:00 AM | Links Roundup #21
Blog of Interest Teaching in Higher Ed is a blog on PKM, educational technology, and curation as applied to higher education.  The author is Bonni Stachowiak, who teaches courses in business, marketing, leadership, and human resources at Vanguard University.  Check … Continue reading → The post Links Roundup #21 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.

July 13, 2014

+
5:08 PM | North Sea Jazz 2014
The marriage between hip hop and jazz is difficult. Robert Glasper is one of the experts trying to combine these two with great results. Enjoy this video. It’s over after tonight, the Nort Sea Jazz festival 2014 of which for me Robert Glasper was a highlight, together with Stevie Wonder. Another highlight was the legendary […] Related posts:North Sea Jazz Tips The Berliner Philharmoniker at Home by Digital Concert Hall Golden Age of Jazz in Pictures
+
12:29 PM | Link and Photo Love
Hello all Sorry we’re being a bit slow here at the Au Blog at the moment, but you know. It is summer after all. The sun beckons, the wind rustling the trees tells tales (as you might have noticed, editor-in-chief is not in Scotland at the moment). She will however take some time to give…
+
7:48 AM | Holiday Questions in Natural History
Last week I escaped to the Shropshire hills and blissfully allowed my brain to stop turning over matters concerning committee-work, exams, grants and other responsibilities past, present and future. Instead I have been exercising my limbs up and down the … Continue reading →

July 12, 2014

+
8:22 PM | Flying ants: Fascinating, but gross
Today in London appears to be ‘Flying Ant Day’ – a day in a the summer where young ant queens fly away to find their own colony. The smaller, male flying ants mate with the queens on this day, and … Continue reading →
+
3:21 PM | Building DC goes to Mexico (or, why is the geologist taking pictures of the doorframe?)
One of the interesting things about inviting a geologist to any sort of historic site is the inevitable moment when they get distracted by the stones that have been used to build whatever fabulous architectural treasure it is that you're admiring. Case in point: When I was invited to go to the New Horizons Symposium in the Chimalistac neighborhood of Mexico city, I spent at least a few minutes each day taking photos of the walls (much to the amusement of my fellow conference-goers).
+
1:57 PM | Should Colleges Be Able to Determine Costs of Living?
I was reading through the newest National Center for Education Statistics report with just-released federal data on the cost of college and found some interesting numbers. (The underlying data are available under the “preliminary release” tab of the IPEDS Data Center.) Table 2 of the report shows the change in inflation-adjusted costs for tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, and other expenses included in the cost of attendance figure between 2011-12 and […]
+
1:00 PM | What’s in a name of a hurricane?
claimtoken-53d083baf0f27 A few months ago, a study came out in PNAS that sparked a lot of media interest: Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes. The idea is not that the most severe hurricanes happen to have female names, but instead that more people die in hurricanes that have female names than in those with […]

July 11, 2014

+
4:56 PM | What the Department of Education Gets Wrong About School Counselors
Alyson Klein at Politics K-12 reports that, on the heels of a civil rights data release revealing that one in five high schools has no school counselor, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, is pushing state school chiefs to support school counselors more effectively. Though Klein focuses on the divergence between the administration’s rhetorical support for school counseling and the possible ramifications of their funding strategy, the Secretary’s letter underscores the […]
+
4:51 PM | Teacher Input in the Quest for Personalized Learning
As everything in our media environment becomes more tailored to an individual’s tastes and skills, education too is searching for ways to put the technology’s capacity for individualization to use. Whether to boost student engagement, diagnose a student’s learning gaps more precisely, or provide automated differentiation, personalized learning is the object of much hope for those who see technology’s potential for improving education. Still, that potential is far from […]
+
2:39 PM | There’s a spider… in the post?
Ever had one of those days where you just pop into work to pick up a few bits so that you can go back home to do work in your pyjamas with unlimited cups of tea, only to find that … Continue reading →
+
1:30 PM | Thinking about space, part eleventy-thousand
I’ve posted here in the past about my obsession concern with spaces and what they signal: who’s welcome here, what kind of work is done here, etc. I’ve been thinking about space again recently—specifically, research space and recruitment to the field and how the two intersect. A bit of background: Last year Carleton started a […]
+
12:00 PM | Recommended reads #31
Setting boundaries for summers when faculty are not paid. Whoa. A “peer review ring” was caught and sixty papers were retracted. I’ve joked about such a thing before, but never truly thought that something like that would actually exist, especially on such a large scale. Considering the difficulty in detecting such a thing, it really makes…
+
11:35 AM | Friday links: visualizing sampling error, Ben Bolker vs. statistical machismo, why be wrong, and more
Also this week: big news about peer review at Am Nat, allometry vs. monsters, zombie ideas ideas about zombies, administrators > faculty, pointless (?) scientific prizes, and more. Also, the delicious, starchy future of crowdfunding. :-) From Brian: On our … Continue reading →
+
10:42 AM | Interview: What’s wrong with the Human Brain Project?
The hot story in neuroscience this week has been the controversy over Europe’s Human Brain Project (HBP). On Monday, 156 neuroscientists signed an open letter calling for major reforms of the ambitious program, and pledging to boycott it if things don’t change. Since then, the number of signatories on the letter’s NeuroFuture.eu site has grown […]The post Interview: What’s wrong with the Human Brain Project? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

July 10, 2014

+
6:28 PM | I will reduce my blogging activities for a while…
Dear readers, I am presently on vacation and soon in paternity leave. It will thus be quiet here for a while ;-) Stay tuned for more cerebrovascular physiology related content later this year ! In the meantime, have a great summer ! PBFiled under: Uncategorized
+
5:48 PM | Cerebrovascular physiology – article alert #86
High altitude and the brain 432- Cerebral hemodynamic characteristics of acute mountain sickness upon acute high-altitude exposure at 3,700 m in young Chinese men – Bian et al.  Left ventricular assist device and the brain 433- Cerebrovascular disease in the era of left ventricular assist devices with continuous flow: Risk factors, diagnosis and treatment – […]
+
5:12 PM | ucsciencetoday: A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can...
ucsciencetoday: A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can improve the ability to do complex moves by walking through them slowly and encoding the movement with a cue through ‘marking’. Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues (including a UC Irvine collaborator) were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.” Their findings suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical […]
+
5:08 PM | I suppose a welcome is in order!
So, then. You made it! Thanks for visiting my blog for its very first post. Feel free to browse the (somewhat limited at the moment) pages for more information about me, and what I hope this blog will achieve. More interesting … Continue reading →
23456789
270 Results