Posts

October 21, 2014

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2:32 PM | The Top 10 Martin Gardner Scientific American Articles
The “Mathematical Games” column in Scientific American that began in January 1957 is a legend in publishing, even though it’s been almost 30 years since the last one appeared. The... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 15, 2014

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10:06 PM | Lifestyle Choices Could Affect Gene Sequences that Code for Cancer
It’s no secret that diet and exercise can directly impact our health. But for many people, genetic predisposition to disease – be it hypertension or diabetes or cancer – is often perceived as a risk... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 10, 2014

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7:12 PM | Disease Detectives Investigate Outbreaks at Home and Abroad
The medical sleuths of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been thrust into the limelight with the recent Ebola epidemic. Charged with chasing diseases and stopping outbreaks, they’re... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 09, 2014

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3:21 PM | Play, Informal Learning Cultivate Kids’ Interest in STEM
When I was eight years old I couldn’t speak English. I’d been born in another country and came to the U.S. because my father’s postdoctoral medical research brought us here. Frustrated with my... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 08, 2014

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2:58 PM | The Hallmarks of Cancer 9: Reprogramming Energy Metabolism
The Hallmarks of Cancer are ten underlying principles shared by all cancers. You can read the first eight Hallmarks of Cancer articles here. The ninth Hallmark of Cancer is defined as... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 06, 2014

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5:44 PM | Scientists Team Up to Talk about Climate Change
As many as 400,000 people voiced their concern about climate change during the People’s Climate March in New York City on September 21. Held just before the United Nations Climate Summit, the march... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 04, 2014

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11:00 AM | How the Ansari X Prize Altered the Trajectory of Human Spaceflight
Looking up into the bright Mojave sky in 2004, I strained to keep my eyes on the tiny spaceship 50,000 feet up. “Three, two, one… release, release, release!” came the call over the loudspeakers. I... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 26, 2014

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8:32 PM | A Guardian “Agent” to Protect You From Digital Fraud
Today, maintaining privacy without guided assistance is an onerous task, whose initial costs are high, immediate rewards low and solutions fragile and constantly evolving. The moment after perfectly... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 25, 2014

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7:41 PM | Hybrid Corals: Sex Gone Awry or Saving Grace?
As the full moons of late summer and fall rise, so too, does the libido of threatened staghorn (Acropora cervicornis) and elkhorn (Acropora palmata) corals. Awakened from a year of sexual slumber,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 24, 2014

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6:45 PM | Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight
Bob Dylan asked: “Are birds free from the chains of the skyway?” Sure, this is a metaphor (in Dylan’s case, for a lost love) but it works because the complexities of avian flight—from migration and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 23, 2014

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3:04 PM | Ig Nobel Prizes Make You Laugh, Then Think
  CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—What happens in the brains of people who see Jesus in a piece of toast? What are the physics of slipping on a banana peel? Are people who see an ugly painting more... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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