Posts

January 30, 2015

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4:20 PM | Rarely Seen Saharan Cheetah Revealed in Incredible Photos
It’s not easy to get a glimpse of the critically endangered Saharan cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus hecki), the rarest of the six cheetah subspecies. Only about 200 to 250 of these nocturnal cats are... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:14 PM | A rare glimpse at the elusive Saharan cheetah
Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist […]
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4:13 PM | A magnet falling in a metal tube
by @ulaulaman http://youtu.be/keMpUaoA3Tg about #magnet #school #physics #experiments #magnetic_field Sometimes teach physics, and a couple of years ago the colleague of the educational laboratory proposed to the students a simple experiment: a magnet that descends along a metal tube(1) does not fall at the same speed of the same magnet that we throw from the same height, for example, inside a not metal tube. The magnet inside the metal tube will drop almost as if it remained in suspension, […]
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4:08 PM | Building trustworthy big data algorithms
New algorithm can separate unstructured text into topics with high accuracy and reproducibility Much of our reams of data sit in large databases of unstructured text. Finding insights among emails, […]
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4:07 PM | Altered dopamine signaling a clue to autism
Newly discovered genetic variations linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) disrupt the function of the dopamine transporter, suggesting that altered dopamine signaling contributes to this common developmental condition, according to […]
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4:07 PM | Shared symptoms of Chikungunya virus, rheumatoid arthritis may cloud diagnosis
A mosquito-borne virus that has spread to the Caribbean and Central and South America and has caused isolated infections in Florida often causes joint pain and swelling similar to that […]
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4:06 PM | Why do zebras have stripes?
UCLA study finds that regulating body temperature may be a key factor One of nature’s fascinating questions is how zebras got their stripes. A team of life scientists led by […]
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4:06 PM | So long, Sid
As we get older, one aspect of the festive season becomes increasingly evident, an issue that younger readers may not have considered. It concerns the Christmas cards that do not arrive. Or, alternatively, they do arrive, but with a short note sadly informing us of the demise of a loved one. This year we had […] The post So long, Sid appeared first on physicsfocus.org.
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4:05 PM | Hot on the trail of the hepatitis-liver cancer connection
Using whole genomic sequencing, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have for the first time demonstrated the profound effect that chronic hepatitis infection and inflammation can have on the genetic mutations […]
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4:05 PM | Against the mind/brain by Fred Cummins
Guest post from Fred Cummins in response to a tweet exchange.----------------------------------------This is a letter to Greg Hickok in response to some recent tweet exchanges that immediately seemed to raise issues that are not resolvable in 140 character snippets. I'm including Andrew Wilson and Sabrina Golonka from Leeds, and Marek McGann from Limerick in the distribution, as I believe we might all have interesting perspectives on the issues at stake.Let's start with this heartfelt […]
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4:04 PM | Tweeting about sexism may improve a woman’s wellbeing
Publicly tweeting about sexism could improve a woman’s wellbeing as it has the potential to let them express themselves in ways that feel like they can make a difference. This […]
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4:02 PM | Chili has no beans, a topic with plenty of heat
"The chief ingredients of all chili are fiery envy, scalding jealousy, scorching contempt and sizzling scorn." (H. A. Smith, 1967, Holiday).  Sounds like this guy has participated in a chili cook-off or two. The Texas people of my acquaintance are pretty diverse, but they do agree that beans have no place in chili, let alone adding macaroni or scorn, sorry, corn. What passes for chili in Cincinnati is beneath contempt. To his credit, TPP does not claim to know more about chili […]
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4:01 PM | ‘Vast majority’ of neurosurgeons practice defensive medicine
Extra tests and procedures more likely in state with higher liability risk, reports study in Neurosurgery More than three-fourths US neurosurgeons practice some form of defensive medicine–performing additional tests and […]
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4:00 PM | This Spider Weaves A Web Of Charged Silk
Spider silk is legendarily strong and light. So much so, that researchers are incorporating (or, at least, attempting to incorporate) variations of the material into…
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4:00 PM | DNA clock helps to get measure of people’s lifespans
Scientists have identified a biological clock that provides vital clues about how long a person is likely to live. Researchers studied chemical changes to DNA that take place over a […]
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4:00 PM | New Technique Reverses Aging By Decades In Cultured Human Cells
Scientists from Stanford Medical Center have devised a technique for extending the length of human telomeres. It's a breakthrough that could eventually result in therapies to treat a host of age-related diseases, including heart disease and diabetes. It could also result in longer, healthier lives. Read more...
