Posts

September 02, 2014

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12:37 AM | Catching Up, Part I: Meeting with Former Research Students at ASM in Boston in May.
You know, I keep meaning to post more often.  Then, as John Lennon famously observed, "Life is what happens when you are busy making plans."  So I am trying to post in a more regular fashion. Lots and lots to do, as is true for most of us; life is a juggling act. I have two courses this Fall semester:  one is my normal and much beloved Microbiology course (which I continue to want to call "Microbial Diversity," since I only get the one chance to promote Microbial […]

September 01, 2014

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3:32 PM | New on F1000Research – 1 September 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. First of all, we hope you’ve all had time to check our our brand new homepage design. This new design includes not just the weekly featured article, but also regularly [...]
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12:00 PM | Links Roundup #23
Note that this is an extra Links Roundup article. I have simply gathered too much stuff, and must publish another roundup in order to get “caught up”. Enjoy! Design Hackdesign is a web site that offers 44 lessons in design.  … Continue reading → The post Links Roundup #23 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.
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11:44 AM | Improving Long-term Healthcare with Crowdfunded Community Partnership
  Collaboration and community are at the heart of bringing research to life in ways that make a real difference to people’s lives, specially when it comes to advances in healthcare. So this time we give a shout out to an interesting crowdfunding project that was launched yesterday to try and do just that: By […]
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3:25 AM | August lives up to its definition: respected and impressive
The things we noticed in and around canine science over the past two weeks, Storified in one neat location for your convenience:[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16-31 August 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Feuerbacher E.N. (2014). Shut up and pet me! Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer petting to vocal praise in concurrent and single-alternative choice procedures, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2014.08.019 Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of […]

Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of statistics for testing cognitive judgement bias, Animal Behaviour, 95 59-69. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.06.013

Arnott E.R., Claire M. Wade & Paul D. McGreevy (2014). Environmental Factors Associated with Success Rates of Australian Stock Herding Dogs, PLoS ONE, 9 (8) e104457. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0104457

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August 31, 2014

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8:57 PM | The Replication Crisis: Response to Lieberman
In a long and interesting article over at Edge, social psychologist and neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman discusses (amongst other things) the ‘replication crisis’ in his field. Much of what he says will be of interest to regular readers of this blog. Lieberman notes that there has been a lot of controversy over ‘embodied cognition‘ and social […]The post The Replication Crisis: Response to Lieberman appeared first on Neuroskeptic.
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8:37 PM | Street signs
My sister and I had very active imaginations when we were kids. We acted out plays with our stuffed animals, pretended we were time travellers, and frequently visited Narnia – but what we really loved was solving mysteries. Fuelled by … Continue reading →

August 30, 2014

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5:33 PM | Research on Making Policy Reforms Work for Dual Language Learners
If there’s any unifying thread in the story of the last several years of education debates, it’s that policy changes are education reform’s first, not final, steps. Given American education’s unwieldy, chaotic governing institutions, legal and regulatory changes are almost always susceptible to being watered down—or even reversed. For instance, while it seemed like a settled victory when the Common Core State Standards were adopted by 46 states, recent […]
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12:12 PM | The Myth Of “Roid Rage”?
Are men who inject testosterone and other anabolic steroids at risk of entering a violent “roid rage“? Many people think so. Whenever a professional athlete commits a violent crime, it’s not long before someone suggests that steroids may have been involved. The most recent example of this is the case of Jonathan “War Machine” Koppenhaver. […]The post The Myth Of “Roid Rage”? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Lundholm L, Frisell T, Lichtenstein P & Långström N (2014). Anabolic androgenic steroids and violent offending: Confounding by polysubstance abuse among 10,365 general population men., Addiction (Abingdon, England), PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25170826

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August 29, 2014

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8:01 PM | Are "Affordable Elite" Colleges Growing in Size, or Just Selectivity?
A new addition to this year’s Washington Monthly college guide is a ranking of “Affordable Elite” colleges. Given that many students and families (rightly or wrongly) focus on trying to get into the most selective colleges, we decided to create a special set of rankings covering only the 224 most highly-competitive colleges in the country (as defined by Barron’s). Colleges are assigned scores based on student loan default rates, graduation rates, graduation rate […]
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8:00 PM | The Misguided #PayMyTuition Challenge
In a sort-of piggy back on the famous ALS Ice Bucket Challenge going on now, many college students are working on a challenge of their own. It’s called the #PayMyTuition challenge. According to a piece at Inside Higher Ed: Students… have taken to Twitter… [and] challenging various celebrities to help finance their higher education. There are lots of requests to the usual suspects -- President Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, etc. Also there have been some notable responses. At […]
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6:45 PM | Summer 2014
It’s been an interesting summer so far (although the weather would suggest it’s coming to an end already). I’ve only attended the one conference, Eurodim 2014 (reported on earlier), I’ve had an interesting London trip (with another one coming up), and I had my annual pilgrimage to the GBBF a couple of weeks ago (also […]
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6:10 PM | Transfer Students Are Losing Time and Money
As I explained over on The Hill today, a new report from the Department of Education confirms that nearly 40 percent of students who transferred colleges at least once lost all of the credits they’d earned in the process. That’s a significant issue, given that almost a third of college students transfer schools at least once after enrolling. I wrote, For state and federal policymakers, those lost transfer credits translate into lower college attainment […]
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3:12 PM | Going to a For-Profit College Doesn't Help at All When Looking for Job
I’m sure most people have seen this advertisement by now . I’m talking about Red Socks, the really rather charming commercial featuring a man going about his day before ending with his big job interview While red socks are in general not quite appropriate job interview attire, we can forget about that for a minute. The marketing campaign suggests Phoenix graduates have entered some sort of exclusive fraternity that helps them get the job because now they’re in this select […]
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2:40 PM | Open Science News – 29 August 2014
This week’s round-up of open science news: It’s Back To School season, and you, too, can get back in the (virtual) school benches with two free online courses that cover open science: Open knowledge: changing the global course of learning (Stanford OpenEdX, Sept 2 – Dec 12) Open Research (P2PU.org, registration closes Sept [...]
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2:38 PM | Stolen Dance
No summary available for this post.
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1:45 PM | More Research On Precisely What Works for English Language Learners
As I’ve pointed out in recent posts, there are considerable limits to what education research can do on its own—because of political realities and implementation challenges. Of course, that doesn’t mean that we should stop researching education, or that we should ignore existing research findings. It just means that we should: 1) be mindful of the limits of what research can do for politics and policy, and 2) even the best research usually has limited prescriptions for policy […]
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11:30 AM | Friday links: Lego academics vs. admin, ESA vs. other summer conferences, greatest syllabus ever, a taxonomy of papers, and more
Also this week: Contrarianism! Academia isn’t broken! It’s not actually that important for the vast majority of data to be made available and accessible in a standardized form! And also lots of things that aren’t contrarianism but are still thought-provoking! … Continue reading →
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3:42 AM | Shout-out to Sabeti Lab
A shout-out today to my friend and colleague Pardis Sabeti (and her lab) for their Science article on the Ebola virus that appeared earlier today.  Pardis and her group have been studying the genetics of viral diseases, and in particular the Lassa virus.  So they were there and ready when the recent Ebola virus began and went to work.  They sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from 78 patients, and have analyzed the resulting information to gain insight into how the disease is […]

