Posts

August 21, 2014

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10:59 AM | Race to electrify rural Africa could help the West too
Investments in mini grid systems aimed at powering up remote parts of Africa may provide a test bed for rural energy infrastructure elsewhere in the world
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10:50 AM | Week 13: Crossing the Continental Divide
The Wyoming Infrared Observatory atop Mt. Jelm. All photos by the author. Ever wonder where east meets west, geographically speaking? This past week saw us hitting the road once again and crossing the great state of Wyoming, nicking Montana for a couple nights, and then entering the state of Idaho for the first time. An [...]
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7:40 AM | Week 13: Crossing the Continental Divide
The Wyoming Infrared Observatory atop Mt. Jelm. All photos by the author. Ever wonder where east meets west, geographically speaking? This past week saw us hitting the road once again and crossing the great state of Wyoming, nicking Montana for a couple nights, and then entering the state of Idaho for the first time. An [...]
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7:00 AM | It would be stupid to ignore a drop in human intellect
The long-term rise in IQ scores might be coming to a halt, but we should focus on improving social conditions rather than worrying about idiocracy
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6:14 AM | Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate in my lab!
Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate in my lab!
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4:16 AM | Tough Special Forces don’t strut their stuff
The Norwegian Armed Forces Special Operations Forces are not Rambos. They need to be team players with ample communication skills – otherwise, lives can be at
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3:28 AM | TWiM #85: Oscillation in the ocean and a Verona integron
Vincent, Elio, Michael, and Michele discuss the diel transcriptional rythmns of bacterioplankton communities in the ocean, and extensively drug resistant Pseudomonas in Ohio.
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12:00 AM | libutron: Pyrosome - colonial salp What you see in the photo is...
libutron: Pyrosome - colonial salp What you see in the photo is not a single organism, but a colony of tunicates of the genus Pyrosoma. Colonies of pyrosomes may reach a length of 60 cm and forms a distinctive rigid tube that may be colorless, pink, grayish or blue-green. One end is closed and tapered, with the opposing open end having a diaphragm.  The tube has a rough texture due to papillae on the individuals making up the colony.  Unlike salps that use pulsing of the body […]

August 20, 2014

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11:16 PM | BMS and Celgene to research cancer immunotherapy combo
Companies will study combination of nivolumab and Abraxane
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11:16 PM | MHRA launches online oral anticoagulation module
Aims to help healthcare professionals understand new blood clot treatments
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11:16 PM | Have we all gone tablet daft?
We need to think of new devices simply as an aid to selling
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11:15 PM | Allergan appoints financial head
Jim Hindman named chief financial officer
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10:30 PM | Non-fatal diseases increasingly drive assisted suicide
More people with non-fatal conditions are travelling to assisted dying clinics in Switzerland
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8:52 PM | Thousands of California Kids Don't Get Past Middle School
LOS ANGELES - Devon Sanford’s mother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer when he was in the eighth grade. After barely finishing at Los Angeles’s Henry Clay Middle School, he never enrolled in high school. Instead, he spent what should have been his freshman year caring for his mother and waiting for the police to show up asking why he wasn’t in school. No one ever came. “That was the crazy part,” he said. “Nobody called or nothing.” Although the […]
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8:15 PM | Orcas and other animals may speak with complexity
From finches to orangutans, animal vocalizations may be more complex and not as distant from the structure of human language as previously thought.
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8:13 PM | Remembering James Foley, A Journalist Who Made His Life In War Zones
American James Foley, who was executed by Islamist militants, had been working for GlobalPost when he disappeared in 2012. GlobalPost CEO Phil Balboni speaks about about Foley and his work.
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7:35 PM | Malaria parasite's invasion of blood cells tweezed apart
Tugging on malaria-causing parasite cells with laser optical tweezers suggest that the parasite cells interact only weakly with red blood cells and that the interactions could be disrupted with drugs or antibodies.
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7:30 PM | Google's fact-checking bots build vast knowledge bank
The search giant is automatically building Knowledge Vault, a massive database that could give us unprecedented access to the world's facts
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7:09 PM | Unique and Alone On the EDGE of Existence
This is a guest post by Simon C. Moore , a Biology graduate and science writer ...
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7:00 PM | Brain drain: Are we evolving stupidity?
We got smarter and smarter in the 20th century, but now there are signs that IQs have begun to fall in countries such as the UK and Australia (full text available to subscribers)
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6:37 PM | Science is “a practice, an artform still budding in its...
Science is “a practice, an artform still budding in its years.”  Another great response to my “All Call Challenge” in partnership with Call Me Ishmael, where book-lovers everywhere are calling in to share stories of a book that changed their view of the natural world. This one features Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, which I must agree is at or near the top of my you-must-definitely-read-this list for any curious reader or fan of […]
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6:18 PM | "There was a smell of Time in the air tonight. He smiled and turned the fancy in his mind. There was..."
“"There was a smell of Time in the air tonight. He smiled and turned the fancy in his mind. There was a thought. What did Time smell like? Like dust and clocks and people. And if you wondered what Time sounded like it sounded like water running in a dark cave and voices crying and dirt dropping down upon hollow box lids, and rain. And, going further, what did Time look like? Time looked like snow dropping silently into a black room or it looked like a silent film in an ancient theater, […]
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6:00 PM | Digital textbooks adapt to your level as you learn
Struggling with chapter 3? Adaptive textbooks will give you extra, personalised help when you need it
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5:31 PM | "Just six Walmart heirs have more wealth than the bottom 42 percent of Americans combined."
“Just six Walmart heirs have more wealth than the bottom 42 percent of Americans combined.” - UC Berkeley’s Robert Reich, The Rise of the Non-Working Rich.
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5:00 PM | First samples of Antarctic lake reveal thriving life
About 4000 microbe species have been found in Lake Whillans, 800 metres beneath Antarctica's ice sheets, raising hopes for life on Mars and Europa
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5:00 PM | Seals, not Spaniards, first brought TB to Americas
Seals and sea lions may have brought a form of tuberculosis to the Americas, centuries before the Spanish did so
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5:00 PM | Neanderthal demise traced in unprecedented detail
A study of 40 archaeological sites in Europe suggests the Neanderthals died out 40,000 years ago, much earlier than thought, and that humans played a role
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4:46 PM | Deacon’s Neo-Aristotelian Complication of Simple Action/Motion
Jared Diamond: We Could Be Living in a New Stone Age by 2114
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4:33 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: why we must daydream, ultimate rejuvenation trial, our place in the universe, police in Ferguson, alien heat and more
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4:30 PM | Young blood to be used in ultimate rejuvenation trial
In California, people with Alzheimer's will be given transfusions of young blood to see if improves their cognition – there's good reason to hope it might
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