Posts

October 24, 2014

+
1:05 PM | First Ebola Case Hits New York
A doctor who recently returned to New York from treating Ebola patients in Guinea tests positive for the deadly virus.
+
1:03 PM | For a 7-Minute Workout, Download Our New App
The New York Times is offering a free mobile app for the popular Scientific 7-minute Workout and the new Advanced 7-minute Workout.
+
1:00 PM | What we’re reading: The color of cichlids, projected genomes, and simplifying NSF proposals
In the journals Albertson RC, KE Powder, Y Hu, KP Coyle, RB Roberts, and KJ Parsons. 2014. Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes. Molecular Ecology, 23: 5135–5150. doi: 10.1111/mec.12900. … … Continue reading →
+
1:00 PM | How An Antibiotic Gene Jumped All Over The Tree of Life
Every living thing on the planet has to contend with bacteria. To many viruses, they are prey. To …
+
1:00 PM | Your life on earth
Your life on earth: How you and the world have changed since you were born Put your life into...
+
1:00 PM | Your life on earth
Your life on earth: How you and the world have changed since you were born Put your life into...
+
12:56 PM | Protein folding probably requires the assistance of Frigg
The Discovery Institute doesn’t understand the protein folding problem. I mean that literally: they don’t understand the problem. Scientists don’t know the answer, but they have a clear understanding of the problem. PNAS published a “Perspective” article, “The Nature of Protein Folding Pathways,” by S. Walter Englander and Leland Mayne. Unsurprisingly, they try to approach…
+
12:50 PM | Roundabout RNA: How Circular RNAs Form
Penn scientists are at the forefront of exploring and pushing back the boundaries of the bewilderingly complex world of RNA.And, Jeremy Wilusz, PhD, a new faculty member in the department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, is adding to that knowledge with a recently published paper in Genes & Development on circular RNAs.
+
12:49 PM | #Brain article of interest: If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory
From Neuroscience News -- ScienceDailyRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/12pKhQg
+
12:41 PM | Can we make room temperature superconductors?
What do high speed levitating trains, MRI machines and particle accelerators have in common? They all use superconductors. Superconductors are materials that can carry electrical current for long distances without losing energy, and can even produce their own magnetic fields.Why are superconductors important?These materials have a vast and diverse range of uses, mainly because they allow for the production of extremely efficient wires. The relationship between electric current in wires and […]
+
12:10 PM | Mali's First Ebola Case In Current Outbreak Is 2-Year-Old Girl
The toddler was reportedly brought by her grandmother from neighboring Guinea, where the epidemic is raging.
+
12:04 PM | The Diablog on Replication with Dan Simons
Dan SimonsLast year, I had a very informative and enjoyable blog dialogue, or diablog, with Dan Simons about the reliability and validity of replication attempts. Unfortunately, there was never an easy way for anyone to access this diablog. It has only occurred to me today (!) that I could remedy this situation by creating a meta-post. Here it is.In my first post on the topic, I argued that it is important to consider to consider not only the reliability but also the validity of replication […]
+
12:00 PM | Recommended reads #38
Ecologist Timothée Poisot has what I think is a remarkable insight about the myth/cult/phenomenon of busy in academia. This is one of those topics that causes people to people spill lots of neurons and ink, often recycling a lot of the same notions. But this one is different and worth your time. Anthropologist Holly Dunsworth recently…
+
12:00 PM | Trick or Treat or Barf: Researchers Use Social Media to Raise Awareness of Norovirus Season
NC State researchers are trying to raise awareness of norovirus safety through a novel (and cute) social media campaign.
+
12:00 PM | Your Friday Dose of Woo: Just what acupuncture needs. Holograms. And more quantum.
