Posts

April 09, 2015

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3:07 PM | Seeing New Things In A Common ObjectYou’ll find it in every...
Seeing New Things In A Common ObjectYou’ll find it in every artist’s studio: the coffee cup.Wayne Thiebaud, a legendary artist and professor at UC Davis, painted this well-known object in 1961.Originally making his mark as part of the Pop Art movement of the 1960s, Thiebaud had a complex relationship with the movement (“I’m not a card-carrying pop artist”), which included artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein:“Illustrators, commercial artists, […]
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12:05 PM | What to do with a spider in your fruit
Earlier this week, Liz Langley posted a great piece about finding spiders hiding in your fruit. My interview with her was a little longer than what was posted, so I decided to post the full text here… OMG THERE’s A GIANT VENOMOUS SPIDERS IN MY BANNANAS WHAT DO I DO????? Imagine you spot a spider, […]
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11:01 AM | Peter Abrams on ratio-dependent predation as a zombie idea
Peter Abrams has a paper in press at Biological Reviews criticizing the idea of ratio-dependent predation. Briefly, this is the idea that the feeding rate of predator individuals should be modeled as a function of the ratio of prey and … Continue reading →
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10:25 AM | Preventing peer review fraud: F1000Research, the F1000 Faculty and the crowd
Back in November 2014, BioMed Central discovered about 50 manuscripts in their editorial system that involved fake peer reviewers. Following a detailed investigation, they have now started the process of retracting 43 papers that had been published on the basis of reviews from made-up reviewers. Some of these papers were from [...]
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8:31 AM | Will neuroscientists ever be able to read our minds? | Sharon Darwish
Neuroscientists have come far in improving our understanding of the human brain. But just how far can the science take us?As a former neuroscientist, a question I am often asked is, “Do you think neuroscientists will ever be able to read people’s minds?”.My initial reaction to this question to this used to be along the lines of, “Never – our minds are far too complex for any technology to even begin to decode our thoughts,” but upon further research, I would […]

April 08, 2015

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10:17 PM | The University of Florida's Online Bait and Switch
Florida’s flagship state university has an innovative new admissions program: force people to study online as their only chance for admission into the school. According to an article in the Washington Post: Some 3,100 students accepted as freshman by the University of Florida for the fall got a big surprise along with their congratulations notices: They were told that the acceptance was contingent on their agreement to spend their first year taking classes online as part of a new […]
Editor's Pick
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10:10 PM | Why is 'High Quality' So Elusive in Mississippi's Child Care Centers?
JACKSON, Miss. — After 25 years as a commercial lender for a large bank in Indiana, Glenn Farmer’s future suddenly looked uncertain. His company was going through a restructuring that would phase out his department. Instead of looking for a new finance job, Farmer made an unexpected career move: He took over his parents’ preschool business and revamped it top to bottom. “A lot of people thought I was crazy,” Farmer said on a recent morning at Education Depot, his […]
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10:00 PM | In Brazil, Fast-Growing Universities Mirror U.S. Wealth Divide
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil — Her face and bare arms painted with the words “medicina” and “UFRJ” — her major and the acronym, in Portuguese, of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro — Ana Carolina and some classmates stand on the busy Rua Visconde de Pirajá in Rio’s sunny Ipanema district and ask for spare change. The money isn’t for tuition; UFRJ doesn’t charge any. It’s for beer. Spurred on by upperclassmen, she and her […]
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7:31 PM | The Power of One-on-One Tutoring in Early Literacy
Before coming into work this morning I made a stop at the Center City Public Charter School Shaw campus, like I do most Mondays. Down in the school’s basement is a small room with approximately 12 desks; the walls are covered with maps, colorful posters, and student worksheets. There are carts full of books and a shelf lined with about 50 student folders. Source: Reading Partners This is the school’s designated Reading Partners “reading center,” where kindergarten […]
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7:25 PM | What do Rhode Island, Ohio and Colorado Have in Common? Hint: A Partner for Blended Learning
Swiftly transforming a school to a successful digital learning model requires more than good intentions and a can-do spirit. Teacher training, budget planning and crafting a solid instructional plan for the classroom are critical prerequisites, pioneers in blended learning say. Another piece of the puzzle: local community support. Expect to see that boots-on-the-ground outreach in Colorado soon. Last week, leaders in that state announced a new partnership that blended-learning advocates say […]
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6:52 PM | Was Our Moon’s Formation Likely or Lucky?
4.5 billion years ago, a Mars-sized body was believed to have impacted a young Earth, and this planetesimal's obliterated remains coalesced into what is now our Moon. However, certain striking similarities between the Earth and Moon question the likelihood of this event. Two recent papers investigated the giant impact scenario, only to come to opposite conclusions. Read on to hear more about this lunar enigma.
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6:31 PM | Why We Often Forget Things We See Every Day85 college students...
Why We Often Forget Things We See Every Day85 college students tried to draw the Apple logo from memory. Only 1 student got it right. “People had trouble picking out the correct logo even when it was right in front of them,” said Alan Castel, an associate professor of psychology at UCLA and senior author of the study.How can this be, given that logos are designed to be simple, memorable and visually distinctive, and Apple’s logo is among the world’s most […]
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5:14 PM | Which College Will Replace Washington University as the Least Socioeconomically Diverse in the Country?
For years, Washington University in St. Louis has held the dubious distinction of being the least socioeconomically diverse college in the country. That’s about to change. In January, the university announced a plan to double the proportion of Pell Grant recipients that it enrolls by 2020. Under the plan, Wash U. will spend at least $25 million a year for five years to increase the share of students receiving Pell Grants, federal grants that go to students from families making less than […]
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4:19 PM | OYM72: Get Cognitively Enhanced with Dr. Veljko Dubljević
We’re taking a dip into the ethical side of neuroscience this week with our guest host Dr. Veljko Dubljević!  He’s a Banting post-doctoral fellow at the Neuroethics Research Unit at McGill and is working on the ethical implications of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy.  Before coming to Montreal, Veljko obtained the elusive double PhD and has experience ...read more The post OYM72: Get Cognitively Enhanced with Dr. Veljko Dubljević appeared first on On Your Mind […]
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3:40 PM | A Broad Abroad: Why International Experiences Help
I was recently asked to serve on a panel for recent alumni from the International Plan (IP) at Georgia Tech. Essentially, the IP is an add-on to your degree that requires more substantial international experience and knowledge that simply going abroad for a bit or taking international affairs courses. I’m in science, and yes, it’s […]
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12:31 PM | The Linguists Are Coming! The Linguists Are Coming!
Jeffrey Reaser discusses the importance of linguistics and NC State's role in understanding the language of North Carolina.
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12:00 PM | Dear students, a member of the class asked…
This is a post by Catherine Scott. I am TAing a first year introductory Ecology/Evolution course this semester, and the laboratory exam is coming up on Tuesday. I’m spending a lot of time this weekend emailing the entire class list messages that start, “Dear students, a member of the class asked…” I go on to…
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10:57 AM | Open access: a national licence is not the answer
“Open Access: Is a national licence the answer?” is a proposal by David Price and Sarah Chaytor of University College London for a mechanism to provide full access to everyone within the UK to all published research. It was published on 31 … Continue reading →
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3:17 AM | Bad Day for Journalism, Good Day for Journalism Schools?
Steve Coll, the dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, has published a comprehensive report on a Rolling Stone story about a brutal gang rape at the University of Virginia. The report finds the magazine fell short on multiple counts, citing faulty reporting, editing and fact checking. According to the report, Rolling Stone failed to engage in “basic, even routine journalistic practice” in reporting on an alleged rape case at UVA. Read the full report […]
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2:57 AM | The Strange History of the Student Borrower Defenses Provision
The only thing growing faster than the cost of college is the number of former Corinthian College students refusing to pay their debts. What started as a 15 person strike has now grown to approximately 100 people. The protest is raising important big-picture questions of what role the U.S. Department of Education should play in eliminating loans for potentially fraudulent educations. But its actual mechanics are being fought on a hyper-granular scale over a single provision–a […]
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12:00 AM | Are ecological conferences safe?
Conference season is upon us! We’ll get to travel, eat free food, read our emails during talks, and it’s going to be a blast. For all of us? Maybe not. INNGE coordinated a survey (that got IRB cleared and all of that, so you know it’s legit) about whether or not harassment happened during ecological meetings. Before we dive into the results and write it up as a paper, I will have a first look at the results. We asked a few different questions. First about the overall […]

