Posts

December 19, 2014

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6:43 AM | 2014: A Great Year for Hupehsuchia
I just can’t get enough of those bizarre hupehsuchians! These ancient marine reptiles–known exclusively from ~248 million year old rocks in China–had a tubular, bone-encased torso, toothless jaws, and flippers often sprouting an extra finger and toe or two. In … Continue reading »The post 2014: A Great Year for Hupehsuchia appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

December 11, 2014

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3:00 PM | Assembling the Aquilops Paper
In my previous post, I introduced Aquilops, a new little dinosaur from ancient Montana, and talked about some of the science behind establishing its identity. Here, I want to step back (or is that look down?) for a little navel-gazing about … Continue reading »The post Assembling the Aquilops Paper appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

December 10, 2014

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7:00 PM | Aquilops, the little dinosaur that could
Today, several colleagues and I named a really cute little dinosaur–Aquilops americanus. At around 106 million years old, Aquilops turns out to be the oldest “horned” dinosaur (the lineage including Triceratops) named from North America, besting the previous record by nearly 20 … Continue reading »The post Aquilops, the little dinosaur that could appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

December 04, 2014

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5:47 PM | Lungfish brains ain’t boring
I tend to think of fish brains as fairly unremarkable. Too simple relative to mammal brains, too un-dinosaur-y relative to dinosaur brains. Shark and perch brains get a brief nod in many comparative anatomy classes, but mostly to lament how … Continue reading »The post Lungfish brains ain’t boring appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

November 28, 2014

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8:00 AM | Give the Gift of Paleoart!
One of my favorite things about the Internet Age, among many favorite things, is the way in which it facilitates access to some incredible paleontology-themed art. The talented artists who illustrated the dinosaurs of my childhood reached their audiences through … Continue reading »The post Give the Gift of Paleoart! appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

November 25, 2014

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5:41 PM | Can penguins tell us how far the Cretaceous diving bird Hesperornis wandered?
Don’t mess with Hesperornis. It was a flightless, aquatic Cretaceous bird that measured up to six feet long, had a beak lined with sharp teeth, and was partially responsible for the downfall of at least one scientific career*. It superficially resembled … Continue reading »The post Can penguins tell us how far the Cretaceous diving bird Hesperornis wandered? appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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