Posts

July 30, 2014

+
6:54 PM | More efficient ways to lower CO2 The term carbon capture is...
More efficient ways to lower CO2 The term carbon capture is talked about as a way to battle against climate change, but what exactly is it?  This recent NY Times video does a great job explaining it. Basically, when a power plant burns fossil fuel such as coal, it releases gas into the air.  Carbon capture technology can single out the CO2 molecules in this gas before it leaves the smokestack.  The current process is to spray a chemical on the gas to separate the carbon dioxide […]
+
5:41 PM | Richard Dawkins doesn’t speak for me…so, who does?
Richard Dawkins is at it again. This isn’t the first time he’s made inappropriate or offensive comments, and this infographic nicely illustrates the perpetual cycle of eye-rolling and submission as the people who call him out get fed up and ultimately disengage. What frustrates me so much about Dawkins is that […]
+
2:30 PM | Advocating for Open Science as an Early Career Researcher
Erin McKiernan is a researcher in experimental and computational neuroscience. You can follow her on Twitter @emckiernan13 F1000Research is the first journal that goes beyond open access, by practicing both open data sharing and open peer review. Sharing information in an open manner leads to a better scholarly environment by, among other things, promoting [...]
+
1:50 PM | Label Makers.
I am an alcoholic. I claim that label, because it’s true. I am an alcoholic in recovery. I use “recovering”, “recovered”, and “in recovery” interchangeably. Some people in AA argue about the use of particular terms. In particular, some people object to “recovered” because it sounds too final, and we live a day at a […]
+
1:28 PM | A Prison Dilemma
I am currently on holiday. You can tell this because I’m writing, reading and otherwise doing things that I regard as fun. In particular I’ve been catching up on some reading. I’ve been meaning to read Danah Boyd‘s It’s Complicated for some time (and you can see some of my first impressions in the previous post) but I had held off because I wanted to buy a copy. That may seem a strange statement. Danah makes a copy of the book available on her website as […]
+
12:10 PM | Bringing static research figures to life
We have all heard people repeatedly pointing out that scholarly publishing has hardly changed since the first scientific journal article in 1665 and is still done largely within the constraints of a printing press. This is true on many levels including the humble figure. The latest article published in F1000Research by Björn [...]
+
11:36 AM | #ESA2014 bingo!
The bottom-left corner is pretty much a free cell.Filed under: Just for fun, Meeting previews and reviews
+
11:30 AM | Meet the Product Team!
We often have users writing to us describing Mendeley as a sort of religious experience — we see a lot of exclamation points here at Mendeley. So it may sound a bit clinical to describe Mendeley as a “product,” but everything the Product Team does here at Mendeley leads to creating the tool you know and love (exclamation […]
+
10:30 AM | Urbanization: Good for Pests, Bad for Trees
Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Steve Frank, an assistant professor of entomology at NC State.The post first appeared on Frank’s blog, Insect Ecology and Integrated Pest Management. My wife is from a neighborhood outside Baltimore called Lawyers Hill. This is where, in the 18th century, lawyers (and I assume doctors and other
+
7:00 AM | Women, antibiotics and the Longitude Prize | Athene Donald
Athene Donald: Times have changed since the first Longitude Prize and women now form an important part of the scientific workforce. Can the resultant diversity help to find creative solutions to this challenge prize?Across the world many leaders are speaking out about the challenges our global society faces as antibiotic resistance grows and our medical arsenal to defeat infection shrinks. In the last few months the World Health Organization (WHO), David Cameron and Sally Davies (the UKs Chief […]
+
4:00 AM | Lydia Villa-Komaroff Learned in the Lab “What It Might Be Like to Fly”
"I grew up in a very big family in a very small house," says Lydia Villa-Komaroff. That house was in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where few Mexican-American kids like herself were lucky to even finish high school. But Villa-Komaroff knew from a young age that she wanted to become a scientist. She remembers when she was nine, hearing her uncle talking about his work as a chemist and deciding that this sounded like the career for her. "All children are scientists, but... I think it gets lost because […]

