Posts

July 29, 2014

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11:37 AM | Poll: how do you calculate sums of squares in an unbalanced ANOVA?
Inspired by, and related to, Meg’s recent poll on how you interpret interaction terms and main effects in ANOVA, I thought I’d ask my own ANOVA-related questions: Part of the reason I’m asking these two questions is that different stats … Continue reading →
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11:04 AM | Adam ruins purebred dogs
From US comedian Adam Conover.  An easy target - but nonetheless funny.
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11:00 AM | One Way To Highlight Diversity in STEM Fields
The fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (known collectively as STEM) have a diversity problem. In 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that women, African Americans and Hispanics are significantly under-represented in STEM fields. For example, in 2011, 11 percent of the U.S. workforce was African American, while 6 percent of STEM workers were African American. And while Hispanics made up 15 percent of the workforce, they made up only 7 percent of STEM workers. Women made […]
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10:55 AM | Colourfully cunning cryptoflorigraphic conundrum
Stephen Bax has now claimed to have begun to decipher the Voynich manuscript and suggests it is probably a treatise on nature.
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10:15 AM | NASA limits foreign contributions to U.S. planetary missions
Proposed rule would prevent U.S.-led Discovery missions from being dominated by foreign instruments
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10:10 AM | Panel sees ASTEROIDS Act as step in right direction for space property rights
A bill introduced in the House earlier this month that establishes property rights for resources taken from asteroids is not perfect, but a step in the right direction towards a broader resolution of property rights in outer space, a conference panel argued last week. The American Space Technology for Exploring Resource Opportunities in Deep Space [...]
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9:45 AM | Hurry up and start fixing the Gulf, U.S. senators say
Restoration council says it will begin accepting proposals next month to help ecosystems recover from 2010 oil spill
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7:53 AM | Stem Cell Discovery May Increase Efficiency of Tissue Regeneration
Miguel Ramalho-Santos, PhDA new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell.The research builds on a strategy that involves reprogramming adult cells back to an embryonic state in which they again have the potential to become any type of cell.The efficiency […]
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6:22 AM | Wild Australia: can the world’s oldest plant be saved?
BLINDFOLDED and disoriented, all sense of direction is lost as our helicopter corkscrews into the sky on the windswept extremity of Tasmania’s World Heritage-listed South West Wilderness area.Mary Williams's insight:Fascinating - 43,000 year old triploid angiosperms, Lomatia tasmanica. Scientists are trying to propagate it by tissue culture with limited successSee it on Scoop.it, via Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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6:11 AM | Comparative Phylogenomics Uncovers the Impact of Symbiotic Associations on Host Genome Evolution
AbstractMutualistic symbioses between eukaryotes and beneficial microorganisms of their microbiome play an essential role in nutrition, protection against disease, and development of the host. However, the impact of beneficial symbionts on the evolution of host genomes remains poorly characterized. Here we used the independent loss of the most widespread plant–microbe symbiosis, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM), as a model to address this question. Using a large phenotypic approach and […]
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6:00 AM | A review of the effects of soil organisms on plant hormone signalling pathways
Plants interact with a large number of soil organisms. For a long time, these interactions have been the research area of soil ecologists and trophic relationships and physico-chemical modifications of the soil matrix were generally proposed as mechanisms underlying plant-soil organism interactions. However, some specific symbioses and diseases have been well characterized at the molecular level by plant biologists and microbiologists. These interactions involve a physical contact between soil […]
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5:57 AM | Assistant Professor Position in Plant-Microbe Interactions at UW Madison
The Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is searching broadly at the assistant professor level for a researcher who studies the ecology or epidemiology of plant-associated microbes through the use of emerging and novel quantitative methods. Areas of focus could include, but are not limited to: role of plant pathogens in the ecology of agricultural or natural systems; ecology of plant-associated microbes; population genetics of plant pathogens; metapopulation and […]
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2:00 AM | Another fluoridation whopper from Declan Waugh
Declan Waugh is a self-proclaimed “scientist and fluoride researcher” who seems to spend all his time misrepresenting and distorting  scientific literature and health data to promote his anti-fluoride cause. Waugh has an avid following, among fellow anti-fluoride activists and propagandists. The … Continue reading →
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1:16 AM | Making Your Science Matter
This guest post is by Chris Creese, a member of the “Ec […]
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1:09 AM | NEW VIDEO! It’s time for… Summertime Science!! This week I...
NEW VIDEO! It’s time for… Summertime Science!! This week I ventured out into the scorching heat of Austin in July to look at why we sweat, why we get sunburned, and why our fingers get all wrinkled when we go swimming. I had to go swimming and get a watermelon sno-cone for this video… the sacrifices I make for my videos, eh? I would also like to note that the thumbnail is in no way photoshopped. An earlier version of this video had an error in it, so I re-uploaded it. That […]
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12:15 AM | How Mature is Your Cyber Security Model?
In the previous articles, we’ve been discussing cyber security throughout different angles and perspectives, but we’ve never talked about its maturity model and how it’s important in the modern world. First of all, we should define what the term cyber […]test The post How Mature is Your Cyber Security Model? appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:00 AM | asapscience: “A large school of mobula rays fades into the...
asapscience: “A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray […]

