Posts

October 14, 2014

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5:23 PM | The King Herself Egypt’s Pharaoh Hatshepsut had presided over...
The King Herself Egypt’s Pharaoh Hatshepsut had presided over her kingdom’s most peaceful and prosperous period in generations. Yet 25 years after her death, much of the evidence of her success had been erased or reassigned to her male predecessors. Even after 20th-century archaeologists began to unearth traces of the woman who defied tradition to crown herself as king, Hatshepsut still didn’t get her due, a UCLA Egyptologist argues in a forthcoming book. “She’s […]
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5:00 PM | Being Black Is Not a Risk Factor
I participated in the National Black Child Development Institute’s State of the Black Child report forum and release on Oct. 11. The report, “Being Black is Not a Risk Factor: Statistics and Strengths-Based Solutions from the State of Michigan,” responds to disquieting numbers in ways the title suggests. Black people aren’t broken; systems and policies are the risky propositions. We still hear the insidious misnomers “endangered species,” “at-risk […]
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1:48 PM | Why Spirituality?
One very important aspect of recovery is the “maintenance of our spiritual condition”. Now, as a person who is not religious and not even particularly spiritual in any traditional sense (though I used to be), I have to consider deeply what that means. Why do we associate sobriety with spirituality? How does that help me […]
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1:00 PM | New iBiology Videos Explore the Link Between Discovery and Medicine
"Interest in biology has never been higher,” says Louis Reichardt, emeritus professor of physiology at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). And yet, as federal research funding declines, Reichardt worries that many graduate students are despairing of their prospects for productive research careers. “It takes some ingenuity now to find future opportunities in science,” he says. In recent years, Reichardt has devoted his own ingenuity to helping students find these […]
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12:50 PM | Ri staff page
My staff page at the Royal Institution is up! http://www.rigb.org/about/organisation/team/schools-and-christmas-lectures/michelle-reeve Very excited to be working here and to be part of this wonderful team. Also, did you know that the Ri has a blog of its own, too? Check it … Continue reading →
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11:45 AM | New on F1000Research – 14 October 2014
Featured article The effects of extremes of pH on the growth and transcriptomic profiles of three haloarchaea [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48e] Aida Moran-Reyna, James A. Coker To find life outside of Earth, we need to know under what sort of extreme conditions organisms are still able to thrive. When it comes [...]
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11:31 AM | How to get a postdoc position (guest post)
Note from Jeremy: This is a guest post by Margaret Kosmala, a postdoc in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard. It’s the first in a planned series on life as a postdoc. ************************************** I did not start thinking about getting … Continue reading →

October 13, 2014

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9:17 PM | Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest?
“Emodiversity” – a life containing a balance of different emotions – is good for you. So say psychologists Jordi Quoidbach and colleagues in a rather cool new paper (pdf). In two large surveys (with a total of over 37,000 responders), conducted in France and Belgium, Quoidbach et al. show that emodiversity is an independent predictor […]The post Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Quoidbach J, Gruber J, Mikolajczak M, Kogan A, Kotsou I & Norton MI (2014). Emodiversity and the Emotional Ecosystem., Journal of experimental psychology. General, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25285428