April 07, 2015

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7:00 PM | Supervisor or superhero?
At the end of March I attended the 2nd International Conference on Developments in Doctoral Education and Training at Oxford University (the program is online here if you are interested). I enjoyed catching up with colleagues in the ‘hallway track’ and hearing about new stuff happening in various universities. In particular I was impressed by […]
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4:00 PM | Why I study soggy volcanoes
One of my New Year's resolutions was to talk more about my research, and I thought it would be good to start with my basic elevator speech: I study how water and heat interact in stratovolcanoes, and how that can make them unstable even if they're not erupting.
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3:58 PM | Super-bright Supernovae are Single-Degenerate?
Type Ia supernovae might be arise from single- or double-degenerate progenitor binaries. Today's papers suggests that single-degenerate progenitors might account for the extremely bright type Ia supernovae.
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2:51 PM | Seafood Safety 101: Vibrio in Shellfish
Seafood consumption is on the rise -- but so is the most important pathogen found in seafood: Vibrio bacteria.
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2:05 PM | Is Sugar in Fruit Different Than Sugar in Soda?
Is Sugar in Fruit Different Than Sugar in Soda?
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1:58 PM | Louisiana, How Can You Use Collegians as Your Debit Card?
Louisiana legislators and Governor Bobby Jindal are shutting doors on an increasing number of high school students. The percentage of Louisiana high school students crossing graduation stages is growing. More students and a greater share are enrolling in colleges and universities. Over 90 percent of these student attend an institution in Louisiana. Increases in the proportion of graduates in Louisiana are in-line with national trends, which show the country climbing to an 81 percent high school […]
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11:10 AM | New on F1000Research – 7 April 2015
Below is a selection of newly indexed and published articles on F1000Research. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts New channel: Our newest channel is on Oxygen-binding and sensing proteins, with guest editor Robert Poole. It includes a snapshot of the work presented at a [...]
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10:51 AM | Collecting, storing, analyzing, and publishing lab data
Lately, I’ve been trying to figure out how I might change the way my lab collects and handles data and carries out analyses. I think we’re doing an okay job, but I know we could be doing better –I’m just … Continue reading →
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8:02 AM | The Inspirational Role of Ecosystems in Popular Music
Nature, natural phenomena, animals and ecosystems have always inspired human beings and references to it are omnipresent in ancient and contemporary cultures. To take just a narrow example, composers and songwriters have found inspiration in Nature an uncountable number of times. Rivers, mountains, forests, sea and desert are evoked by the lyrics of songsters far from their homeland, or just carried away by the beauty of Nature they are experiencing. In “River” Joni Mitchell wishes […]
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