Posts

March 01, 2015

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1:00 AM | Is it Time for a Student Debt Revolt?
The escalating problem of American education debt has concerned pundits in this country for many years. Politicians make minor policy changes periodically to avoid calamity but the long-term trends remain the same. College costs more every year, students and families borrow more and more every year, and graduate (or drop out) starting their working lives saddled with ever higher debt burdens. Some students are pushing back, by just refusing to pay their loans. According to an article in the […]

February 28, 2015

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5:07 PM | IQTELL
So now and then I write about my workflow. Since email is the most important reason for diversion of my attention and often hard to handle due to the enormous amount of emails. This enormous amount of emails mostly caused by no or little email etiquette by some. Even email rules only helps a little. […] Related posts:Email Overload Evernote and “Read It Later” The Google+ Song
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9:34 AM | What are the Unsolved Problems of Neuroscience?
In an interesting short paper just published in Trends in Cognitive Science, Caltech neuroscientist Ralph Adolphs offers his thoughts on The Unsolved Problems of Neuroscience. Here's Adolphs' list of the top 23 questions (including 3 "meta" issues), which, he says, was inspired by Hilbert's famous set of 23 mathematical problems: Problems that are solved, or soon will be: I. How do single neurons compute? II. What is the connectome of a small nervous system, like that of Caenorhabi

February 27, 2015

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11:18 PM | The Organization and Execution of a Postdoc-Run Symposium
Name: Sarah Mazzilli, PhD, Boston University Date: October 2-3 2014 Locat...
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10:52 PM | Arizona State Univeristy: More Troubles in White Students Learning About Whiteness
Yet again we have an example of the disaster that can develop when colleges attempt to teach white people about being white. Back in 2013 a professor at a Minnesota community college faced sanctions for her “actions in [targeting] select students based on their race and gender,” that occurred when she taught a class about structural racism. Now, according to this piece over at Talking Points Memo: Officials at Arizona State University probably weren't expecting the full […]
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6:30 PM | Superconductors: trains and cons
“We have 30 minutes of ratchet fighting in supermarkets, 15 minutes of bloody images of war and 20 minutes of sports. What are we doing in the two-minute long science section? I like that superthing. Super sounds good. They’ll love it.” — Every night news producer Superconductors are one of those sciency-sounding headline makers with…
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3:45 PM | Open Science News – 27 February 2015
It was a busy week for Open Science, so these are just some of the highlights we came across. What drives academic data sharing? An article by researchers from Berlin concludes that “research policies that better incentivise data sharing are needed to improve the quality of research results and foster scientific progress” Henry Chesbrough, [...]
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1:00 PM | Recommended Reads #47
Gain a rare look into the brain trust at Nature to understand how they pick manuscripts for review. Quiz: North Korean Slogan or TED Talk Sound Bite? One journal bans null hypothesis significance testing. That’s right, they’ve banned the P value. A look back on the time when a columnist for Parade magazine (the celebrity rag that comes with…
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11:13 AM | Friday links: the culture of dish-doing, death to inferences, #hipsterscience, and more (UPDATED)
Also this week: the mission (impossible) of public research universities, who cares if the evidence for X is “growing”, journal editor pet peeves, timely advice for grad school recruitment visits, and more. From Meg: This is a fantastic fake article … Continue reading →
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9:07 AM | Land – spare or share?
The debate on what is better for the environment and by extension many ecosystem services, high intensity conventional farming using large amounts of fertiliser and pesticides on mostly homogenous areas or low intensity possibly organic farming in a heterogeneous landscape seems to be a no-brainer. High intensity farms are pressing into natural habitats, pesticides are impacting pollinators and natural pest controls such as beetles or spiders (Hole et al., 2005, Biological Conservation) and the […]
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6:23 AM | Why Can’t a Woman be more like a Man?
Last autumn there were some shocking figures released by the Royal Society regarding the new cohort of University Research Fellows (URFs): only two out of 43 were women. Many of us were very disappointed and depressed by these figures. I … Continue reading →

