Posts

September 19, 2014

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8:30 PM | The 28th Santa Fe Symposium on Jewelry Manufacturing Technology
The 28th annual Santa Fe Symposium® was held from 18th–21st May 2014 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, and attracted another large attendance of delegates from 15 countries worldwide, representing a good cross-section of those involved in jewellery manufacturing from mass manufacture to specialised craft operations. In general, many were finding the market is tougher now... The post The 28th Santa Fe Symposium on Jewelry Manufacturing Technology appeared first on Johnson Matthey […]
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7:40 PM | Harvard Business School, Heal Thyself
Recently I wrote about a study performed by Harvard Business School assessing the way American business leaders feel about inequality in America. Somewhat surprisingly, HBS alumni indicated it's a problem. As a piece at Al Jazeera put it, alumni believed that “the weaknesses in elements that drive prosperity for the average American indicate that the American economy requires a strategy in order to do its full job." But former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich has an interesting […]
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6:07 PM | More jets from Rosetta's comet!
Another lovely view of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko contains jets. Bonus: Emily explains how to use a flat field to rid these glorious Rosetta NavCam images of faint stripes and specks.
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6:00 PM | Mother Nature Sets the Tune in Cell Biology, Walter Tells Lasker Awards Ceremony
Mother Nature made an unexpected appearance this afternoon at the Lasker Awards luncheon in New York City when Peter Walter of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and ASCB President Elect for 2016, described her as a mix of biological referee, evolutionary trickster, and puzzle mistress. "In biology, Mother Nature presents the playing field, and it is our task to decipher how it works," Walter declared. "Disconcertingly, Nature deploys the strategy of random walk, of mutation and […]
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5:57 PM | Banana peel slipperiness wins IgNobel prize in physics
Cartoons taught us that banana peels make for a slick trip to the floor, but scientists decided to find out just how slippery they could be.
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5:46 PM | Read Slower and You'll Grow Smarter
You can handle 30 minutes a day reading, and your brain will thank you for it. Read Slowly to Benefit Your Brain and Cut Stress Once a week, members of a Wellington, New Zealand, book club arrive at a cafe, grab a drink and shut off their cellphones. Then they sink into cozy chairs and read in silence for an hour.JEANNE WHALEN Mindful reading improves your brain power  Mines the "Slow Reading Club" of New Zealand to illustrate the value of silent, individual reading.Notes that […]
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5:30 PM | iPhone eye test spots vision problems cheaply
A cheap iPhone accessory that measures your glasses prescription brings eyecare to the places where it is most needed
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5:00 PM | Einstein makes an appearance in superheavy chemistry
A chemical compound using superheavy element seaborgium is the first to show effects linked to Einstein's theory of relativity
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4:49 PM | Free will persists (even if your brain made you do it)
If neuroscientists were one day able to predict your every action and decision based on brain scans, will you abandon the concept of free will? Probably not
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4:37 PM | Flying into LA this morning, I waded from the mountain’s...
Flying into LA this morning, I waded from the mountain’s beach into the cloud sea
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4:30 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: 6 solar strangenesses, US drone zones open, Ig Nobels, Apple Watch, ants vs spiders, epileptic poetry and more
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4:19 PM | Milky Way map swirls with 219 million stars
The most detailed map of our galaxy ever made reveals the incomprehensible majesty of our neighbourhood
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3:45 PM | Not all the ‘baby friendly’ rules are rooted in science
The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative has a noble goal of encouraging breastfeeding, but some of its recommendations may be based on shaky science.
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3:30 PM | Video chat in US jail shelved over concerns for inmates
Dallas County Jail lost its bid to install "video visitation" equipment after concerns were raised that in-person visits would be restricted
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3:15 PM | For these monkeys, more dietary fiber is a bad thing
Loss of protein could lead to significant declines in primate populations
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3:04 PM | Improving Nutritional Status to Support Eye Health: Reading, Listening, Acting
Of the five senses, sight and sound are the most important for learning. While all senses are important,  many people particularly fear the loss of eyesight. Boyers and colleagues sought to determine if scientific effort is an accurate reflection of the global burden of eye and vision disease. Their detailed examination of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews found gaps in the literature. Age-related diseases (cataract, glaucoma and macular degeneration) received the most […]
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3:01 PM | Scotland's scientists breathe easier after No vote
Scientists in Scotland are largely relieved by the outcome of the Scottish independence referendum, believing science to be safer in a united kingdom
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2:55 PM | Quick-change materials break the silicon speed limit for computers
Faster, smaller, greener computers, capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently available models, could be made possible by replacing silicon with materials that can switch back and forth between different electrical states.
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2:43 PM | Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.
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2:30 PM | Epilepsy gives woman compulsion to write poems
To whom shall I compare thee? A woman with epilepsy has a rare condition – the constant urge to write poetry, which may shed light on creativity
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1:54 PM | Stricter rules will thwart Japan's whaling attempts
From now on, Japan will have to work much harder to convince the world that its "scientific whaling" should be allowed to continue
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1:08 PM | Gaze-tracker lets you connect to devices with a glance
A headset computer that knows where you're looking can connect you to your devices or to other people with just a look and a nod
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12:28 PM | Startup scales up graphene production, develops biosensors and supercapacitors (w/video)
An official of a materials technology and manufacturing startup based on a Purdue University innovation says his company is addressing the challenge of scaling graphene production for commercial applications.
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11:58 AM | Zoologger: Ants fight dirty in turf war with spiders
In the forests of eastern Australia, a squadron of social spiders faces off against an army of the world's most dangerous ants in a pitched battle for survival
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11:38 AM | Nuovi segni per la materia oscura
Vi ricordate l’Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (Ams)? Be’, il cacciatore di antimateria (e non solo, qui un ripassino sulle caratteristiche della missione), dopo i segnali resi noto lo scorso anno infatti, potrebbe aver visto ancora qualcosa di interessante. Ams  – sostanzialmente un rivelatore di particelle provenienti dai raggi cosmici, montato sulla Stazione spaziale internazionale – avrebbe rivelato nuovi indizi […]
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11:12 AM | FDA approves Lilly’s GLP-1 diabetes drug Trulicity
The once-weekly treatment is set to compete with Bydureon, Tanzeum and Victoza
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11:12 AM | Apple's smart watch could have us all self-monitoring
With its finger on your pulse, the Apple Watch will spawn a new generation of apps to monitor health, fitness and perhaps even emotions
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11:11 AM | Aurora expands its team with three new hires
Claire Mosley, Kristen Barrett and Joe Balfour join the London comms agency
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10:52 AM | NICE fast-tracks GSK's skin cancer drug Tafinlar
But only on condition the company cuts its price
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10:33 AM | Some inmates should have the right to euthanasia
Should convicted prisoners facing life behind bars get the right to die on the grounds of their tortured existence? Sometimes, says physician Christian Brown
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