Posts

November 05, 2014

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1:57 PM | Coins In Space
Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Robert Lasson, director of creative services in NC State’s Fitts Industrial and Systems Engineering Department. Using 3D printers, NC State engineers created the official NC State University […]
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1:16 PM | Redefining parameters & priorities
When I moved to a new city and new job, I had this vision of the things I would do with my newfound time and cash flow. It was rooted in the things I’d done outside work over the past … Continue reading →
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10:00 AM | iGEM: Wake up to the sleeping sickness!
Welcome back to the second installation in our iGEM series, brought to us by Anamaria Cubja who is going to tell us all about what it is the team have actually been doing. Stay tuned for the next blogpost where we’ll find out how it actually went at MIT! Wake up to the sleeping sickness!…
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6:13 AM | OYM 53: Everyone’s doing mTOR
We’re gearing up for our trip to SfN!  On Your Mind will be in the exhibitor area with our very own booth this year from November 15 through the 19th so, if you’re going to be there and want to say hi and/or talk science, stop on by!  Or drop us a line at oympodcast@gmail.com It’s ...read more The post OYM 53: Everyone’s doing mTOR appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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2:49 AM | Trainees as easy open access cannon fodder
Ladies and gentlemen, I have nothing against Open Access publishing. In fact, I take steps to ensure all my lab's publications are available to anyone, either in published or preprint form. I am happy to get our science out to as many people as possible and agree that open science is the way forward. So […]
Editor's Pick
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1:28 AM | The Island of California One of the most famous cartographic...
The Island of California One of the most famous cartographic errors in history (dating back to the 16th century), the Island of California refers to the misconception that the Golden State was separated from the rest of North America. UCLA’s Clark Library has an antique globe (circa 1695) that clearly shows the error. This is how California was depicted on maps for over 100 years. See what else UC has in its archives →

November 04, 2014

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10:56 PM | What do Darwin, penguins, poop, fire, and sheep have in common? A crowd-funding quest(ion)
It’s no secret that science funding rates are, in a word, abysmal*. As a pre-tenure faculty member, this has been weighing heavily on my mind, and I’ve devoted a substantial portion of my year to grant writing (fingers crossed!). There’s a running joke that you typically get funded to do […]
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10:15 PM | The Halloween 'Sexy' Treatment Goes Horribly Awry, Again
Halloween is that wonderful, fun time of year every possible professional or existential quality and can be reduced down to a (mildly to incredibly) offensive "sexy" costume for young women. Some professions, however, are rather more likely to generate outrage than others. And so I give you: the sexy PhD graduate (right). According to an article at Inside Higher Education: The “Delicious Women's Phd [sic] Darling Sexy Costume,” sold by Amazon, received a lot of virtual eye […]
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8:01 PM | The research inside your lunch Before you bite into your turkey...
The research inside your lunch Before you bite into your turkey (or tofurkey?) sandwich today consider where each of those ingredients came from. UC has helped improve these food items: Whole wheat bread - UC has played a key role in field testing wheat breeding lines, enabling growers to select varieties with high yield, increased drought tolerance, disease aversion and are high in protein - all of which improve pasta and bread-making quality. Tomatoes -  Researchers in the 1940s […]
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7:06 PM | For Boys, Present Laws Can't Substitute for Absent Fathers, and I Should Know
Editor’s Note: Son of a Saint is a support group for boys whose fathers are incarcerated or dead. At the organization’s annual gala Nov. 1, Hechinger Report columnist Andre Perry delivered a keynote speech in which he revealed that as a child, he faced the same situation as the boys helped today by this group: Good evening family. My lovely wife and I thank Sonny Lee and the boys of Son of a Saint for asking me to be the keynote for tonight’s important event. I’m deeply […]
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3:05 PM | What Have I Done Here?
I’ve been blogging for coming up on 6 years. Countless hundreds of pages of mostly crap, spun out over more than half a decade of sobriety and various life events. A divorce. A career involving two jobs a thousand miles apart. Some academic successes. Some failures. Physical and emotional changes. A new romance. Life. But […]
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2:05 PM | Curious about what your NSF PO is doing right now?
Many of you are waiting to hear back from NSF right now. Full proposal panels in DEB and IOS have met and your fate is sealed... though you don't know what it is yet. IOS Program Officer, Michelle Elekonich, guest blogged here two years ago and in Part 3, gave a run down of the funding […]
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1:57 PM | Upcoming meetings – Cerebrovascular physiology
There are two upcoming meetings that will definitely be of interest for those interested in cerebrovascular physiology research… The Brain and BrainPET 2015 meeting will take place in Vancouver, Canada, from June 27th-30th, 2015. For more information: Brain 2015 The Fifth International Meeting on Cerebral Haemodynamic Regulation (CARNet meeting) will be held in Southampton, UK, […]
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1:51 PM | Science Stars Sparkle In Special MBoC “Quant Bio” Issue
Cell biology is expanding, fusing with physics, coalescing with computational modeling, and bonding with bioinformatics. Yesterday Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) rolled out a special quantitative biology issue, its first-ever “extra” edition, to encompass the broad new horizons of cell biology. The new issue features so many big names from cell biology and biophysics that, if “Quantitative Biology” were a Hollywood blockbuster, the science paparazzi would […]
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1:02 PM | Antibody Validations; where companies and scientists unite for more reliable antibody resources
Antibodies: the most frequently used research tool in the lab Antibodies are one of the most used tools in any life sciences laboratory; a survey conducted by The Scientist in 2012 revealed that 88% of laboratories use research antibodies. It is therefore not surprising that the market for antibodies and the number of companies [...]
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12:00 PM | Intersectionality: The Importance of Acknowledging Diverse Experiences to Make STEM More Inclusive
Fay Cobb Payton recently published a book on what can be done to make STEM more inclusive. We sat down to talk with Payton about the book, her work, and why STEM diversity matters for both the research community and the corporate world.
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11:23 AM | Anybody out there teaching a successful intro biostats course? Tell us about it!
This is a bleg.* A while back I asked your help in choosing a textbook for an introductory biostats course I co-teach. We settled on Whitlock & Schluter, which fits our needs quite well. The course covers a pretty traditional … Continue reading →
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9:28 AM | Android phones and tablets: capabilities, limitations and upgrades
The devices that keep me connected, organised and productive when I’m out of the office are almost entirely Android in flavour. I currently use an Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone (overdue an upgrade, but more on that later) and a Google Nexus 7 tablet. My S3 will be 2 years old in January, and the Nexus […]
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8:30 AM | Is the sexist scientific workplace really dead?
A recent study claims that low numbers of women in senior academic science are due to choices made in childhood by girls, not anything to do with the environment at work. Can this be true?Newspapers are full of stories about the sexist workplace and there is no reason to think the scientific profession should be any different. So it was quite surprising to read a headline in the New York Times claiming Academic Science isnt Sexist. The article by Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci is a brief […]
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1:02 AM | Crypto Word Search
The puzzle below can be defined as a Crypto Word Search. Guess what needs to be done in this puzzle. The answer is a word. The hidden words are: DUKE, EYES, RUSE, WORD, WUSS. The idea of a crypto word search came to me from a beautiful, but devilishly difficult, puzzle In the Details, designed […]