August 28, 2014

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5:13 PM | ucladailybruin: usclibraries: A woman and a Chevrolet at the...
ucladailybruin: usclibraries: A woman and a Chevrolet at the future site of UCLA’s Westwood campus in 1926. Part of the Dick Whittington Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library. #TBT Throwback Thursday? This is probably as far back as we could go for UCLA…
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5:00 PM | Today's College Freshmen Were Born in 1996, and Other Unsettling Facts
Today in Things That Make You Feel Old, Beloit College this week released its annual "mindset list" of who today’s college freshmen are and what their perception of the world is. The list has come out every year since 1998. This year most of the freshmen were born in 1996. For them: Tupac Shakur, JonBenet Ramsey, and Carl Sagan have always been dead. Their first weeks of kindergarten were interrupted by the World Trade Center explosions of September 11th. Hard liquor has always been […]
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3:29 PM | What Makes Charter Schools Work?
As politically polarizing as charter schools can be, doubts about their efficacy are being steadily put to rest. There’s increasing evidence that they can drive impressive academic gains for students—especially in the presence of strong accountability regulations. But because of the polarized politics surrounding them, charter schools are often misrepresented and misunderstood. So I’ve written a piece for The Daily Beast about what makes charters distinct—and […]
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3:22 PM | Meet the API Team!
Keeping science open has always been part of Mendeley’s mission. There are many ways we achieve this, but our developer portal throws opens the Mendeley platform for developers to create and build tools to make researchers’ lives easier using Application Programming Interfaces — known as APIs. It is thanks to the Mendeley API that some of your […]
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1:59 PM | Website redesign
Today we launched a new design of part of our website, including the homepage and navigation menu. Please have a look, and let us know in the comments below what you think. A few of the changes: Chinese-language homepage. If you’re accessing our website from China or other Chinese speaking countries, you [...]
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1:59 PM | A Strange Turn into Research Policy.
Twitter is a fascinating, self-contradictory place for scientists. A huge and robust community. By turns enlightened and enlightening, ruthlessly orthodox, whimsical and humorless, unified and fragmented, quixotic and hypocritical, absolutist and relativist. Just as it is impossible to pin down any individual to a label-board, so the community of scientists and academics on twitter defies […]
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12:57 PM | Women In Science: The Untold Downside to Achievement
Throughout my PhD years, I have worked passionately on the issue of "Women in Science." Becoming the president of the Graduate Women in Science Organization (GWIS) at Florida State University gave me an opportunity to work on building connections between young professional women and those who were already well advanced in their careers. During GWIS meetings, we discuss the challenges faced by women in science and talk about personal experiences. As women in science finally move up to […]
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11:19 AM | Spiders self-amputate legs after wasp stings
Firstly, once again I find myself apologising for not writing more regularly. I WILL become better at this! I’ve been somewhat engrossed in writing up a report for my dreaded first year PhD appraisal, but on the way I have … Continue reading →
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11:13 AM | Cities as a Glimpse of the Future
How researchers learned that cities may serve as a crystal ball for the impact of climate change on an important insect pest.
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11:00 AM | Do you allow laptops in class?
As we gear up for the start of the semester (we don’t start until next week), I am once again considering whether to allow laptops in class. My recent musings on this were sparked by Anne Curzan’s post in the … Continue reading →

August 27, 2014

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11:35 PM | (False?) Positive Psychology Meets Genomics
Academic bunfight ahoy! A new paper from Nick Brown – famed debunker of the “Positivity Ratio” – and his colleagues, takes aim at another piece of research on feel-good emotions. The target is a 2013 paper published in PNAS from positive psychology leader Barbara Fredrickson and colleagues: A functional genomic perspective on human well-being. The […]The post (False?) Positive Psychology Meets Genomics appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Brown, N., MacDonald, D., Samanta, M., Friedman, H. & Coyne, J. (2014). A critical reanalysis of the relationship between genomics and well-being, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407057111

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