Posts

August 29, 2014

+
2:38 PM | Stolen Dance
No summary available for this post.
+
1:45 PM | More Research On Precisely What Works for English Language Learners
As I’ve pointed out in recent posts, there are considerable limits to what education research can do on its own—because of political realities and implementation challenges. Of course, that doesn’t mean that we should stop researching education, or that we should ignore existing research findings. It just means that we should: 1) be mindful of the limits of what research can do for politics and policy, and 2) even the best research usually has limited prescriptions for policy […]
+
3:42 AM | Shout-out to Sabeti Lab
A shout-out today to my friend and colleague Pardis Sabeti (and her lab) for their Science article on the Ebola virus that appeared earlier today.  Pardis and her group have been studying the genetics of viral diseases, and in particular the Lassa virus.  So they were there and ready when the recent Ebola virus began and went to work.  They sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from 78 patients, and have analyzed the resulting information to gain insight into how the disease is […]

August 28, 2014

+
5:13 PM | ucladailybruin: usclibraries: A woman and a Chevrolet at the...
ucladailybruin: usclibraries: A woman and a Chevrolet at the future site of UCLA’s Westwood campus in 1926. Part of the Dick Whittington Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library. #TBT Throwback Thursday? This is probably as far back as we could go for UCLA…
+
5:00 PM | Today's College Freshmen Were Born in 1996, and Other Unsettling Facts
Today in Things That Make You Feel Old, Beloit College this week released its annual "mindset list" of who today’s college freshmen are and what their perception of the world is. The list has come out every year since 1998. This year most of the freshmen were born in 1996. For them: Tupac Shakur, JonBenet Ramsey, and Carl Sagan have always been dead. Their first weeks of kindergarten were interrupted by the World Trade Center explosions of September 11th. Hard liquor has always been […]
+
3:29 PM | What Makes Charter Schools Work?
As politically polarizing as charter schools can be, doubts about their efficacy are being steadily put to rest. There’s increasing evidence that they can drive impressive academic gains for students—especially in the presence of strong accountability regulations. But because of the polarized politics surrounding them, charter schools are often misrepresented and misunderstood. So I’ve written a piece for The Daily Beast about what makes charters distinct—and […]
+
3:22 PM | Meet the API Team!
Keeping science open has always been part of Mendeley’s mission. There are many ways we achieve this, but our developer portal throws opens the Mendeley platform for developers to create and build tools to make researchers’ lives easier using Application Programming Interfaces — known as APIs. It is thanks to the Mendeley API that some of your […]
+
1:59 PM | Website redesign
Today we launched a new design of part of our website, including the homepage and navigation menu. Please have a look, and let us know in the comments below what you think. A few of the changes: Chinese-language homepage. If you’re accessing our website from China or other Chinese speaking countries, you [...]
+
1:59 PM | A Strange Turn into Research Policy.
Twitter is a fascinating, self-contradictory place for scientists. A huge and robust community. By turns enlightened and enlightening, ruthlessly orthodox, whimsical and humorless, unified and fragmented, quixotic and hypocritical, absolutist and relativist. Just as it is impossible to pin down any individual to a label-board, so the community of scientists and academics on twitter defies […]
+
12:57 PM | Women In Science: The Untold Downside to Achievement
Throughout my PhD years, I have worked passionately on the issue of "Women in Science." Becoming the president of the Graduate Women in Science Organization (GWIS) at Florida State University gave me an opportunity to work on building connections between young professional women and those who were already well advanced in their careers. During GWIS meetings, we discuss the challenges faced by women in science and talk about personal experiences. As women in science finally move up to […]
+
11:19 AM | Spiders self-amputate legs after wasp stings
Firstly, once again I find myself apologising for not writing more regularly. I WILL become better at this! I’ve been somewhat engrossed in writing up a report for my dreaded first year PhD appraisal, but on the way I have … Continue reading →
+
11:13 AM | Cities as a Glimpse of the Future
How researchers learned that cities may serve as a crystal ball for the impact of climate change on an important insect pest.
+
11:00 AM | Do you allow laptops in class?
As we gear up for the start of the semester (we don’t start until next week), I am once again considering whether to allow laptops in class. My recent musings on this were sparked by Anne Curzan’s post in the … Continue reading →