November 03, 2014

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10:11 PM | "Copper is an essential metal, but too much will cause problems. I want to see if the environmentally..."
“Copper is an essential metal, but too much will cause problems. I want to see if the environmentally relevant levels of copper in drinking water will have any impacts on the brain and its functions.” - UC Merced Professor Masashi Kitazawa Read more about his research that examines whether copper plays a role in Alzheimer’s Disease. (via ucmerced)
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8:45 PM | Voices
One of the advantages of being “Beyond the PhD” is having enough time to do all of those things I used to want to do when all of my time was taken up by writing up. After handing in my corrections, and … Continue reading →
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7:52 PM | What to do if you’re facing tenure denial
A nontrivial fraction of tenure-track faculty are denied tenure, well over the standard 5% threshold for Type I errors that we use in the sciences. Even though academia has a love for self-scrutiny, we overlook the consequences of tenure denial. Tenure denial is not rare, but thoughtful information about tenure denial is rare. Since I wrote…
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7:30 PM | Teach For America, Public Relations, and the Haunting Specter of Education Conspiracies
It’s Halloween, that cursed day when spooks and apparitions lurk around darkened corners and the line between real and fantasy blurs for a moment. To a degree, every day is Halloween in education policy. Conspiracies and evil spirits haunt coverage of the Common Core State Standards, state assessment contracts, and most any reform efforts. But a story published this week in The Nation traces out a particularly fantastical yarn about Teach For America (TFA). Most of the article is […]
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6:05 PM | ucsciencetoday: Can’t beat the view from ucsc's Long Marine...
ucsciencetoday: Can’t beat the view from ucsc's Long Marine Laboratory. The lab provides a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary research on marine life, coastal conservation, water science, and climate change impacts. See more locations where University of California minds are at work. 
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3:00 PM | Open Access Week roundup
We had quite a few online events during Open Access Week (October 20-26), and some of our discussions are archived online. If you’d like to watch and listen to our interviews about Open Access in the Global South, or read the Reddit thread about the future (or lack thereof…) of journals, you can visit [...]
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1:58 PM | On Beyond.
Yesterday, in a fit of madness, I decided to see what would happen if I ran half a marathon and then just kept running. I was going out for what was supposed to be 10 miles, and I just felt really good. It was a cold, very windy day. I found myself running into 30 […]
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12:49 PM | New on F1000Research – 3 November 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4in] Michelle R. Sanford, Anthony J. Cornel, Catelyn C. Nieman, Joao Dinis, [...]
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11:45 AM | This Is What Science Looks Like at NC State: Rebecca Goulter
Rebecca Goulter talks about being a microbiologist and why she loves studying viruses that threaten human health.
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11:42 AM | A hypothesis about why some ecologists don’t like “pure theory”
As we’ve discussed several times (e.g., this comment thread), ecologists as a whole may be increasingly skeptical of the value in “pure theory”, meaning theory that is at best only loosely connected to “reality” or “nature”. The evidence for that … Continue reading →
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