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8:26 PM | OYM 50(ish): Still NFty at 50!
It’s our 50th episode (for real this time) and the whole gang is back together to celebrate and talk science! Adel’s taken time from his busy med school schedule to bring us tales of life and work across the pond.  Meanwhile, back at home, it’s funding season and Liam and Kathryn have been tackling the ...read more The post OYM 50(ish): Still NFty at 50! appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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7:10 PM | New Research Suggests Repeating Elementary School Grades - Even Kindergarten - is Harmful
The already muddy research on whether it’s better to hold back struggling students or promote them to the next grade just got muddier. A new study ,“The Scarring Effects of Primary-Grade Retention? A Study of Cumulative Advantage in the Educational Career,” by Notre Dame sociologist Megan Andrew, published Sept. 26, 2014, in the journal Social Forces is an empirically solid analysis that adds more weight to those who say retention — what education wonks call […]
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6:36 PM | berkeleyengineering: Ninja walker One team in Professor Amy...
berkeleyengineering: Ninja walker One team in Professor Amy Herr’s senior capstone bioengineering course came up with an elegant solution to improve on walkers for the elderly that don’t fit into tight spaces. The team designed a curved two-position walker that is made with conventional materials, like aluminum tubing and plastic wheels, but is unconventional in appearance and operation. Fully extended, its semi-circular shape functions as effectively as a typical […]
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6:32 PM | What you should know about Mendeley Open Day 2014
Whew. We’re just now recovering from the craziness that was Mendeley Open Day. While we didn’t film everything (to protect the innocent…and the not-so-innocent), you can relive, rewind, and re-watch the day via our YouTube Playlist or catch up on Tweets through our Storify. If for some reason you decide you don’t want to watch […]
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4:42 PM | From Open Access to Open Science – F1000Research Open Access Week activities
Next week is International Open Access Week, and this year we have planned several events for you. Most of them are online events, so you can attend from anywhere in the world, and we hope to (virtually) meet many of you during our Google Hangout, web demo, and Reddit Science AMA.   Google Hangout: [...]
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2:00 PM | How technology can help scientists with chronic illnesses (or Technology FTW!)
This is a guest post by Elita Baldridge (@elitabaldridge) I am currently the remotely working member of Weecology, finishing up my PhD in the lower elevation and better air of Kansas, while the rest of my colleagues are still in Utah, due to developing a chronic illness and finally getting diagnosed with fibromyalgia.  The relocation is […]
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12:00 PM | The Church of High Impact Practices
Educational fads come, and educational fads go. A dominant fad at the moment is “High Impact Practices.” Several years ago, George Kuh wrote a book about High Impact Practices that has come to dominate discussion in universities throughout the United States. If you want the nutshell version of the book, this seems to be a…
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11:41 AM | The Devil’s in The Details: More Research Needed To Address Synthetic Biology Security Concerns
A new paper examines security risks and policy questions related to the growing field of synthetic biology, highlighting significant gaps in our understanding of the nuts and bolts of lab work in synthetic biology that can contribute to security risks.
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11:00 AM | How I quit academia and vowed to never come back (for a month)
I am currently going through the Instructor Training for Software Carpentry. It is a really rich and transformative experience, and besides the software side of things, full of useful elements for teaching in any context. As we are currently discussing how motivation affects learning, our weekly assignment is to write the story of our biggest de-motivation, how it affected us, and what happened (and should have happened) next. Here’s mine. Very few people know it, even fewer know the name […]
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6:01 AM | When tumours meet fashion | Esther Baena & Arielle Gogh
When a scientist and a fashion designer get together, they make cancer research tangible. Scientist Esther Baena and fashion designer Arielle Gogh from team Transmutation, Descience, talk about their experienceMy name is Esther Baena and I am a junior group leader conducting cancer research at the CRUK Manchester Institute, UK. I heard about the Descience project and the first ever Descience competition over a glass of wine with friends at a barbecue in Boston, Massachusetts, and my first […]

October 12, 2014

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11:01 PM | PhD – Positive, Happy, Developments
When wrong is right part 2 This post follows on directly from my previous discussion of my PhD going wrong. As a brief summary of the previous episode: I ran time consuming simulations that took me around 6 month to design and another 6 months to run. The simulation failed in the end because of a bug in some of the software I was using. Therefore, I had to run them all over again!  That took me one day (at least to relaunch it, the simulations are actually still running). In this post […]
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8:45 PM | On a hill
Jenny and I took some friends around the Rotherhithe peninsula yesterday, cutting through Russia Dock Woodlands and finally climbing Stave Hill. From the top of Stave Hill you can appreciate just how flat London geography really is. The Hill’s not … Continue reading →
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6:42 PM | Spreading the Word, Drop by Drop
There are times when I feel as if I’m talked out about gender. I know what the issues are, I’ve written and spoken about them often enough; I’ve dug up and read through some of the relevant papers (though that … Continue reading →
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6:11 PM | What Really Drives Academic Citations?
Citations are today the international currency of the scholarly economy. In theory, academic citations are the gold standard measure of the ‘impact‘ of a piece of work. If it gets other academics talking then it’s important. But why do individual academics cite particular articles? A paper out now in the Social Studies of Science journal […]The post What Really Drives Academic Citations? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Erikson MG & Erlandson P (2014). A taxonomy of motives to cite., Social studies of science, 44 (4) 625-37. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25272615