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3:59 PM | Rosetta, the Comet, and the Science of Surprise
There is a cliche you hear all the time when scientists describe their experiments: "We expect the unexpected," or its jokier cousin, "If we knew what we were doing it wouldn't be called research." (That second one is often, but dubiously, attributed to Albert Einstein.) But like many cliches, this one is built on a foundation of truth--as the comet explorations by the Rosetta spacecraft and Philae lander keep reminding us. The latest shocks come from the huge batch of science results rel
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3:58 PM | Technology Tightens the Focus on Who’s Watching Women
Findings of a new study point to emotional consequences for women who are objectified for their physical appearance. A new analysis is being called the first of its kind to […]
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3:56 PM | Can beer have benefits for people with Parkinson's?
Can beer have benefits for people with Parkinson's? 30 January 2015 We comment on research highlighted this week, that's suggested that drinking beer may have benefits for people with Parkinson's. This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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3:53 PM | Talking to Pluto is hard! Why it takes so long to get data back from New Horizons
As I write this post, New Horizons is nearing the end of a weeklong optical navigation campaign. The last optical navigation images in the weeklong series will be taken tomorrow, but it will likely take two weeks or more for all the data to get to Earth. Two weeks! Why does it take so long?
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3:52 PM | Flashback Friday: An unusual finding during screening colonoscopy: a cockroach!
Giving colonoscopies probably gets boring after a while -- long stretches of intestine, maybe a polyp here or there. So these doctors were probably pretty surprised when they came upon...a cockroach! "How did it get there?", you might be asking (after vomiting a little in your mouth)? Apparently, the patient had a cockroach infestation at home, and the doctors guessed she may have inadvertently eaten one of the creepy crawlies. Whole. Probably best not to think about it too hard. Especially sinc
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3:51 PM | Hubble: The Beginning This segment looks at the state of...
Hubble: The Beginning This segment looks at the state of astronomy before Hubble and the difficulties of observing from the ground that drove the need for a space telescope. Astronomers instrumental in the Hubble project in the 60s and 70s reflect on how the design of the telescope was forced to evolve because methods used by ground-based observatories weren’t practical in space. By: Hubble Space Telescope.
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3:50 PM | Deflategate II
#Deflategate II MRT @woodlandparkzoo: Watch lion triplets go #BeastMode Pumped for #Seahawks #SuperBowl repeat! http://t.co/KytR4v5QHc— russwilliamsiii (@russwilliamsiii) January 30, 2015
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3:47 PM | Birth of a Desert
North Africa once was quite green, From ancient lakes, clues we can glean:
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3:46 PM | EBVM 2014 Conference Presentations
I was fortunate to have the opportunity to speak at an evidence-based veterinary medicine conference organized by RCVS Knowledge in London last October. The recordings of those presentations, and all the others given at the conference, are now available online. … Continue reading →
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3:34 PM | Grading the 2015 version of Pew study of public attitudes toward science
So everybody knows that the Pew Research Center released a cool study yesterday on public attitudes toward science & on differences between public & scientists (or at least AAAS members; it’s worth noting that AAAS membership isn't limited to scientists per se). It was a follow up to Pew’s classic 2009 study of the same -- & it makes just as huge and valuable a contribution to scholarly understanding as that one, in my view. Lots of people have said lots of […]
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3:33 PM | Friday Headlines: 1-30-15
Friday Headlines, January 30, 2015 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Landslide video! Exploding volcano video! Inside the Greenland ice sheet   You must watch this! An amazing new landslide video from Dagestan In the category of “No, … Continue reading →
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3:29 PM | World Science U: Knowledge for Everyone
Whether you are a high school student, science major in college or a lifelong learner, World Science U is where you can explore the wonders of Science guided by leading researchers an… [read] The post World Science U: Knowledge for Everyone appeared first on TUXAR.uk.
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3:21 PM | Sync your sport to your body clock for a personal best
Larks and night owls perform drastically better if a sporting event is timed to suit their circadian rhythm
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3:20 PM | Stunning Supernova Has Bubbly Interior
A new three dimensional model of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant provides insights into how these massive explosions occur.
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