Posts

March 30, 2015

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9:34 PM | California's Death Row, The Nation's Largest, Runs Out Of Room
The death-row population in the state is growing because no one has been put to death in nearly a decade. Gov. Jerry Brown is asking for more money to open 100 more cells.
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9:29 PM | Airstrikes In Yemen Intensify, Hit Refugee Camp
Airstrikes intensified as Houthi rebels advanced on the port city of Aden. Aid agencies say one airstrike killed dozens at a refugee camp, while Yemeni officials blamed rebel shelling.
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9:06 PM | Fish Oil Claims Not Supported by Research
The vast majority of clinical trials have found no evidence that fish oil supplements lower the risk of heart attack and stroke.
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9:02 PM | Want to keep supermarket customers? Don’t sell moldy food
As traditional grocery stores continue to lose market share and wonks advise adding bars and a fishmonger, the New South Wales Food Authority (that’s in Australia) has a better tip: don’t sell out-of-date and moldy food. Several Coles, Woolworths and … Continue reading →
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9:00 PM | Opossum Peptides Are A Promising New Antivenom
Though some may consider them a nuisance, opossums are amazingly hardy and opportunistic eaters, feeding on everything from the contents of a garbage can to fruits or…
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8:55 PM | Invertebrate of the Week #16 – Peltodoris atromaculata
This week we are highlighting the distinctive nudibranch Peltodoris atromaculata.  A southern European species, this spotted Discodorid sea slug can be found throughout the Mediterranean and select locations off the western coast […]
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8:54 PM | 3D-Printed Violin Looks Like the Future of Music
The same, but different.
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8:51 PM | Confirmation Bias: Why The Moon Gets Blamed For A Lot
In ancient times, attributing effects to the moon made some sense. If it could change tides, which everyone except Galileo recognized it did, why not cause effects in people? read more
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8:50 PM | Watch This CD Rip Apart –  At 170,000 FPS
The Slow Mo Guys filmed a CD spinning up to 23,000 rpm at a genuinely incredible 170,000 frames per second. It's the highest frame rate they've ever employed on the channel, and it's pretty spectacular to watch. (For reference, the footage up top was shot at "only" 28,500 FPS.)Read more...
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8:49 PM | 254A, Notes 8: The Hardy-Littlewood circle method and Vinogradov’s theorem
We have seen in previous notes that the operation of forming a Dirichlet series or twisted Dirichlet series is an incredibly useful tool for questions in multiplicative number theory. Such series can be viewed as a multiplicative Fourier transform, since the functions and are multiplicative characters. Similarly, it turns out that the operation of forming […]
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8:49 PM | Climate Change vs. Conservation
Has global warming made it harder for environmentalists to care about conservation? Source: www.newyorker.com GR:  Pretty good argument that there is no hope for preserving nature on Earth so we should get over it and do the few small temporary … Continue reading →
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8:49 PM | Fake happy memories created while you sleep
Memory manipulation is the stuff of science fiction and urban myths. At least it was until a series of experiments on mice have shown it is possible. Last year I wrote about a study in which scientists used light to create and delete false memories of fear in mice. A different group used the same […]
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8:46 PM | Why Are Chinese Artists Representing Kenya At The Venice Biennale?
Kenya will participate in the Venice Biennale, the prestigious art show that opens on May 9. But only two of the artists representing Kenya will be Kenyan. Most aren't even African — they're Chinese.
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8:43 PM | Natural Selection Drives Evolution of Bird Colors, Say Scientists
In a worldwide study of the evolution of bird plumage coloration, a team of scientists led by Prof Peter Dunn of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee found that while male birds often have brighter feathers than females, the two sexes have come closer together in color over time to blend into their surroundings and hide from [...]
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8:40 PM | Tiny 'Nanoneedles' Could Help Your Damaged Organs Repair Themselves
In a trial involving mice, an international team of researchers used microscopic "nanoneedles" to coax the body into generating new blood vessels. Applied to humans, the technology could eventually be used to get organs and nerves to repair themselves.Read more...
