Posts

November 24, 2014

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3:49 PM | Mesozoic Miscellany 69
Newsie BitsThinkGeek, the popular on-line retailer specializing in, appropriately enough, geeky gifts, recently began selling fossils. This resulted in criticism from paleontologists, and eventually ThinkGeek's decision to halt the sales, at least for a time. Lee Hall posted about the controversy at Extinct Los Angeles, following his original post with a ThinkGeek reply, and his subsequent response. At Jersey Boys Hunt Dinosaurs - as well as her blog Shaman of the Atheistic Sciences, Lisa […]
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3:43 PM | This week's C&EN
A short week, still lots of interesting chemistry-related tidbits:I thought this Andrea Widener article about the difficulties that NIH and NSF are having with more grant proposals (and the logistics of sorting through them) was really interesting. Also by Andrea Widener, C&EN's writeup of the DuPont methanethiol accident.Thanks to Carmen Drahl's article, I understand that Google X has hired a variety of chemists to work on nanoparticles towards better medical diagnostics. Pretty […]
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3:30 PM | Tested: The Show — Slow Motion Water Balloon vs. Face Slap
No summary available for this post.
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3:28 PM | Le ‘increspature’ del Big Bang
In questo video, Brian Greene conduce una interessante discussione con alcuni rinomati fisici, del calibro di Alan Guth, Andrei Linde, Paul Steinhardt, Amber Miller e John Kovac, sulle recenti scoperte che riguardano le eventuali “tracce” impresse nella radiazione fossile dall’inflazione cosmica (post), quel periodo di rapida espansione emerso subito dopo il Big Bang e che ha dato forma … Continue reading Le ‘increspature’ del Big Bang →
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3:25 PM | Ep. 356: Rotational Inertia
An object at rest stays at rest, and object in motion tends to stay in motion. This is inertia, defined famously by Isaac Newton in his First Law of Motion. Ep. 356: Rotational Inertia Jump to Shownotes Jump to Transcript Show Notes Sponsors: 8th Light and Swinburne Astronomy Online Astronomy Cast on G+ CosmoAcademy Donate […]
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3:10 PM | iMovie for iOS Tutorial Updated
I recently traveled to France and England and used my iPhone 5s and the iMovie app to create a series of videos about the places I visited. I wanted to test the ease with which I could shoot and edit videos … Continue reading →
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3:10 PM | Learning from Fisheries
Sometimes we tend to forget that all our efforts to build an all-encompassing library of DNA Barcodes generate very valuable byproducts. Probably one equally important legacy is the huge number of DNA extracts and in many cases the associated tissue samples that stored in various places and hopefully available to future generations.Tissue samples today are either preserved in formalin, at temperatures between - 80 and - 90 C, or in liquid nitrogen, at about 193 C. The formalin method works well […]
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3:03 PM | Vegans, Vitamin B12 & Depression, Top 10 Controversial Posts
Staying vegetarian if you have mental or physical health problems might require special dietary planning.
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3:01 PM | Expertise versus consistency
In NIH grant review the standing study section approach to peer review sacrifices specific expertise for the sake of consistency of review. When each person has 10 R01s to review, the odds are that he or she is not the most specifically qualified person for all 10 are high. The process often brings in additional […]
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3:01 PM | Here is What The Brain Can Remember From Infancy (Even When Consciously It’s Gone)
The astounding power of the unconscious to store information we've consciously forgotten. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Your Brain Judges a Face’s Trustworthiness Before You Consciously See It New Study of Improvising Jazz Pianists Shows Similar Brain Circuits Used for Music and Language How The Brain Processes The Emotions Brain Map of Love and Desire […]
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3:00 PM | Beauty Sickness – Do You Have It?
A colleague recently sent me a YouTube video called “An Epidemic of Beauty Sickness.” To be honest, my first thought was, “Ugh. Another useless rant about our cultural addiction to thinness.” But, given that this is the year I decided to embark on a full-scale about-face in how I accept (or don’t) my own body […]
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2:30 PM | Are lawyers ruining science?
Regular Retraction Watch readers may have noticed that legal issues seem to be popping up more often in the cases we cover. There has been a lawsuit filed against PubPeer commenters, for example, and Nature last month blamed lawyers for delayed and opaque retraction notices. It was those cases and others that prompted us to […]
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2:28 PM | Artifacts From the Archives
The Niels Bohr Library and Archive opened its doors last month to show off some of its hidden gems. In addition to its exhaustive book, photographic and oral history collections, the library hosts a repository of a range of old physics documents and artifacts. Much of what it stores are the historical documents of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Physics and some of its member societies. But hidden amongst board meeting minutes and old society declarations are some real […]
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2:25 PM | The Marital Selection Minefield (Part One)
Bringing a prospective boyfriend/girlfriend home to meet your parents is often nerve-wracking. What happens if your parents disapprove of who you've chosen to spend your life with? Or, maybe, even worse, what if your parents try to set you up...            Related StoriesAs Former POWs Grow OlderThe Rise of the Robot TherapistThe Acid Test (Part One of Two) 
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2:20 PM | Black hole jets, how do they work? Magnets!
