Posts

September 16, 2014

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8:41 PM | Nine Years After Katrina, We're Still Asking the Wrong Questions About Education
“Is the educational system better now than it was pre-Katrina?” It’s the question I hear more than any other. But the typical responses around test score growth miss how we should measure school performance in New Orleans. It’s just over nine years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August 2005, and we’re still asking the wrong questions. Rusted scissors, coins and other debris sit on the floor of an elementary school in the Lakeview neighborhood of […]
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8:24 PM | One hundred years old
Just a few years back it seemed unlikely that we would ever celebrate our centenary. We were to be rejuvenated exterminated absorbed into a new Institute.  Back in 2007 when this project was announced we expected that 2013 would be the beginning … Continue reading →
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2:49 PM | Loan Forgiveness for Teachers: Let Us Count the Ways
Back in 2007, Congress passed a law establishing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (PSLF), allowing people who work in qualifying public service jobs to receive student loan forgiveness–tax-free–after the equivalent of 10 years of payments. And with a new version of income-based repayment (IBR) implemented by the Department of Education for borrowers with loans taken out after the fall of 2007, many of those public servants are able to pay far less for those 10 years than […]
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2:46 PM | Child Care Reauthorization 20 Years in the Making Underway
Political commentators may have spoken too soon about the “do-nothing Congress.” There’s been a veritable torrent of education-related legislative activity this summer, and lawmakers wrapped up that work today with an easy ‘yes’ vote in the House on the carefully negotiated Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) reauthorization bill. The Senate passed a version of CCDBG back in March, and then sent it to the House. There’s been a quiet standoff since […]
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1:26 PM | Weecology is moving to the University of Florida
We are excited to announce that Weecology will be moving to the University of Florida next summer. We were recruited as part of the UF Rising Preeminence Plan, a major hiring campaign to bring together researchers in a number of focal areas including Big Data and Biodiversity. We will both be joining the Wildlife Ecology […]
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12:52 PM | Why Is It So Hard To Think About The Brain?
This is the abstract for one of the two talks that I gave last week in Búzios, Brazil for the SBNeC conference: “Why Is It So Hard To Think About The Brain?” The talk didn’t end up following this plan exactly, but all of the ideas are here. I had an incredible time at SBNeC […]The post Why Is It So Hard To Think About The Brain? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.
Editor's Pick
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11:36 AM | Listen to Jeremy talk about ecology and blogging on Utah Public Radio Wed. 9 am Mountain Time
I’m in Utah right now giving a couple of talks at Utah State University. Which led to me getting a very flattering invitation to tape an interview for Utah public radio. The interview will be broadcast on Wed. Sept. 16 … Continue reading →
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11:36 AM | Listen to Jeremy talk about ecology and blogging on Utah Public Radio Wed. 9 am Mountain Time (UPDATED)
I’m in Utah right now giving a couple of talks at Utah State University. Which led to me getting a very flattering invitation to tape an interview for Utah public radio. The interview will be broadcast on Wed. Sept. 16 … Continue reading →
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10:48 AM | Cambridge Union Society Debates Right to be Forgotten
In May 2014, the European Court of Justice ruling saw Google and other search engines receiving thousands of requests to remove links to certain content deemed damaging to individuals. Sir Jimmy Wales from the Wikimedia Foundation is amongst those that have spoken out at length against the ruling. In the company’s first transparency report, it […]
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4:00 AM | Nontraditional Careers: Science Policy
A doctorate in biology is preparation to do more than just bench work, said Lyric Jorgenson, a PhD who now works as Science Policy Advisor and Analyst at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "It's a degree in logic," she contends. Logic and problem solving, an interest in politics, combined with the ability to write for different audiences are essential skills for PhDs looking to make the leap into science policy. A doctorate in biology is preparation to do more than just bench work, […]

