Posts

September 15, 2014

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7:04 PM | Is the problem an internet echo or Feierman’s ethics?
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid. It is found in cold water fatty fish… On 9/19/13, I posted here and to the evolutionary psychology yahoo group  (msg #152240) on the link between Aquatic Ape Theory, dietary DHA, my...Read more
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7:04 PM | How Temperature Affects People With Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder that presents with myriad of symptoms. The disease causes physical as well as emotional changes in the patients. One peculiar symptom seen in people with MS is their sensitivity to heat. While heat sensitivity…The post How Temperature Affects People With Multiple Sclerosis appeared first on Just Science.
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7:00 PM | Early Earth - Now A Lot Less Like Hell
The 500 million years after Earth formed were not the hot, lava-filled Hell commonly portrayed, it may have had oceans, continents and active crustal plates - a lot like we have today. This alternate view of Earth's first geologic eon, called the Hadean, gets support from the first detailed comparison of zircon crystals that formed more than 4 billion years ago with those formed contemporaneously in Iceland, which has been proposed as a possible geological analog for early Earth.read more
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7:00 PM | 5 Educational Programs For Learning By Making
Students participate in hands-on learning at The Makery in New York City. Courtesy Makery NYC SparkTruck Frustrated with the decline of hands-on learning, Stanford University students created SparkTruck as a roving maker lab. They outfitted a Utilimaster van with tools like a laser cutter and hundreds of dollars worth of Popsicle sticks and miniature motors, then drove it across the country—twice—stopping at schools. It’s reached about 5,000 kids, plus […]
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7:00 PM | Ancient Mexican Tequila Worked as Food, Energy Drink
The earliest alcoholic beverage in Mesoamerica is still drunk today.
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7:00 PM | The go-between: Life's unexpected messenger
Far from staying put, RNA – the less famous cousin of DNA – can roam far afield, carrying information to other cells in the body and even to other animals (full text available to subscribers)
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7:00 PM | Human 'language gene' makes mice smarter
Putting the human FOXP2 gene – thought to play a role in the development of language – into mice makes them quicker at learning tasks automatically
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6:54 PM | Book Review: Island on Fire
Island on Fire: The extraordinary story of Laki, the volcano that turned eighteenth-century Europe dark By Witze, A. & Kanipe, J. PROFILE-BOOKS 224 pages | Hardcover 1st edition | April 2014 ISBN 978-178125-0044   Volcanoes are no unusual sight on Iceland and yet the eruption that started June 8, 1783 in the southern district of [...]
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6:54 PM | Book Review: Island on Fire
Island on Fire: The extraordinary story of Laki, the volcano that turned eighteenth-century Europe dark By Witze, A. & Kanipe, J. PROFILE-BOOKS 224 pages | Hardcover 1st edition | April... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:52 PM | How Sensitivity Can Enhance Creativity
“For me, fashion is incredibly emotional. I go to shows in Paris and try not to cry.” Actor Jessica Chastain Qualities such as emotionality and empathy can help highly sensitive people be especially creative. The self-test Are You Highly Sensitive? by Elaine N. Aron, PhD includes the items: “I have a rich, complex inner life” and “I […]
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6:48 PM | Teaching Research Data Management at University of Tennesee Knoxville
Check out the newly published article in the Journal of eScience Librarianship, “Planning Data Management Education Initiatives:  Process, Feedback, and Future Directions.” In the article,  Christopher Eaker, Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee Libraries, discusses a one day …read more
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6:46 PM | A Natural Eye: Delaware official sees science and art in state’s coastline
  Tony Pratt’s career in science began because of a love for the outdoors. And yet, the more he climbed up through management, the less time he spent outside. Pratt runs the Shoreline and Waterway Management section of Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, which oversees regulation of coastal construction, dredging projects and […]
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6:43 PM | More Useless Creatures
Yesterday in the New York Times Sunday Review, Richard Conniff wrote, “[w]ildlife is and should be useless in the same way art, music, poetry and even sports are useless. They are useless in the sense that they do nothing more than raise our spirits, make us laugh or cry, frighten, disturb and delight us.” I couldn’t agree more. In an opinion piece titled “Useless Creatures,” Conniff, a nonfiction writer and student of animals and their behavior, bemoaned the fact […]
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6:42 PM | What it’s Like to SCUBA Dive: Part I
I have returned from a SCUBA diving trip to the Big Island of Hawaii, and I am inspired to share the joy of diving with those that may never learn to dive. PADI, a leading SCUBA diving organization that certifies divers, has certified over 23 million SCUBA divers. That means (assuming most of the certifications […]
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6:41 PM | Wildlife Agency Seeks Educational Use For Crushed Ivory
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking ideas on how to use the crushed remains of illegal ivory it has confiscated and destroyed. The agency wants to use the rubble in a way that increases awareness about the consequences of the illegal trade in ivory.