July 28, 2014

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11:55 PM | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder & Eating Disorders: Is There a Link?
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, is a common childhood disorder. ADHD can often persist into adolescence and adulthood. The prevalence of ADHD is thought to be between 6-7% among children and adolescents and ~5% among adults (Willcutt, 2012). Increasingly, evidence from multiple studies has pointed to comorbidity between ADHD and eating disorders (EDs). For example, one study found that young females with ADHD were […]
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11:55 PM | WHOOPS
I messed up something in this week’s video about Summertime Science and you guys only deserve the best and most accurate science information, so I’m going to fix it and reupload it later.  That means if you’ve already watched it, you can watch it twice!
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11:07 PM | Could our furry friends’ features be the result of stem cell defects?
In the 1950s, Russian fox fur breeder Dmitri Belyaev embarked on a monumental experiment in the Siberian city of Novosibirsk. He wanted to see if he could domesticate wild foxes by selectively breeding only the tamest in each generation. He was essentially trying to re-run thousands of years of history — dogs and many of […]
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11:01 PM | All 8 Pangolin Species Being Eaten into Extinction
A few days ago customs officials in Vietnam raided a cargo ship from Sierra Leone and seized an astonishing 1.4 tons of dried pangolin scales. The grisly discovery came from the bodies of as many as... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:53 PM | New Zealand’s Southern Alps have lost a third of their ice
This article by Jim Salinger, University of Auckland; Blair Fitzharris, University of Otago, and Trevor Chinn, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, was first published at The Conversation. The photo at left shows the calving face of the Tasman Glacier in Dec 2013. A third of the permanent snow and ice of New Zealand’s […]
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10:38 PM | Are Women Animals?
I am slowly writing a post on animal pain or how we view pain in animals, not really sure yet. During my research I came across this lecture (audio / 40 min / 19 MB). by Joanna Bourke; I found the parallels in our historical attitudes toward animals and the “other”  (i.e. gender, race, economic classes)…
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10:34 PM | Spiny media battle highlights importance of scientific credit
It’s not about lionfish or science fair projects, but about who came up with the big idea ScicuriousScience & Society by Bethany Brookshire 7:25pm, July 28, 2014 Lionfish may be spiny, but a recent battle over credit on research about them got still more pointed.Magnus Kjaergaard/Wikimedia CommonsWhen we decided recently to give Scicurious a new tagline — […]
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10:30 PM | Could this technology put an end to battles over genetically engineered foods?
In a post alerting us to some very important developments in genetically engineered foods, Tabitha M. Powledge at On Science Blogs wonders whether a technology called CRISPR could ease the concerns of anti-GMO activists. Powledge takes note of the sequencing of the genome of bread wheat, which turned out to be far more complicated than we might expect--"more-than-usually incestuous" is how she puts it. And she gives us a short and useful explication of CRISPR, which some are calling a natural […]
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10:30 PM | Science writers call out brain science blooper in new Scarlett Johansson film
***Spoiler Alert*** Movies that incorporate science can provide journalists with great teachable moments. It’s fun and educational to discuss what movie makers get right and what they get wrong. And why not take advantage of these intersections between science and pop culture to delve into the plausibility of traveling back in time, building antimatter super-bombs, reanimating frozen people, endowing apes with speech or erasing memories of bad relationships. Cognitive enhancement is a […]
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10:30 PM | Guest post by Tara Haelle: If a 12-year-old's "breakthrough" sounds too good to be true...
[Editor's note: Tara Haelle is a freelance science writer whose specialties include medicine, vaccines and public health. Her work has appeared in Scientific American and Slate. She blogs at Red Wine & Apple Sauce and is working on a book about science-based parenting with Emily Willingham.] It’s a favorite media trope – whiz kid makes amazing scientific discovery. So it was no surprise that the story of 12-year-old Lauren Arrington went viral. For her sixth-grade science […]
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10:30 PM | Psst, Nieman Journalism Lab: Explanatory journalism isn't "the new craze of the past year."
It's not just a new craze, people, it's a movement! It's Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight, and Vox, and The Upshot at The New York Times, and now--a new entrant--Storyline at The Washington Post. "Explanatory journalism," writes media analyst Ken Doctor at Nieman Journalism Lab, is "the new craze of the past year, built on ideas as old as good journalism itself. Or call it the wonk wars...How do we explain this movement?" Doctor's post--mostly an interview with David Leonhardt, who runs The […]
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10:00 PM | The Moon Could Be Littered With Fossils From Earth
Diatoms. Images a and b are raw diatoms; c and d are fossilized, and e and f are fossilized diatoms that were frozen but not shot. Mark Burchell et al., Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Since 1996, scientists have debated about whether the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence that life once existed on Mars. The rock holds some microscopic wormy-looking structures that some scientists have suggested could be fossilized remains of life on Mars, whereas others say the […]
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10:00 PM | The Art of Urban Botany
A few links have come in through the feeds today on urban botany. It could be interesting if you can’t get away for a holiday. Urban Botany, Urban Art and the Instagram Effect by Hollis Marriot at In the Company of Plants and Rocks blogs a botanical tour around Laramie. The juxtaposition of natural and […]
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