Posts

October 23, 2014

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12:11 AM | Comet’s Mars Buzz - NASA Scientist’s ‘Need To...
Comet’s Mars Buzz - NASA Scientist’s ‘Need To Know’ NASA scientist Dr. Michelle L Thaller tells Space.com’s @MiriKramer what you need to know about comet Siding Spring’s fly-by, its implications for the Red Planet and how humans will be able to observe it. Full Coverage: http://goo.gl/0cnCEb By: Video From Space.

October 22, 2014

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11:22 PM | The Election of 1896 Explained If you are in a United States...
The Election of 1896 Explained If you are in a United States history course and you don’t know about this critical election between William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan then come test day, you best be staying home son. By: Keith Hughes.
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10:33 PM | Linear Momentum Paul Andersen explains how the linear momentum...
Linear Momentum Paul Andersen explains how the linear momentum is equal to the product of the mass of an object and the velocity of the center of mass. He uses video analysis software to calculate the velocity of an object and therefore the linear momentum of the object. By: Bozeman Science.
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9:43 PM | The Microwave: Where did it come from? Today, microwave ovens...
The Microwave: Where did it come from? Today, microwave ovens are a common sight in kitchens across the world — but who invented them? Tune in to learn how Percy Spencer accidentally struck upon the Stuff of Microwaving Genius. By: How Stuff Works.
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8:54 PM | The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology: Crash Course...
The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology: Crash Course World History №212 by thecrashcourse: In which John Green talks about the methods of writing history by looking at some of the ways that history has been written about the rise of the West. But first he has to tell you what the West is. And then he has to explain the Rise of the West. And then he gets down to talking about the different ways that historians and other academics have explained how the West became dominant in the […]
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8:27 PM | Is a milk by any other name just as nutritious?
Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that supports healthy bones, muscles and more, yet more than 90% of Americans don’t get enough in their diets. This is partly due to the fact that naturally occurring vitamin D is not found in high amounts in many foods, save for fish – a food which Americans certainly do not to eat enough of (see: every article ever posted on Talking Nutrition about Omega-3’s).  As a result, vitamin D intakes in the United States are largely driven by […]
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8:13 PM | So this afternoon I was trying to go to the National Association...
So this afternoon I was trying to go to the National Association of Science Writers website (that’s an org I’m a member of) and for some reason I went to sciencewriters.org instead (not their website, but wait until you see whose website it IS), and I was rewarded with THE BEST 90’s space/science GIF I’ve ever seen. What does it even mean though? UPDATE (thanks to spaceplasma): Here’s the background on that symbol. It relates to the late biologist Lynn […]
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8:05 PM | Heartland Heritage: A Pirate’s Life! In this video Aaron...
Heartland Heritage: A Pirate’s Life! In this video Aaron discusses why the wreck of the Queen Anne’s Revenge is so important for our understanding of a pirate’s life. Link: http://www.qaronline.org/ Welcome to Heartland Heritage, in this series Aaron Colgrove explores the archaeological and cultural heritage of the Mid West, the US and other parts of the world. By: Archaeosoup Productions.
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7:16 PM | Artificially Designed There are not much naturally produced...
Artificially Designed There are not much naturally produced foods. If you plant it, is not natural. Artificial selection Man made propagation GMOs By: JOLULIPA.
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7:00 PM | Transformers: 10 revolutions that made us human
Two million years ago we were just your average primate – then we started to have some revolutionary ideas and human evolution went into hyper-drive (full text available to subscribers)
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6:27 PM | The Chemistry of Pizza Whether it’s a plain cheese, a deep-dish...
The Chemistry of Pizza Whether it’s a plain cheese, a deep-dish stacked with meats or a thin-crust veggie delight, there’s just something about pizza that makes it delicious. There’s a lot of chemistry that goes into everything from dough to sauce to toppings to, of course, cheese. There’s also a very specific chemical reaction at work on every single slice, no matter what toppings you choose. It’s called the Maillard Reaction, and it’s what causes the […]
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6:00 PM | Nonchalant night-time chimp crime caught on camera
Incredible night-vision videos of daring raids on farmers' fields are the first to show chimpanzees operating under cover of darkness
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5:38 PM | Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do...
Psychologist and neuroscientist Sarah Brosnan - ScienceLives Do non-human primates like chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys respond to inequity or unfairness the way humans do? Georgia State psychologist and neuroscientist, Sarah Brosnan is interested in finding out. Brosnan studies the behavior of primates to better understand how they make decisions and cooperate with one another. By: National Science Foundation.
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5:00 PM | Thoroughly modern humans interbred with Neanderthals
The oldest genome from a modern human reveals that modern humans with modern behaviour interbred with Neanderthals as they spread into Eurasia
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4:49 PM | Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for...