August 27, 2014

+
11:35 PM | (False?) Positive Psychology Meets Genomics
Academic bunfight ahoy! A new paper from Nick Brown – famed debunker of the “Positivity Ratio” – and his colleagues, takes aim at another piece of research on feel-good emotions. The target is a 2013 paper published in PNAS from positive psychology leader Barbara Fredrickson and colleagues: A functional genomic perspective on human well-being. The […]The post (False?) Positive Psychology Meets Genomics appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Brown, N., MacDonald, D., Samanta, M., Friedman, H. & Coyne, J. (2014). A critical reanalysis of the relationship between genomics and well-being, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407057111

Citation
+
7:05 PM | Whose Responsbility? It’s too Easy to Say ‘Not Mine’
Despite the news being full of stories about how minorities are disadvantaged in larger or smaller ways, it is far from obvious that rapid progress is being made. The articles I read are full of appropriate shock at everything from … Continue reading →
+
7:01 PM | Recommended reads #34
Here is an especially gorgeous and fascination-inducing natural history site called Corner of the Cabinet. This essay called Change the Tenure System came out at the start of the year but was just brought to my attention. I think it’s the most concise and spot-on definition of the problems and false assumptions built into how…
+
6:01 PM | Three Things You Didn’t Know About the Arachnids That Live on Your Face
Right now, in the general vicinity of your nose, there are at least two species of microscopic mites living in your pores. Scientists have just published a study about these little-known mites.
+
5:44 PM | Update on SOCG and ACM
I am happy to have an update on the SOCG/STOC colocation issue that arose last week.  Or, better said, Jeff Erickson has an update, the short summary of which is that it looks like there has now been some very useful clarification.  The concerns of the ACM apparently are limited to direct financial support, and the conferences can (formally) co-locate.  I encourage you to read the note on Jeff's blog from Paul, and let me echo Jeff's statement here: "Needless to say, this […]
+
5:01 PM | Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers...
Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find Violent protests can often be unintentionally provoked by aggressive law enforcement tactics like approaching demonstrators in riot gear or the use of military-style formations, according to a team of researchers at UC Berkeley. "Everything starts to turn bad when you see a police officer come out of an SUV and he’s carrying an AR-15," said Nick Adams, a sociologist and fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute for Data Science who […]
+
2:37 PM | The hardest part of a professor's job
Professor. It's a term used to cover a wide swath of job in the US, from people who strictly teach undergraduates to soft money researchers. The spectrum of people, jobs, situations and career options makes the title a grab-bag of many things. At each end of the spectrum you have jobs that are nearly, if […]
Editor's Pick
+
1:18 PM | Co-Chaperone Keeps Close Watch on Mice Sperm Production
Chaperones aren't just for high-school homecoming dances. Cells have chaperones as well, chaperone proteins that ensure newly made proteins are properly folded. If protein folding goes awry, diseases associated with misfolded proteins such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can arise. But if one set of chaperones can throw a wet blanket on a school dance, imagine a second set of co-chaperones just to keep the chaperones in check. That's the growing picture in cellular chaperoning as folding […]

Rogon, C., Ulbricht, A., Hesse, M., Alberti, S., Vijayaraj, P., Best, D., Adams, I., Magin, T., Fleischmann, B. & Hohfeld, J. & (2014). HSP70-binding protein HSPBP1 regulates chaperone expression at a posttranslational level and is essential for spermatogenesis, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25 (15) 2260-2271. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-02-0742