July 29, 2014

+
9:34 PM | Resource post: Tools for better colors
Looking through my list of bookmarks, it’s apparent that something I like to read about (other than food) is design. The reason? I believe that well-made, attractive visuals are worth the effort when they help make a point clearer and more memorable. In a sea of plots and diagrams (or in a room full of posters), you want people to notice and remember yours. One aspect of this process is finding the right color scheme, which can involve several questions: How much (if any) color is […]
+
6:21 PM | Why a New Jersey School District Decided Giving Laptops to Students is a Terrible Idea
Inside Hoboken’s combined junior-senior high school is a storage closet. Behind the locked door, mothballed laptop computers are strewn among brown cardboard boxes. Others are stacked one atop another amid other computer detritus. Dozens more are stored on mobile computer carts, many of them on their last legs. That’s all that remains from a failed experiment to assign every student a laptop in this northern New Jersey suburb of New York City. It began five years ago with an […]
+
4:13 PM | A group of seniors is part of a UCSF study on how being in a...
A group of seniors is part of a UCSF study on how being in a choir may help aging adults.
+
2:40 PM | Report: 31 Million Americans Have College Credits, But No Degree
At a time when policymakers are struggling to increase the proportion of Americans with college and university degrees, more than 31 million people have already accumulated credits but quit without graduating, a new report shows. And while a third of those left after as little as a single term, about 21 million spent more than a term on campus before giving up on their higher educations, according to the research, from the National Student Clearinghouse. More than four million have at least two […]
+
1:21 PM | Now from Then.
Today I start my fifth decade of life. I don’t think I have anything remarkable to say about it. I am now a middle-aged man living in a large city on the East Coast of the United States. I have a partner who lives in another nearby city, whom I love deeply and loves me. […]
+
12:55 PM | This Is What Science Looks Like At NC State: Àngels de Luis Balaguer
Editor’s note: This post was written by Àngels de Luis Balaguer, a postdoctoral researcher in plant biology at NC State (who also earned her Ph.D. in electrical engineering at NC State). The post is an entry in an ongoing series that we hope will highlight the diversity of researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
+
12:28 PM | “Back to the Future of Money” David Birch Talks@Mendeley
Where does the money in a £20 note actually exist? It’s the sort of thing you don’t often think about. Unless, of course you’re an expert like David Birch, whose day job is heading a consultancy specializing in secure electronic transactions, and who’s also just published a book called “Identity is the New Money.” He […]
+
11:37 AM | Poll: how do you calculate sums of squares in an unbalanced ANOVA?
Inspired by, and related to, Meg’s recent poll on how you interpret interaction terms and main effects in ANOVA, I thought I’d ask my own ANOVA-related questions: Part of the reason I’m asking these two questions is that different stats … Continue reading →
+
4:00 AM | Celldance Extends “Tell Your Own Cell Story” Video Proposal Deadline
Microscopic movie moguls have two more weeks to submit their "Tell Your Own Cell Story" proposal to ASCB's Public Information Committee (PIC), which will commission three live cell imaging videos at $1,000 each to be shot on location in the labs of ASCB members. The new deadline is August 15. The deadline for Celldance proposalshas been extended to August 15.Poster by Johnny Chang, ASCB.Microscopic movie moguls have two more weeks to submit their "Tell Your Own Cell Story" proposal to ASCB's […]

July 28, 2014

+
10:22 PM | Special Education Law in Need of an Overhaul
New America’s Clare McCann writes on The Hill that lawmakers have constructed a formula that creates significant disparities in federal special education funding to school districts. She writes, The fact that states are receiving such inequitable IDEA allocations to afford education for one of the country’s most vulnerable populations should serve as evidence that lawmakers need to take action to update and revise the formula and rid it of those disparities. States and local […]
+
8:34 PM | "There is no creature more revered in American politics than the moderate voter. Unlike the..."
“There is no creature more revered in American politics than the moderate voter. Unlike the ideologues and partisans destroying politics, the moderate is free of cant and independent of party. She yearns for politicians who get along, who govern reasonably and incrementally, who steer a course between the extremes of the left and the right. …The only problem is moderates are largely a statistical myth — and efforts to empower them may, accidentally, lead to the rise of more […]
+
7:40 PM | New on F1000Research – 28 July 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Featured article: Epiphyte response to drought and experimental warming in an Andean cloud forest [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3le] Previously titled: Epiphyte response to drought and experimental warming PUBLISHED: 06 June [...]
+
5:06 PM | US Educators Lead the World in Overestimating Student Poverty, Which May Affect Educational Mobility
AndreSource: Andreas Schleicher OECD Do educators’ perceptions of how disadvantaged their students are matter? Put another way, when teachers think their students are underprivileged, do they have lower expectations for them, and do their students achieve less at school? In a July 22, 2014, article “Poverty and the perception of poverty - how both matter for schooling outcomes,” Andreas Schleicher, director of education and skills at the Organization for Economic […]
+
3:47 PM | How We Feel. What We Do.
Lately, I am feeling slow and stupid and lazy and ill at ease. Discontent. Fraudulent. Useless. I’m feeling angry and irrelevant. Uncreative. Dull. I am supposed to have ideas and be interesting. I am supposed to be engaging and dynamic and focused. I am not any of those things right now. Sludge and bituminous, sessile […]
+
12:30 PM | The consequences of being powerful
An Atlantic article, Being Powerful Distorts Time Perception recently caught my attention. The article discusses a few studies that induced feelings of power in a lab setting in order to observe different time-related cognitive consequences. The first suggested that the more power people have, the more available time they perceive they have. The authors attributed the […]
+
12:00 PM | Remetaphoring the “academic pipeline”
We need to ditch the “academic pipeline” metaphor. Why? The professional destinations of people who enter academic science are necessarily varied. We do not intend or plan for everybody training in science to become academic researchers. The pipeline metaphor dehumanizes people. The people who leave the so-called pipeline don’t like being called drips. The pipeline…
+
11:00 AM | Unusual uses of technology for ecological studies
Last year, I attended the defense talk of Jasmine Crumsey, who is now a postdoctoral researcher at Cornell University. Her PhD dissertation focused on the impacts of exotic earthworms on soil carbon dynamics. Her work is notable because of what … Continue reading →
+
9:30 AM | Open access: effective measures to put UK research online under threat?
The universities of the UK should not squander the opportunity to put in place an effective mechanism for making their published research freely availableA great deal of water has passed under the bridge in the two years since the UK government reinvigorated its push towards open access making publicly funded research papers freely available online. Although there is broad agreement on the policy, vociferous debates have raged over the details of implementation. Should the UK policy favour […]
+
6:01 AM | Productivity by the Numbers
As summer reaches to the end of July, thoughts begin to turn toward a new fall semester of classes, activities and students for many of us. Now is a great time to spend a few moments and take a look … Continue reading → The post Productivity by the Numbers appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
123456789
270 Results