September 15, 2014

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7:25 PM | An unforgettable sendoff
After researching the coral reefs surrounding the island of Mo’orea, French Polynesia since 2009, and in my final hours on the island, I was fortunate enough to see a side of nature I had never seen before. This encounter made … Continue reading →
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6:34 PM | New on F1000Research – 15 September 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Have you had a chance to check out what our scientists think about Immediate Publication, Transparent Refereeing, No Editorial Bias, and Data Inclusion? Head on over to our homepage and see what others like [...]
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6:14 PM | Isn’t Hurting Ourselves Enough?
We alcoholics hurt people. Over and over again. We do terrible things and we victimize people over and over again. We take advantage. We behave boorishly, vilely. And we don’t seem to care about the damage we do. After all, if we cared, why would we keep repeating it? A friend asked me recently why […]
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5:32 PM | Robots that will fold your laundry This is “Brett” also known as...
Robots that will fold your laundry This is “Brett” also known as The Berkeley Robot for the Elimination of Tedious Tasks.  This guy can do simple household chores. Specifically, the robot can fold laundry and is part of an ongoing project by UC Berkeley’s Pieter Abbeel. Folding towels might seem easy to us humans, but this is actually quite complicated for a robot to do.  In fact it requires a method where the robot learns the tasks by seeing how humans do it. […]
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5:02 PM | Common Core Math Standards Add Up To Big Money for Education Companies
The politically controversial standards curriculum standards known as the Common Core have been in the headlines for months, in Louisiana and across the country. But for most teachers and educators the standards have been quietly transforming classroom instruction for years. And for textbook publishers and other vendors, the new standards add up to new business. Sarah Carr reports on the dizzying array of new education products that claim to be ‘Common Core aligned.’ When thousands […]
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4:55 PM | What U.S. Schools Can Learn From Poland
By any measure, Poland has made remarkable education progress since the fall of the Berlin Wall. On the most recent 2012 international tests of 15-year-olds, known as PISA tests, Poland ranked 9th in reading and 14th in math among all 65 countries and sub-regions that took the test. It used to be on par with the United States, a mediocre performer. In math, for example, Poland gained 2.6 points a year between 2003 and 2012 while the rest of the world, on average, remained unchanged. And on […]
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4:11 PM | Book Review: Can Pre-K Address Income Inequality?
As we at EdCentral have often written, the political buzz around pre-K is stronger now than ever. Much of this recent momentum is a result of compelling economic research suggesting that high-quality early education programs can improve children’s progress measured against a bevy of different academic and social indicators stretching to—and beyond—high school graduation. High-quality pre-K can improve these students’ adult earnings and their likelihood of […]
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3:40 PM | Who Isn’t an Impostor?
Last week I attended the last day of the British Science Association‘s Festival in Birmingham. There was a real buzz about the place and it had clearly been an extremely successful few days. I enjoyed hearing Ineke de Moortel – … Continue reading →
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1:30 PM | Knitting and programming
Two things that I do almost every day are programming and knitting. Programming allows me to implement experiments and analyze the results, and knitting allows me to unwind and recharge, restoring some of the mental energy that activities like programming require for me. Programming is analytic and something that Silicon Valley geniuses do a lot; knitting is […]
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12:00 PM | Vocabulary, teaching, and being understood
English is a crazy language, with an exceptional number of grammatical conventions, and required exceptions to the conventions. And that doesn’t even explain the senselessness of pronunciation. There are many ways of saying the same thing, with different shades of meaning. By choosing words carefully, we can increase accuracy and precision of meaning. This can present a dilemma…
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11:35 AM | Detection probabilities, statistical machismo, and estimator theory
Detection probabilities are a statistical method using repeated sampling of the same site combined with hierarchical statistical models to estimate the true occupancy of a site*. See here for a detailed explanation including formulas. Statistical machismo, as I define it … Continue reading →
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10:33 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: De Anna Beasley
De Anna Beasley discusses her work as an insect ecologist, studying the effects of environmental stress on insect development and function.
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6:58 AM | Simultaneous Enrollment
The Crimson has an op-ed on simultaneous enrollment, that I agree with.Harvard does not like simultaneous enrollment, which means a student taking two classes that meet at the same time -- any time overlap counts (whether the whole class or half an hour once a week).  If you want to take a class via simultaneous enrollment, you have to petition the Administrative Board, and your professor is supposed to provide direct hour-per-hour instruction for the class you can't intend.  As […]
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4:00 AM | Celldance 2014 Announces Microscopic Blockbuster Commissions
It will be a triple feature, short but powerful, says Duane Compton. The three "Tell Your Own Cell Story" videos just commissioned by ASCB's Celldance Studios will feature eye-popping live cell imaging and scientific storytelling, according to Compton, who chaired the Celldance selection panel. The panel today announced the names of the ASCB members from whom videos have been commissioned and the cell stories they plan to tell. Illustration by Johnny Chang, ASCBIt will be a triple feature, […]
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3:52 AM | thejunglenook: Look at the scientists on tumblr!!gradmom,...
thejunglenook: Look at the scientists on tumblr!!gradmom, evopropinquitous, and thejunglenook ! So awesome to meet thejunglenook and @gradmom at @ASPvoice (that’s the twitter tag)! Primatology on Tumblr FTW!!!!
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2:13 AM | Editorial board of “Journal of K-Theory” on strike, demanding Tony Bak hands over the journal to the K-Theory foundation.
Text of the announcement below: Dear Colleagues, We the undersigned announce that, as of today 15 September 2014, we’re starting an indefinite strike. We will decline all papers submitted to us at the Journal of K-Theory. Our demand is that, as promised in 2007-08, Bak’s family company (ISOPP) hand over the ownership of the journal to the K-Theory Foundation (KTF). The handover must […]

September 14, 2014

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11:05 PM | Learning the art of conferencing
The start of the new academic year marks the end of my second conference season. I attended two conferences; Evolution 2014 in Raleigh, North Carolina and the British Ecological Society Macroecology meeting at the University of Nottingham. They were at the opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of size and specificity but they were both interesting, useful and, most surprisingly for me, enjoyable. The difference is that I knew what to expect. Last summer was my first taste of conferences along […]
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7:04 PM | Popular neuroscience book suggestions
Neuroscience isn’t really my thing, so when my teenage daughter came asking for suggestions of a good popular book on the subject I took to Twitter. Several people kindly made suggestions, while others asked to be notified of the outcome … Continue reading →

September 13, 2014

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4:44 PM | Highlights from the installation speech of UBC’s 13th President, Arvind Gupta
Here are excerpts from the speech of Arvind Gupta at his official installation as UBC’s 13th president. Canada’s post-secondary system should take notice. “We recognize UBC as a Place of Mind, but also as a place of shared cultures, traditions, and … Continue reading →

September 12, 2014

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10:41 PM | Jellyfish flames in space fuckyeahfluiddynamics: The...
Jellyfish flames in space fuckyeahfluiddynamics: The jellyfish-like light show in the animations above shows the life and death of a flame in microgravity. The work is part of the Flame Extinguishment Experiment 2 (FLEX-2) currently flying aboard the International Space Station. When ignited, the fuel droplet creates a blue spherical shell of flame about 15 mm in diameter. The spherical shape is typical of flames in microgravity; on Earth, flames are shaped like teardrops due to the […]
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