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8:38 PM | Campylobacter testing in NZ
The New Zealand Ministry of Primary Industries said since performance targets for Campylobacter were introduced in 2008, setting contamination limits for poultry processors, the number of notified cases of people infected with campylobacter had halved. There had also been a … Continue reading →
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8:31 PM | Fasting and less-toxic cancer drug may work as well as chemotherapy
Fasting in combination with chemotherapy has already been shown to kill cancer cells, but a pair of new studies in mice suggests that a less-toxic class of drugs combined with fasting may kill breast, colorectal and lung cancer cells equally well. If shown to work in humans, this combination could replace chemotherapy and make fasting a potent component of a long-term strategy to treat cancer, according to senior author Valter Longo of USC. Subject:  Health & […]
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8:30 PM | It must be spring - tell tale signs
After a long, cold winter, the human spirit just loves signs of spring, those little tell tales that let you know the season is changing.  Here's a mess of crocus that occupy space around and under some hydrangeas the still need pruning.  These crocus are basically volunteers that have prospered in some borrowed space, and they are so cheerful. They used to be in the lawn, but then that area was converted into  garden (grass to garden good, garden to grass never), and they were […]
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8:24 PM | In the Agulhas
On board with Lindblad Expeditions Southern Africa and Indian Ocean tour. March 27, 2015 – The Agulhas current flows down the east coast of Africa from the north. It’s described as “narrow, swift, and strong” on our briefing material aboard National Geographic Orion. As it reaches the southern tip of Africa at Cape Agulhas (Cape of…
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8:24 PM | Media's Response To The IPCC Examined
The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a group of climate change experts representatively selected from regions around the world that periodically releases Assessment Reports in order to inform policymakers and the public about the latest evidence for climate change. The publication of each report is a key event in the debate about climate change, but their reception and coverage in the media has varied widely. A new paper has for the first time analyzed how Twitter, TV and […]
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8:24 PM | Greenhouse Gases Unbalanced
Natural wetlands usually emit methane and sequester carbon dioxide. Anthropogenic interventions, in particular the conversion of wetlands for agriculture, result in a significant increase in CO2 emissions, which overcompensate potential decreases in methane emission. A large international research team now calculated that the conversion of arctic and boreal wetlands into agricultural land would result in an additional cumulative radiative forcing of about 0,1 MilliJoule (mJ) per square meter […]
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8:23 PM | San Juan-Chama forecast: looks like a second year of shortfall
According to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, warm February weather meant the earliest runoff in the 40-plus year history of the San Juan-Chama Project, which brings water from southern Colorado to the Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico. But “early” does not translate to “a lot of water”. San Juan-Chama Project contractors, the largest of ...Continue reading ‘San Juan-Chama forecast: looks like a second year of shortfall’ »
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8:20 PM | Do You Suffer From 'Exploding Head Syndrome'? You're Not Alone.
New findings indicate nearly one in five college-age students has been startled awake by an abrupt, loud noise that doesn't actually exist. Known as "exploding head syndrome," the psychological condition appears to be more common and disruptive than previously thought.Read more...
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8:20 PM | Sharks Can Bark Like Dogs
Sometimes nature is just out to screw with you. There are at least two kinds of shark that can, when handled, bark like dogs. Anyone who wonders if their bark is worse than their bite is welcome to try to find out.Read more...
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8:17 PM | Tuning Out and Tuning In
It had been way too long since I’d taken the kids camping.  Earlier this month, however, I managed to get two out of three of them to come with me and we had a great overnight trip to our family … Continue reading →
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8:15 PM | Texas Town Going All in on Solar and Wind
Georgetown, Texas, population 48,000, will soon become the largest U.S. city to use only renewable energy. Continue reading →
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8:12 PM | Where Can Civic Ecology Lead? TNOC Podcast Episode 003
Also available at iTunes. Story notes: Climate change and other stresses on cities represent great challenges to societies. Some of these challenges are systematic and somehow “knowable”—that is, we know generally what to expect, even if we aren’t sure how to respond. Other threats and stresses are unexpected, even random in the appearance. Things happen that … Continue reading Where Can Civic Ecology Lead? TNOC Podcast Episode 003 →
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8:10 PM | Porpoises Turn Sound Beams into 'Flashlights' to Hunt
The animals can fine-tune the scope of their echolocation calls to broaden or narrow their search for prey.
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8:03 PM | Sparse Spikes Deconvolution on Thin Grids / Compressive Sensing in Electromagnetics - A Review
Jong Chul Ye let me now that a second version of Improving M-SBL for Joint Sparse Recovery using a Subspace Penalty is out. It is here: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.06679v2.pdf Gabriel Peyré let me know of the following: Hi Igor,A paper that might interest the CS community http://gpeyre.github.io/2015/03/24/thin-grids/The numerical section contains some findings on support (in)stability of CS with l^1.-- best From his blog post:Vincent Duval and myself just released a new paper on the […]
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8:00 PM | Orphan Returning Home #ExpBio
The kidneys provide half of our acid-base balance in the body, with the rest being performed by our lungs. Our pulmonary system regulates the intake and output of carbon dioxide, while the kidneys excrete acid and retain or generate bicarbonate, the primary buffer in the fluids outside of our cells. It’s amazing how much of […]
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