Posts

October 01, 2014

+
6:00 AM | Glutbusters: October 2014
Homegrown Garlic, Rosemary & Lemon Thyme by Susy Morris Well, that was the driest September since records began, and one of the warmest this century! Good news for the last of the summer crops; bad news for the gardener toting the watering can…. The warm weather means there’s still time to plant overwintering onions, so have a look at September’s advice on that topic. A true GlutBusters tip arrived in my inbox from Suttons this week, who recommend planting your onions […]

September 30, 2014

+
11:31 PM | Sanofi opens new Shanghai R&D headquarters
China-based hub for Asia Pacific will create 1,400 jobs
+
11:30 PM | Johnson & Johnson to acquire Alios BioPharma for $1.75bn
Will gain access to the biopharma's portfolio of viral infection candidates
+
11:30 PM | ADC Therapeutics expands team
Appointments preceed its first antibody drug conjugate trials
+
11:14 PM | Ebola case identified in Dallas
The first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States was announced September 30 in Texas.
+
10:00 PM | The best and worst countries in the world to be old in
Human lifespan is rising fast everywhere, but the Global AgeWatch Index shows that some places do better than other at making the most of their old people
+
8:47 PM | Vitamin D supports your health - but what if you're already in the hospital?
We’ve all heard about the benefits of vitamin D – ranging from bone health, to immune health, to muscle health. Recent data has even shown that vitamin D status is inversely related to mortality and there’s even data to demonstrate that for hospitalized patients, vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher odds of developing a hospital-borne infection. So what do we know about the impact of vitamin D deficiency on mortality in hospitalized patients?
+
8:37 PM | Good practice in blood clot care recognised at awards
First winners of QiC Anticoagulation programme announced
+
8:16 PM | #Hackebola The truth about contact tracing
Contact tracing is a classic public health intervention. It's no easy task even during small outbreaks - people who had physical contact with someone with an infectious disease are called or visited every day by a public health worker. If they develop symptoms, they are isolated to prevent them from spreading the disease further. When a single case of MERS-CoV was imported into the United States, over 500 people were under followup.With an outbreak as large as Ebola, the number of contacts […]
+
7:30 PM | Zoologger: Fickle female guppies fancy fresh faces
What happens at the fishy equivalent of a cocktail party with too many male guests?
+
7:16 PM | LunchBox Science Episode 21: Wine Science Yeah, you read that...
LunchBox Science Episode 21: Wine Science Yeah, you read that right. How is wine made? Uploaded by: LunchBoxScience.
+
7:00 PM | Beat temptation with the marshmallow psychologist
We need willpower to resist our desire for instant gratification, but first we need to know our enemy, says Walter Mischel (full text available to subscribers)
+
6:30 PM | How air conditioning overwhelmed its hothead haters
It was a fight between vested interests and institutional boneheadedness, but as Cool: How air conditioning changed everything explains, common sense won out
+
6:27 PM | Teleportation or Travel at the Speed of Light? When a fan asks...
Teleportation or Travel at the Speed of Light? When a fan asks whether teleportation or travel at the speed of light is more likely to happen sooner, guest host Bill Nye the Science Guy points out the practical problems with both to co-host Eugene Mirman. After a careful consideration of the physics of light speed and the incredible amount of energy required for teleportation, Bill grudgingly chooses teleportation, but Astro Mike Massimino is holding out for FTL travel so we can get someplace […]
+
6:07 PM | More LightSail Day-in-the-Life Multimedia, and a Community Image Processing Challenge
We have more multimedia from LightSail's day-in-the-life test, as well as a request for some community image processing help.
+
6:00 PM | Chimp social network shows how new ideas catch on
A study of how a chimp trick for drinking water spread throughout the social network is the first time social learning has been seen in wild chimps
+
5:58 PM | Riff raff and proud of it
Steven McKnight, president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Microbiology, has given us one of the best “I can’t believe he said that” editorials since Scott Kern.First, the average scientist today is not of the quality of our predecessors; it’s a bit analogous to the so-called “greatest generation” of men and women of the United States who fought off fascism in World War II compared with their baby boomer children. Biomedical research is a […]
+
5:38 PM | Bubbles… OF FIRE! Brian reverts to his childhood and...
Bubbles… OF FIRE! Brian reverts to his childhood and blows bubbles all episode! Oh, also his childhood is possessed with the drive to burn things. Who could’ve known? Flammable vapors trapped in bubbles is a classic of physics demonstrations, but Brian got the idea of blowing through cotton balls from the book “Stranger Than Fiction” by Derek Lever, published over 50 years ago in 1961. Uploaded by: Scam School.
+
5:30 PM | Earth gets a new companion for trip around sun
Newly discovered asteroid 2014 OL339 is the latest member of the entourage of space rocks that temporarily join Earth in its orbit around the sun
+
5:19 PM | "The government pays twice for obesity: first for the corn subsidy (to make high-fructose corn..."
“The government pays twice for obesity: first for the corn subsidy (to make high-fructose corn syrup), and then for emergency room heart attacks and health care.” - UCSF’s Robert Lustig talking about how the United States needs to shift its policy on regulating sugar content in foods.
+
5:18 PM | Blades of grass inspire advance in organic solar cells
Using a bio-mimicking analog of one of nature's most efficient light-harvesting structures, blades of grass, a research team has taken a major step in developing long-sought polymer architecture to boost power-conversion efficiency of light to electricityA breakthrough in morphology control should have widespread use in solar cells, batteries and vertical transistors.
+
5:10 PM | If matter falls down, does antimatter fall up? If you could make...
If matter falls down, does antimatter fall up? If you could make a ball out of antimatter, what would happen if you dropped it? The common physics wisdom is that matter and antimatter behave the same under gravity, so it would fall under earth’s gravity just as a ball of matter would. (That is, as long as you make sure you keep that ball away from any matter in the vicinity. Otherwise you’ll have a little uh-oh on your hands: when matter and antimatter meet they annihilate.) But […]
+
5:10 PM | World's wildlife population halved in just 40 years
Populations of vertebrate species have declined by an average of 52 per cent between 1970 and 2010, and habitat destruction by people is to blame
+
5:06 PM | Dolphins appear to perceive magnetic fields
Bottlenose dolphins take less time to start exploring a magnetized block, suggesting they can sense magnetic fields.
+
4:49 PM | Are chemicals really bad for you? Are we just living in a...
Are chemicals really bad for you? Are we just living in a chemical soup? Find out about the chemicals we encounter every day. Uploaded by: RiAus.
+
4:40 PM | Blame climate change for heatwaves that struck in 2013
An assessment of the extreme weather events concludes that five heatwaves across the world would have been unlikely without greenhouse gas emissions
+
4:30 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: what dolphins really think, being yourself online, how Hong Kong protesters network and more
+
4:16 PM | Tuesday Crusite: En garde!
There is a horror movie trope about the scientist who is far too curious for his own good, particularly where new animals are. It usually starts with something like, “Hey, little guy, what are you?” Of course, the animal turns out to be deadly and scientist’s curiosity immediately turns to terror or death.Of course, there are reasons these things are clichés. I learned this about myself last week.I had been out collecting sand crabs, and was driving back through Port […]
+
2:39 PM | Unexpected new mechanism reveals how molecules become trapped in ice
Discovery of 'stable energetic embedding' of atoms and molecules within ice has wide-ranging environmental, scientific and defense implications.
+
2:34 PM | Taking thin films to the extreme
Layering rough surfaces with nanometer-thin optical interference coatings opens new array of possible applications, such as nearly weight-free logos on the sides of spacecraft.
123456789
1,505 Results