Posts

August 01, 2014

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10:35 PM | Dawn Journal: Not-So-Quiet Cruise
Dawn's Mission Director updates us on the status of the mission, and tells us what Dawn and Star Wars have in common.
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9:54 PM | Comparative Investigations on Platinum Cluster Salts
To evaluate future applications of metallic clusters in nanoscience and nanotechnology, the electronic properties of the high-nuclearity carbonyl anionic platinum cluster [Pt19(CO)22]4– were investigated using two different organic cations. In particular, N,N'-diethyl viologen dication (Vio2+) and N,N'-dimethyl-9,9'-bis-acridinium dication (Acr2+) were employed as counterions, oxidising agents and characterisation probes. The reactions of [Pt19(CO)22]4– tetra-n-butylammonium salt, […]
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8:19 PM | On-chip topological light
First measurements of transmission and delay.
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7:00 PM | Siberian crater mystery may be solved
Thawing permafrost probably burped a ground-breaking methane bubble that ripped the huge hole in the Yamal peninsula.
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6:40 PM | Seven facts and a mystery about hand, foot and mouth disease
Hand, foot and mouth disease is a viral illness that most kids get before age 5. Several different viruses cause the condition, which causes blisters and fevers.
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6:08 PM | FBI errors throw forensic convictions into question
The FBI has admitted that its scientists may have made erroneous statements in thousands of criminal cases involving hair analysis
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6:00 PM | Common Core Has a Messaging Problem. It Also Has a Real Problem.
Recently Stephanie Simon over at Politico wrote that opposition to the Common Core State Standards Initiative, a project to bring state curricula into alignment and improve the quality of American education by requiring common, high-level examinations, is escalating because Common Core advocates have been “fighting emotion with talking points.” But things might get better because advocates will now change their focus in order to ...get Americans angry about the current state of […]
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5:21 PM | The reasons why Gaza's population is so young
High birth rates and low employment among women make Gaza a demographic enigma in the modern world
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5:12 PM | Possesive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs Emotion researchers...
Possesive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs Emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct — not seen in all human cultures and not fundamental or hard-wired in the same ways that fear and anger are. A current study by UC San Diego professor Christine Harris is the first experimental test of jealous behaviors in dogs. The findings support the view that there may […]
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4:45 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: how dinosaurs became birds, search for white possums, gadgets for the next Mars rover, the truth about fat and sugar and more
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4:35 PM | Thin diamond films provide new material for micro-machines
Researchers were able to tune the intrinsic stress of thin-filmsby optimizing the grain boundary materials and the thickness of the films. This opens the door for using diamond for fabricating advanced MEMS devices.
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4:30 PM | Uganda court strikes down antigay law opposed by scientists
Activists fear that the law could still be reinstated
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4:30 PM | U.K.'s 100,000 Genomes Project gets £300 million to finish the job by 2017
National Health Service aims to become genomic medicine pioneer
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4:21 PM | Definitely an Opportunity (and Need) for Daily Multivitamin-Mineral Supplement
The CDC released statistics from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010. The good news is that youths are eating fruit regularly: 91.7% of 2-5y olds, 82% of 6-11 y olds, and 66.3% of 12-19y olds. The bad news is that this includes those eating ONLY ONE fruit serving daily.
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3:59 PM | okkultmotionpictures: EXCERPTS >|< Life History of a...
okkultmotionpictures: EXCERPTS >|  | Hosted at: Internet Archive A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Life History of a Mosquito, a video showing life cycle of Aedes Aegypti: microphotography of eggs; larva, pupa and then adult mosquito emerging; female and male breeding. Made in 1928 by Kodak Research Laboratories, in co-operation with the Dept. of Bacteriology of the Medical School, University of Rochester. We invite you to watch the full video HERE BONUS scary skeeter stuff: […]
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3:38 PM | Winning photos reveal fairy-tale worlds on Earth
Swim through a park submerged under a swollen lake and cower beneath a supercell storm cloud with these award-winning photos
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3:31 PM | pbsdigitalstudios: Happy summer! The science of sweat, sunburns...