Alberti S, Böhse K, Arndt V, Schmitz A, Höhfeld J. (2004). The Cochaperone HspBP1 Inhibits the CHIP Ubiquitin Ligase and Stimulates the Maturation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 15 (9) 4003-4010. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E04-04-0293

Citation
+
12:00 PM | It’s nice to have administrators you can trust
Last week, our campus had its back-to-school events. Our administrators talked about their big plans. There was one Thing that the President talked about for a few minutes. The Provost talked about the same Thing for a half hour. My Dean talked about It for about twenty minutes. When I had lunch next to my…
+
11:46 AM | Is there any way to avoid having to write all-new assignments every term for the classes I teach?
Ok readers, I give you plenty of advice, so now it’s payback time! :-) I need your help, with a problem I suspect many of you have: is there any good way to avoid writing all-new assignments every term for … Continue reading →
+
10:22 AM | Congrats August Advisor of the Month — Vicky Pyne!
Congratulations and thank you to Vicky Pyne! Vicky recently participated in a video for our Women in STEM series (you can see these stories on our YouTube channel, including some of our own Mendeley employees), and we loved her passion for the topic, both as a medical student and someone with a decade of experience of […]
+
1:00 AM | Laureate Fellowship
I received the exciting news last week that I have been awarded a Laureate Research Fellowship from the Australian Research Council. I flew to Adelaide on Friday for the Awards Ceremony, which was held at St Peter's College in Adelaide. This was an impressive venue, looking like it had been teleported through time from the 19th century.  I also learnt that St Peter's has more Nobel Prize winning graduates (3) than any secondary school outside of New York.I'm now the proud owner of an […]

August 26, 2014

+
10:23 PM | I'd Rather Black, Superhuman Student-Athletes Just Be Human
What happens when prep athletes take off their uniforms? The same black males who are beloved heroes on schools’ playing fields can be treated as violent trespassers off of them. Between being a celebrated superhero and a profligate thug, black students just need to be seen - as human. Last week, Jackie Robinson West became the first all black Little League team to win the American title and to advance to Little League World Series. My heart raced like my sons played on Jackie Robinson […]
+
10:18 PM | Lessons from Hawaii: Tracking the Right Data to Fix Absenteeism
Good school attendance is associated with all sorts of good educational outcomes, especially higher grades and higher test scores. It’s obvious: if you’re not showing up for school, you’re not going to learn as much. But only 17 states track and report chronic absenteeism data, according to the Data Quality Campaign and Attendance Works, a non-profit organization that advocates for more focus on absenteeism data and ideas for getting students to come to […]
+
10:15 PM | The Tensions Between Pre-K Politics and Research
With the federal government rancorously gridlocked for the last four years, some folks have taken to a familiar—and understandable—way of expressing their frustration. Why, they ask, can’t politicians just “listen to the research?” Why must every policy argument descend into ideological bickering when we already know what works? We especially hear this a lot in the early education world. The tension between democracy and expertise is a longstanding theme. […]
+
10:14 PM | New Article on arxiv on Equitability and MIC
We recently put on arxiv a new draft on "Theoretical Foundations of Equitability and the Maximal Information Coefficient".  This is some follow-on work to a paper that appeared in Science a couple of years ago, where we introduced the idea of equitability.  Essentially, in that Science paper (link to page where you can access the paper), we wanted a statistic that would give back, for samples from a noisy functional relationship, a score corresponding to the amount of noise (or, […]
+
5:30 PM | UC Berkeley’s Early Warning System Beat Napa Earthquake by...
UC Berkeley’s Early Warning System Beat Napa Earthquake by 10 Seconds Ten seconds before the San Francisco Bay Area started shaking early Sunday morning, an experimental system in a UC Berkeley lab sounded an alarm, counting down to the impending earthquake. The system works through an array of sensors near the fault line which calculate the severity of the quake and broadcast a warning. It might not seem like much, but even a few seconds notice could allow utilities to shut off gas […]
123456789
280 Results