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Posts

April 23, 2014

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7:15 PM | Google reinforces geopolitical bubbles
Brian Ries, writing at Mashable: Russian users of Google Maps, who use the service through Google.ru, will see that Crimea is wholly a territory of Mother Russia. That black line is a border — the same style that marks all 1,426.07 miles from the Black Sea in the south to Belarus in the north. Americans […]∞
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7:08 PM | An Algorithm That Recognizes Faces Better Than People Can
Faces from the Dataset Used to Test the Algorithm Described Below Labeled Faces in the Wild, University of Massachusetts It's already a little eerie when Facebook suggests tags for who it recognizes in your photo, especially for faces that are small, blurry, or otherwise difficult to distinguish. What if Facebook were even better--better at recognizing people in pictures than you are? Two computer scientists are announcing they've made a program that is better at matching photos than […]
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7:00 PM | Mars Diffracts! X-ray Crystallography and Space Exploration An...
Mars Diffracts! X-ray Crystallography and Space Exploration An epic journey into the role of X-ray diffraction in space! Astrobiologist and intrepid science communicator Lewis Dartnell reveals the crucial role that x-ray crystallography is playing in understanding the formation and history of our planetary neighbour, Mars. Explaining the techniques used by the Curiosity Rover to analyse the Martian surface, Lewis reveals what the discovery of clay might mean for the possibility of life on the […]
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7:00 PM | Giant solar farm uses molten salt to keep power coming
Renewable energy could help underpin the grid now that the world's biggest concentrated solar storage plant is up and running in Arizona
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6:55 PM | Talking Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
Earlier this week I sat down with my friend Cara Santa Maria to chat on her excellent podcast, Talk Nerdy. The conversation was wide-ranging: we talked about the discovery of a new group of insects... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:55 PM | Talking Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
Earlier this week I sat down with my friend Cara Santa Maria to chat on her excellent podcast, Talk Nerdy. The conversation was wide-ranging: we talked about the discovery of a new group of insects... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:54 PM | Don't Bogart that joint: Casual marijuana use linked to brain changes?
"Using marijuana a few times a week is enough to physically alter critical brain structures," wrote Karen Weintraub wrote on April 15 in USA TODAY. That might be true. Then again, maybe not. The problem is that Weintraub doesn't know whether it's true, and neither do the authors of the study on which her story was based. Sadly, the lead author of the study, which appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience, thinks he knows. Hans Breiter of […]
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6:52 PM | Copper nanowires could become basis for new solar cells
By looking at a piece of material in cross section, researchersdiscovered how copper sprouts grass-like nanowires that could one day be made into solar cells.
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6:47 PM | NAD: A Renaissance Molecule and its Role in Cell Health
NAD is a pyridine nucleotide. It provides the oxidation and reduction power for generation of ATP by mitochondria. For many years it was believed that the primary function of NAD/NADH in cells was to harness and transfer energy  from glucose, fatty and amino acids through pathways like glycolysis, beta-oxidation and the citric acid cycle. Today, […]
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6:43 PM | Superconducting qubit array points the way to quantum computers
A fully functional quantum computer is one of the holy grails of physics. A group of physicists has moved one step closer to making a quantum computer a reality.
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6:41 PM | What Evil Drove The Car?
Last year, I had the privilege of visiting the North Hollywood shop of custom car builder George Barris. Barris created the ‘60’s Batmobile, the Munsters coach, the jalopy from the Beverly Hillbillies, and many other legendary vehicles. He also was very proud of the black Lincoln Continental he created for The Car.For many years, The Car was a long forgotten horror film from the ‘70’s that was roasted by the critics, and it quickly came and went in the theaters. But many […]
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6:37 PM | Atomic switcheroo explains origins of thin-film solar cell mystery
Treating cadmium-telluride solar cell materials with cadmium-chloride improves their efficiency, but researchers have not fully understood why. Now, an atomic-scale examination of the thin-film solar cells has answered this decades-long debate about the materials' photovoltaic efficiency increase after treatment.
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6:32 PM | Nontraditional Animal Models—The Ground Squirrel
We still talk about guinea pigs as experimental subjects yet you'd have a hard time finding one in a modern research laboratory. Guinea pigs were first used in biomedical research in the late 19th century, playing a major role in establishing the germ theory, identifying pathogens, linking vitamin C insufficiency to scurvy, and modeling diabetes and pre-eclampsia. The guinea pig metaphor lives on but today, mice, rats, fruit flies, nematodes, and zebrafish dominate as model animals. But there […]
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6:31 PM | Clone-O-Matic
I imagine it won’t come as a surprise to most of you when I reveal I am a fan of science fiction. I love the future in all its forms, dystopian, utopian, post-apocalyptic . . . and the future got a little … Continue reading →
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6:30 PM | Differences between genres of social injustice perceived in the workplace
When an unfair situation lives some decide to shut up and put up, while others seek revenge but there are differences according to gender?
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6:30 PM | Bill Nye on Humanity’s Biggest Engineering Challenge When...
Bill Nye on Humanity’s Biggest Engineering Challenge When a fan asks what is the most revolutionary engineering challenge humanity will face in the coming decades, former engineer Bill Nye the Science Guy doesn’t hesitate to tell co-host Eugene Mirman that it’s climate change. But NASA astronaut Mike Massimino suggests a few other issues that engineers will need to solve as well. via Star Talk Radio.
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6:27 PM | Biofuels From Crop Residue May Increase Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Using corn crop residue to make ethanol and other biofuels reduces soil carbon and can generate more greenhouse gases than gasoline, according to a study published in the journal Nature Climate Change (see footnote). Read more »