pbsdigitalstudios: Happy summer! The science of sweat, sunburns and wrinkly fingers #2: Dancing #4: Mer-man #7: Chernobyl Joe
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3:16 PM | Extinct mega penguin was tallest and heaviest ever
A fossil foot bone found in Antarctica suggests that one extinct species of penguin was a true giant, clocking in at 115 kilograms
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2:40 PM | A crab across the decades: the changing face of scientific illustration
When I recently published a paper (full text on DoctorZen.net) about finding a sand crab (Lepidopa websteri) where it hadn’t been before, I wrote about the images of the crab I found in a nature center. But I got thinking about how this crab has been shown in scientific papers.The scientific literature on this crab is the almost only place where you will find images of it. A search of Google Images reveals only one page with pictures of the species (a googlewhack!) and that’s in […]
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2:13 PM | Monsters of the Pleistocene
Sloths the size of elephants. Fish with menacing fangs. A rhinoceros with a horn so comically large that some believe it inspired the first unicorn stories.  In short, ice age animals were weird. These creatures lived during the Pleistocene era, roughly 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago, a period during  which the Earth went through multiple ice ages. Despite the harsh climate the megafauna thrived. Some looked like oversized versions of animals living today, while others were just […]
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2:13 PM | Watch "Lunar Bridgehead," a Wonderfully Campy 1964 Film about Ranger 7
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has released a 1964 documentary on Ranger 7 in honor of the spacecraft's fiftieth anniversary.
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2:01 PM | Fat and sugar: Diet of confusion
In the debate over food and health, it is too soon to absolve fat and demonise sugar. Some nutritional clarity is urgently needed
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1:39 PM | A Look at Mississippi's Request to End Cheating, with Tests Included
Last week, the Mississippi Department of Education requested $1 million from the state legislature to combat cheating on statewide examinations. The request comes on the heels of alleged cheating systems The Clarion-Ledger wrote about at Clarksdale’s Heidelberg Elementary School earlier this year. Thereafter the state’s education department spent $300,000 to hire Utah-based consultant Caveon Test Security to investigate the Heidelberg case. The case comes amid a spate of cheating […]
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1:26 PM | Surrounded by Messy School Reform and "Drama" on the Streets, a Newark Girl Tries to Land on Her Feet
NEWARK, N.J. -- Nydresha is a small girl with big dreams about Hawaii. In her dreams, the 12-year-old and her mother live in a beach house. There is peace, and there is quiet. There is no drama, no abandoned houses and no cursing -- not even by Nydresha herself. She curses sometimes in real life but always feels badly about it afterwards. Nydresha’s mother, known on the streets as Lil’ Bit for the tiny stature she passed on to her only child, likes how the girl thinks. She’d […]
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12:15 PM | La proteina che guida la plasticità delle cellule
Per difendersi dagli stress meccanici e per migrare all'interno del nostro organismo le cellule hanno bisogno di essere plastiche, cioè di cambiare forma, modificando all'occorrenza la struttura della loro membrana. Una ricerca pubblicata su Cell e condotta da Ifom (Istituto Firc di oncologia molecolare) e dall’Università degli Studi di Milano ha individuato ora le basi molecolari di questa capacità. Si tratta di Art, una proteina già nota per il suo ruolo […]
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12:00 PM | Fist bumps spread fewer bacteria than handshakes
Fist bumping spreads far fewer bacteria than a handshake or a high five, a new study shows.
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11:00 AM | Feedback: A whole world of TweetTM
Fruitloopery sans frontières, the offence of juxtaposition, a quantum-encrypted village, and more (full text available to subscribers)
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10:52 AM | FDA approves Boehringer COPD spray Striverdi Respimat
Licence from US regulator will also allow it to treat chronic bronchitis or emphysema
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9:58 AM | US fast-tracks Ebola vaccine trials as outbreak spreads
NIH brings forward human trials as concerns mount
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9:37 AM | Un party ai feromoni
Immaginate di essere a Londra, in un bar all'ultimo grido. Siete circondati da un gran numero di persone che girovagano intorno a voi, respirando a pieni polmoni il contenuto di alcune buste di plastica. Cosa contengono? Magliette, anche leggermente puzzolenti, indossate per tre giorni di seguito senza usare deodorante o profumo. No, non stiamo descrivendo uno di quegli strani, insensati sogni che a volte capita di avere. Si tratta dei famosi “pheromone party”, l'ultima moda in […]
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