February 26, 2015

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10:30 PM | ucsciencetoday:You just never know where ucresearch will turn...
ucsciencetoday:You just never know where ucresearch will turn up! In this case, UC San Diego structural engineering Ph.D. candidates set out to Florence, Italy at the invitation of the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo to conduct a structural “health assessment” of the Baptistery of St. John. The structure was completed in 1128 and was the site where the Italian poet Dante and many other notable Renaissance figures were baptized.Using LiDAR (light detection and ranging) […]
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7:36 PM | Why ASAP Could Harm Some Students
The City University of New York’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) has gotten a great deal of positive attention in the last few years, and for good reason. The program provides much-needed additional economic, advising, and social supports to community college students from low-income families, and a new evaluation of a randomized trial from MDRC found that ASAP increased three-year associate’s degree completion rates from 22% in the control group to 40% in the […]
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6:00 PM | How is a cell like a nightclub?The cell is adapted to deal with...
How is a cell like a nightclub?The cell is adapted to deal with compounds in the environment. You can think of cells as nightclubs. The line of people waiting to get into the club can be thought of as substances in the cell’s environment. So a cell really needs to constantly be considering what is allowed in such as nutrients for growth or what it needs to eliminate such as toxins. The mechanism of the cell that does this is called a drug transporter and these can be thought of as the […]
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4:35 PM | NC3Rs publication bias workshop
Earlier this week I attended (and spoke at) a workshop about publication bias, organised by NC3Rs – the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research. This group is interested in the publication bias issue because using animals in research adds an extra responsibility to publish all of the results [...]
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3:09 PM | Career Hiccoughs, Acceptance, and Anxiety.
Last night I got my seven-year coin.   The topic at the meeting (my men’s discussion meeting) was acceptance. And I talked about something that has been provoking anxiety and I simply have to accept. My boss is moving on. He’s staying with the organization, but being promoted into a different department. I like my […]
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2:02 PM | The secret recipe for successful working group meetings?
As Meg noted recently, science is increasingly involving working groups. This is the big science aspect I discussed a while back in a lengthy footnote (and distinct from big data). Although the original (at least in ecology) synthesis center at NCEAS is … Continue reading →
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1:01 PM | A naturalist and his moquitoes
This is another in the “meet the lab” series – here’s a feature by MSc student Chris Cloutier: I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t fascinated by the world of creepy crawly things. For as long as I have been able to grasp and crawl I have been collecting and observing insects and spiders. […]
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1:00 PM | On being wary of bringing straight-A students into the lab
I had a conversation a couple months ago about the fact that I’m a bit wary of taking Straight-A students into my lab as research students. Here’s an explanation. A couple weeks ago, I saw and linked to an article about the predictors of success in grad school. Among those who were accepted to a fancy school, college GPA…
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12:08 PM | Learn more and earn benefits with the Certification for Librarians Program
Calling all Librarians! How would you like to learn more about Mendeley, certify your skills, and, in return, receive a free premium Mendeley upgrade for up to 500 users at your institution? Today we launched our Certification for Librarians Program, which is a structured, self-paced, self-study program that takes 15- 20 hours to complete with rewards offered […]
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12:07 PM | Meet the Platform Team — Part II!
We profiled part of our Platform team last month, but as it is our largest team here at Mendeley, we had to break it up into two parts. To be honest, we profiled the team in three parts, with the API team taking the lead back in August. Why is the team so big? Because […]
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8:53 AM | Our lab is recruiting!
We are welcoming applicants to the Photonics Research Laboratory. We are looking for Bachelors students in their 3rd year or graduate (MS/PhD) students who have strong fundamentals and who are highly motivated. Neither advanced level optics background nor experimental technique knowledge are necessary. We will train you. You may send your application to me: Dr. […]
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5:00 AM | Plotting spatially explicit networks (in the oceans)
One of the projects I am working on at the moment involves interactions between marine species. We know the geographic position for each species, and their interactions. What we wanted to come up with, is a way of showing interactions on the map, to look at the biogeographic structure of this network. But the thing is, because we are talking about sea-living species, it makes no sense for the interactions to go over land. Fishes from the Pacific don't walk all the way through South America to […]
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1:54 AM | OYM66: Life of PI with Dr. Michael Nestor
    Our guest this week is Dr. Michael Nestor (mnestor@hussmanautism.org), a researcher at the Hussman Institute for Autism in Maryland who’s calling in from behind a wall of snow to talk neuroscience, science communication, and the path from PhD student to PI, with Liam and Kat. The OYM hosts have had opposing experiences with ...read more The post OYM66: Life of PI with Dr. Michael Nestor appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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12:33 AM | ucsdhealthsciences:Think of an EyeIn this macro close-up of a...
ucsdhealthsciences:Think of an EyeIn this macro close-up of a human eye, two major elements are visible: the pupil and the iris. The pupil, of course, is the central aperture through which light passes to strike the retina. It appears dark because light rays entering the pupil are either absorbed by tissues inside the eye directly or absorbed after diffusely bouncing around inside the eye, with very little of the light escaping the same way it came in. The pupil is a marvel, but it’s […]

February 25, 2015

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6:46 PM | On trainees, money, and diversity
Money — it’s the crux of just about everything we do in science.  Want to bring in a new student or staff member? Money.  Want to do field or lab work? Money. Want to go to a conference? Money. It’s … Continue reading →
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6:02 PM | Can an awe-inspiring view boost the body’s immune...
Can an awe-inspiring view boost the body’s immune response? Awe is the feeling of being in the presence of something vast that transcends your understanding of the world. Early in human history, awe was reserved for feelings toward divine beings – e.g., gods.In 1757, a revolution in our understanding of awe began thanks to Irish philosopher Edmund Burke. In A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Burke detailed how we feel the sublime […]
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2:11 PM | A Few Spanish Treats.
The trip to Spain was absolutely stellar. I can’t begin to describe how beautiful everything was. Seville’s Alcázar was the architectural highlight. But we saw so many things! Like the Palacio Real in Madrid.   And Seville’s absurdly large cathedral. Like, really ridiculously large. And of course, Ronda’s “New Bridge”, which is difficult to comprehend. […]
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12:16 PM | Congratulations February Advisor of the Month!
Congratulations and thank you to Prof. Dr. Javier Alba-Tercedor! Javier only recently became a Mendeley Advisor, but has been incredibly helpful leading seminars at the University of Granada, where he is a Professor of a Zoology, to helping with Alpha and Beta testing of our forthcoming Android app. We also believe he is the first […]
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11:45 AM | How do you make figures?
Continuing on my stats and figure theme from last week, I’m curious as to how most of our readers make figures. I drafted this post before those posts appeared, and had no idea how common my approach of moving figures … Continue reading →
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