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2:05 PM | Colouring by letters: the life of Dorothy Hodgkin
BBC Radio 4s An Eye for Pattern: the Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin provides a vivid insight into the life of one of Britains greatest scientistsThe kindly face of one of Britains most accomplished scientists gazes out from the photograph. But the hairstyle and the fact that the picture is black and white distances her from us this is clearly a figure from history. Photography is all very well for recording details precisely but when drained of colour something of the life of the sitter is lost in […]

October 11, 2014

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8:28 PM | In which my palm is crossed with silver: Suffrage Science 2014
Inheritance doesn’t have to be genetic. This past Thursday at London’s Dana Centre, I was one of this year’s recipients for Suffrage Science. For those of you unfamiliar with the scheme, it was launched in 2011 by the Medical Research … Continue reading →
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5:12 PM | txchnologist: Key To LED Lighting Revolution Wins Three Physics...
(L) LED is a layered semiconductor light source. (C) One or more LED chips + lead wires & epoxy shell make a bulb. (R) Multiple LED chips + supporting components make a system. Courtesy GE Lighting. The principle for a light-emitting diode – LED (upper left) and an example of a blue LED lamp. Courtesy Swedish Academy of Sciences. Courtesy GE Lighting. LED lamps require less power to emit light than older light sources. Efficiency is denoted in luminous flux (measured in lumens) per […]

October 10, 2014

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5:10 PM | "Some of the students would scream when the bugs flew at them in the middle of the night, which made..."
“Some of the students would scream when the bugs flew at them in the middle of the night, which made others mad because it woke them up. We all had to get up by 5 a.m., since that’s when the howler monkeys would start screaming.” - UC San Diego’s Ryan Kastner talking about what it can be like to conduct research in the middle of the jungle. The team is developing ways to explore Mayan ruins with 3D imaging as a way to see hard-to-reach tunnels hidden underneath the thick […]
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4:39 PM | De-stressing Jokes
Whenever I am under stress, I turn to jokes. My recent problems with spam attacks on my blog led me to surf the web for new math jokes. Here are some of my recent translations from Russian. * * * Two is the same thing as eight, to some degree. * * * A girl […]
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2:08 PM | My Blog is under Attack
My readers noticed that my blog disappeared several times. Here’s what’s been happening. Spammers were sending tens of thousands of comments a day, which crashed the server several times. My hosting provider doteasy.com couldn’t handle it and took down my blog. They asked me to install CAPTCHAs. Installing CAPTCHAs became a big issue. Since I […]
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12:00 PM | Recommended reads #37
“If you wouldn’t say it in person, don’t say it in an anonymous review.” Boat parts or names of unvaccinated children? A quiz. I’m not a big fan of crowdfunding, because of the asymmetries in who gets money. And I’ve seen firsthand that expressed need sometimes doesn’t match reality. Caveats aside, I really like this one: Planting…
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11:52 AM | Friday links: dump the Canadian CCV, unreclaiming zoology, billion dollar grant, and more
Also this week: new videos for teaching ecology, social media as professional development, the pluses and minuses of minority-focused conferences, the best ecology blog you’ve (well, I’d) never heard of, and more. From Meg: I added two fun, deep sea-related … Continue reading →
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