Position, Velocity and Acceleration Paul Andersen explains for the position of an object over time can be used to calculate the velocity and acceleration of the object. If a net force acts on a object it will experience an acceleration. By: Bozeman Science.
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4:30 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: quantum computer buyers' guide, life on Mars might be short, brain barrier opened to treat cancer and more
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4:26 PM | Herschel observations of Comet Siding Spring initiated by an amateur astronomer
The European satellite Herschel acquired images of Comet Siding Spring before its death in 2013 — thanks to an observing proposal from an amateur astronomer!
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4:05 PM | Mars orbiter snaps close up of comet Siding Spring
NASA's spacecraft are giving astronomers a good look at a comet from the Oort cloud.
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3:50 PM | Week 22: Back on the Road and into Arizona
Astro-sculpture sighting: Urania, the Muse of Astronomy in Salt Lake City (All photos by the author). They say that you can never go home again, but sometimes, you can still visit those old stomping grounds. This past week we’ve been heading in just such a direction as we crossed the border from Utah back in [...]
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3:49 PM | Private Companies Increasingly Drive Innovation at Public Research Universities
The new Raytheon-UMass Lowell Research Institute is housed inside the Mark and Elisia Saab Emerging Technologies and Innovation Center, home to cutting-edge advances in nanotechnology, plastics engineering, optics and more. (Photo Courtesy of UMass Lowell). The amount of research dollars public colleges and universities receive from federal and state governments is dwindling. Private companies are picking up the slack, driving innovation at public research universities. Starting next semester, […]
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3:30 PM | Dark matter signal points to exotic black-hole origins
If our best sign yet of dark matter is what it seems, then the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy is a complex beast
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3:28 PM | spacetravelco: Take a close look at Andrew Degraff's remarkable...
spacetravelco: Take a close look at Andrew Degraff's remarkable space advocacy print. Seems like a good time to revisit this list of NASA spin-off technologies.
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3:19 PM | Month-long 'NANOvember' series of outreach and educational events
The month-long NANOvember celebration will showcase New York State's pioneering nanotechnology-based ecosystem with exciting events in Albany, Utica, and Rochester.
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2:57 PM | What, Me Worry? According to a recent Gallup poll, Americans are...
What, Me Worry? According to a recent Gallup poll, Americans are now believe that Ebola is a bigger problem in the U.S. than poverty/hunger, terrorism, and racism. But at least it tied with family decline! When it comes to Ebola (in the U.S., mind you, remember that this remains a serious threat in west Africa) according to our old friend science, that trusted harbinger of truth and knowledge, we have nothing to fear but fear itself.  This comes on the heels of another recent poll […]
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2:42 PM | Il pericolo di giudicare gli altri dal loro aspetto
"Anche se ci piace pensare che i nostri giudizi e le nostre scelte siano razionali, imparziali, coerenti e basati unicamente su informazioni pertinenti, la verità è che sono spesso influenzati da fattori superficiali e irrilevanti", afferma Christopher Olivola della Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business di Pittsburgh, negli Stati Uniti, commentando la sua ultima ricerca. In […]
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2:30 PM | Saving the swimming dead
This is Saltwater Science's first guest post, written by historical ecologists ...
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2:24 PM | Right of Way
WHEN THE MONTANA Department of Transportation approached the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes about widening the portion of U.S. Highway 93 that bisects the Flathead Indian Reservation, the tribes resisted. They first wanted assurances that any highway expansion would address the spirit that defines this region of prime wildlife habitat and natural wonders. The primary goal for the tribes was to mitigate the impact of the road on wildlife. While people view highways as a means of […]
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2:20 PM | Fogs of War: the Chemical Weapons Podcast
Chemical weapons have played a chilling role in human history ever since they were first used in World War I.  As reports of more recent use continue to cycle through the news, we decided to take a deeper look.  We wanted to understand why chemical weapons were created in the first place, the ethical dilemmas inherent in their use, and the complicated process of getting rid of them. The story begins in Belgium, where reporter Helena de Groot visits a farm in Flanders Fields—the […]
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2:20 PM | Fogs of War: the Chemical Weapons Podcast
Chemical weapons have played a chilling role in human history ever since they were first used in World War I.  As reports of more recent use continue to cycle through the news, we decided to take a deeper look.  We wanted to understand why chemical weapons were created in the first place, the ethical dilemmas inherent in their use, and the complicated process of getting rid of them. The story begins in Belgium, where reporter Helena de Groot visits a farm in Flanders Fields—the […]
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2:17 PM | Wildlife Photography of the Year 2014: gli scatti vincenti
Si stringono gli uni agli altri per superare il freddo della notte i babbuini gelada ritratti in questa foto premiata come “Winning Images” dal Wildlife Photography of the Year2014. A realizzarla il fotografo italiano Simone Sbaraglia, arrampicatosi su un’altura dei monti Simien, sull’altipiano etiopico, a 4500 metri di altitudine, dove questa specie di primati erbivori ha trovato rifugio. Il vincitore della 50esima edizione del contest di fotografia naturalistica […]
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