It’s been a bit of a depressing week. I suppose it’s not any more depressing than usual, with the usual unending stream of pseudoscience, quackery (particularly of the Ebola type), and, of course, antivaccine nonsense to deal with. Then, as I’m writing yet another in a long line of unfunded grants, I find out that…
+
11:58 AM | Early- and late-onset complications of the ketogenic diet for intractable epilepsy
The following is an abstract of a publication dealing with the side-effects of the ketogenic diet. The reference to the article is: Kang HC, Chung DE, Kim DW, Kim HD.Early- […]
+
11:56 AM | Coming ever closer – first PARP inhibitor on track to be licensed in Europe
Olaparib is the first PARP inhibitor to move closer to licensing in Europe. What is it, how does it work, and when will it be available in the UK?
+
11:55 AM | Ebola virus arrives in New York City
This morning I received this email from President Lee Bollinger: Dear fellow members of the Columbia community: As you may have seen in the media, Dr. Craig Spencer is being treated for Ebola at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan. Dr. Spencer, an emergency department physician at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, recently returned from a humanitarian mission […]
+
11:43 AM | The Combination Lock Test
Brendan Fitzgerald in The Morning News: A man dies, leaving behind, among other things, a combination lock. Opening it may just prove the existence of the afterlife. I first learned about Stevenson through his obituary, which ran in the New...
+
11:28 AM | Making Organizations Moral
Sophia Nguyen in Harvard Magazine: In the early 2000s, a riptide of business scandals toppled Enron, Arthur Andersen, and WorldCom. In the aftermath, says Straus professor of business administration Max Bazerman, “society turned to professional schools” to ask why their...
+
11:22 AM | Friday Cephalopod: Alien beauty
No summary available for this post.
+
11:21 AM | Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent
In a significant breakthrough, scientists have succeeded in creating a large metamateria that is essentially isotropic, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator.
+
11:21 AM | Hubble spots Comet Siding Spring flying past Mars
Comet Siding Spring makes near miss of Mars in this image form the Hubble Space Telescope. Click to enlarge! Image Credit: NASA, ESA, PSI, JHU/APL, STScI/AURA Last Sunday the comet C/2013 A1  Siding Spring flew past Mars at a distance of just 140 thousand kilometers, or one third of the distance between the Earth and the Moon. It's the closest we've ever seen a comet get to a rocky planet- so close, in fact, that initial observations suggested it might even hit.Data and observations […]
+
11:14 AM | Liquid helium offers a fascinating new way to make charged molecules
Scientists developed a completely new way of forming charged molecules which offers tremendous potential for new areas of chemical research.
+
11:10 AM | the death of fraternity
Chris Lehman at The Baffler: Whether we like it or not, the big idea behind American democracy is to make us like each other more. It’s a faintly embarrassing dimension of our social experiment, carved out of the crack-up of...
+
11:08 AM | Bears, okapis, crows and Wren - blogs roundup
Blogs on our network this week included a tribute to famed puzzler and mathematician Martin Gardner, a primer on quantum tunneling, and a look at the super world of super-resolution microscopyWelcome to Signal Boost, our weekly roundup of blog posts on the science network over the past week.Who owns the moon? Clue: Its probably not Gru. Saskia Vermeylen looks at some of the complex legalities involved in galactic geopolitics. Continue reading...
+
11:06 AM | Judith Butler's Eqbal Ahmad Lecture at Hamshire College
No summary available for this post.
+
11:06 AM | Should the creation of novel viruses be banned? podcast
Do the benefits of creating enhanced viruses to study transmissibility and virulence outweigh the risks? Virologist Wendy Barclay and epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch debate this controversial question Continue reading...
+
11:06 AM | bartleby at the office
Nikil Saval at Dissent: Few institutions have offered themselves as less promising for the novelist than the modern office. Work of any kind is a tricky subject for representation; office work—gray, gnomic, and unknowable—even more so. After all, what is...
+
11:03 AM | A Wisecracking Biochemist Shares Her Kitchen ABCs
Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage's red hue while it's in the pan.
123456789
10,992 Results