Liska, A., Yang, H., Milner, M., Goddard, S., Blanco-Canqui, H., Pelton, M., Fang, X., Zhu, H. & Suyker, A. (2014). Biofuels from crop residue can reduce soil carbon and increase CO2 emissions, Nature Climate Change, DOI:

Citation
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6:24 PM | Distribution of a range
Suppose you’re drawing random samples uniformly from some interval. How likely are you to see a new value outside the range of values you’ve already seen? The problem is more interesting when the interval is unknown. You may be trying…Read more ›
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6:21 PM | Students Learn from Faculty, Alumni about Energy Efficiency Careers
The Earth Institute is expanding its professional development program with the addition of mini-career workshops that focus on particular areas of sustainability. The first of these workshops took place on April 17, 2014, and it focused on energy efficiency. The purpose of the workshops is to provide opportunities to students to learn from faculty and alumni, who are practitioners in various sustainability fields. Offering these workshops was one of the recommendations of the Professional […]
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6:15 PM | ucresearch: One of our Favorites: Anatomy Professor Marian...
ucresearch: One of our Favorites: Anatomy Professor Marian Diamond. She is one of the world’s renowned experts in neuroanatomy (and even did research on Einstein’s brain).  She’s also a bit of a YouTube star — you can watch her popular course on general human anatomy.
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6:15 PM | Blood of world's oldest woman hints at limits of life
She lived to 115, but a study of Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper's blood hints at factors limiting lifespan
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6:10 PM | Mystery of “bio-duck” sounds from deep ocean solved
Scientists believe they have finally discovered the cause of the mysterious Donald Duck-type sounds that have regularly been recorded in the deep ocean since the 1960s. Descrier - news and culture magazine
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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6:09 PM | Cancer: what’s Down syndrome got to do with it?
Trisomy 21 (having 3 copies of chromosome 21) is most well known as the cause of Down syndrome. But as you can imagine, having an entire extra copy of a chromosome has other negative consequences as well. For one, people with Down syndrome are 20 times more  likely than the average person to develop a severe form of leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Two recent studies have helped further our understanding of the molecular disturbances that take place in […]
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