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6:40 PM | Rosetta scientists choose site for first landing on a comet
Safety and scientific interest had to be balanced.
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6:40 PM | Here's The Gruesome Way A Doctor First Proved The Heart Pumps Blood
Strange as it sounds, European medical doctors didn't know, until the 1600s, that the heart pumps blood around the body. How they proved this seemingly simple fact is one of the most controversial (and gruesome) stories in medicine.Read more...
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6:39 PM | Thought of the Day on how the Public Views Scientists
The comments that are submitted to the NPR pieces on NIH, NIH-funded science and academic careers by Richard Harris (see here, here, here) are interesting. One of the things that is immediately picked up by the typical reader is the conceit we scientists express about having a job paid for by taxpayer funds, that allows […]
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6:39 PM | Robot Frets Over Moral Puzzle, Humans Die
Researchers devise an ethical trap that references Asimov's Laws of Robotics. Continue reading →
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6:35 PM | Before They Were Scientists: Daniel Solomon
Sitting down with Daniel Solomon, dean of the NC State College of Sciences, to talk about his middle school life was certainly a highpoint for the “Before They Were Scientists” series. In this interview Dean Solomon opened up about how his life as a child in the Bronx allowed him to appreciate a diverse learning environment, how he got in trouble trying to escape the island he lived on in Florida, and how his parents’ drive for him to go to medical school shaped so much of his […]
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6:34 PM | New on F1000Research – 15 September 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts. Have you had a chance to check out what our scientists think about Immediate Publication, Transparent Refereeing, No Editorial Bias, and Data Inclusion? Head on over to our homepage and see what others like [...]
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6:28 PM | The science behind swimming
From whales to larvae, study finds common principles at work in swimming. At nearly 100 feet long and weighing as much as 170 tons, the blue whale is the largest creature on the planet, and by far the heaviest living thing ever seen on Earth. So there's no way it could have anything in common with the tiniest fish larvae, which measure millimeters in length and tip the scales at a fraction of a gram, right? Not so fast, says L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor of […]
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6:22 PM | The EU should not ban vacuum cleaners
I’ve been on hols, so allow me to be a little behind the times. The EU is proposing to ban vacuum cleaners of more than 1600 watts. If you follow that link you’ll find a fairish discussion of whether this matters or not: its easy enough to argue that no-one needs more than 1600, and…
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6:21 PM | Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Researchers measure the quantum fluctuations behind a novel magnetic material's ultra-cold ferromagnetic phase transition.
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6:20 PM | Researchers control surface tension to manipulate liquid metals (w/video)
Researchers have developed a technique for controlling the surface tension of liquid metals by applying very low voltages, opening the door to a new generation of reconfigurable electronic circuits, antennas and other technologies.
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6:20 PM | Rare Black-Footed Ferret Babies
Christin Jones joins in on a late-night black-footed ferret tour to ascertain their numbers. In the fight against extinction, every individual counts.
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6:17 PM | Solite Excavation, Day 6
Despite the constant threat of rain, we were able to get into the pit and make some progress along the exposure. Our crew included Ray, Jim, and me, as well as two VT grad students, two professors from Roanoke College … Continue reading →
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6:15 PM | Fast-Running Robot Cheetah Let Off Its Leash
The MIT Cheetah Robot Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT, CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 It bounds just like a rabbit, but it's not quite as cute. Check out the latest iteration of MIT's Cheetah robot. It's just received an algorithm update that allows it to run by itself on grassy terrain: The robot is now able to run, untethered, up to 10 miles per hour on a treadmill indoors, its makers report. It can also jump over short obstacles and continue running. This lab previously showed its Cheetah […]
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6:14 PM | Isn’t Hurting Ourselves Enough?
We alcoholics hurt people. Over and over again. We do terrible things and we victimize people over and over again. We take advantage. We behave boorishly, vilely. And we don’t seem to care about the damage we do. After all, if we cared, why would we keep repeating it? A friend asked me recently why […]
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6:11 PM | Schizophrenia Is Actually Eight Distinct Genetic Disorders
New research published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that schizophrenia is not a single disease, but rather a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each of them with its own set of symptoms. The finding could result in improved diagnosis and treatment, while also shedding light on how genes work together to cause complex disorders.Read more...
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