Well, a really intense magnetic field, at least.
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2:13 PM | Svelare i segreti della materia al Large Hadron Collider
Circa due anni fa, i fisici di LHC che lavorano agli esperimenti ATLAS e CMS annunciarono la scoperta del bosone di Higgs (post). Ma qual è il suo ruolo di “ultimo tassello mancante” del modello standard della fisica delle particelle? Il grande collisore del CERN entrerà in funzione nella primavera del 2015 raddoppiando l’energia di collisione dei … Continue reading Svelare i segreti della materia al Large Hadron Collider →
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2:04 PM | Natural variation in Arabidopsis, the MAGIC way
The research: Finding the causes of variation in seed size and number In the Arabidopsis Research Round-up a few weeks ago, Lisa highlighted a paper from a team at the University of Bath about natural variation in Arabidopsis seeds. Lead author Paula Kover and her team investigated the genetic basis of variation in seed size[...] The post Natural variation in Arabidopsis, the MAGIC way appeared first on Weeding the Gems.
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2:02 PM | New on F1000Research – 24 November 2014
A selection of new content on F1000Research from the past week. To receive notification of all new articles, sign up for our table of contents alerts.   Featured article Late cardiac sodium current can be assessed using automated patch-clamp [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kj] Morgan Chevalier, Bogdan Amuzescu, Vaibhavkumar Gawali, Hannes Todt, Thomas Knott, Olaf [...]
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2:00 PM | Quickies: Brundibar, Terrence Howard and Domestic Violence, and Turning Chickens into Dinosaurs
Categories: QuickiesQ&A With Emily Graslie – “Emily Graslie’s had a pretty big week. On Wednesday, the art-student-turned-star-science-communicator celebrated the release of the 100th episode of her popular YouTube series, “The Brain ...(Read more...)
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1:40 PM | Zombie prions and the fight to slay their diseases
Until recently science thought all infectious diseases in animals and humans were caused by living organisms, namely bacteria, viruses and fungi. In other words, infectious disease was caused by a living entity that contained DNA or at the very least RNA. Hence our treatments for farm animals and humans are designed to kill the offending organism. But you can’t kill that which is not alive. Prions, basically malformed proteins, are not alive by any standard. They lack DNA yet they […]
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1:39 PM | A population of Shantungosaurus, the largest ornithischian
Sadly I have to report that after many years working on various diapsids and having published plenty of papers on dinosaurs generally and theropods specifically, and yes even sauropods, I’ve gone and published two papers on ornithischians. I hang my head in shame, obviously, and I hope too many readers won’t think too little of […]
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1:10 PM | How to handle life adversities? Coping mechanisms
Maybe I am on a nostalgic trip but for whatever reason I have been reminiscing about my life and immediate family for the past few weeks. In a certain sense […]
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12:49 PM | Run Run Run Run.
I ran the Philadelphia half marathon yesterday with BB, and we set our new personal record.  A little less than two hours and fifteen minutes. Not shabby for 13.1 miles, on a course which had a couple of pretty decent hills. And for having a strain in my lower abs or groin (not sure which, […]
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12:25 PM | Activating the backchannel
Using technology to enable active engagement with content in a large lecture. I have recently presented the paper “Enabling backchannel communication between a lecturer and a large group” at the SEFI 2014 conference in Birmingham. That paper is based on work … Continue reading →
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12:23 PM | The Humanities Are Ruining Neuroscience
Photo illustration by Andrea Levy for The Chronicle ReviewInflammatory title, isn't it. Puzzled by how it could possibly happen? Then read on!A few days ago, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a piece called Neuroscience Is Ruining the Humanities. You can find it in a Google search and at reddit, among other places. The url is http://chronicle.com/article/Neuroscience-Is-Ruining-the/150141/ {notice the “Neuroscience-Is-Ruining” part.}Oh wait. Here's a tweet.Neuroscience Is […]
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12:00 PM | Things I Don’t Know…
… about spiders. Many months ago, the kind people over at Things We Don’t Know asked me to write a guest blog post for them. Due to unforeseen circumstances and being very busy on my internship, I unfortunately haven’t been able … Continue reading →
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11:30 AM | How we do science communication: survey results
by Lisa Willemse & Catherine Anderson Communication, Education, and Outreach subject editors In our last editorial, we discussed a report by the Council of Canadian Academies that labeled science culture as “underdeveloped” in English Canada. This gap appears to be rich in opportunity for Canadian science bloggers and other creators of science communications. But those of us who do this sort of work know that it’s not quite as simple as penning a few words or taking a few […]
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10:57 AM | Distraction effects
I’ve been puzzling over this tweet from Jeff Rouder: Surely, I thought, psychology is built out of effects. What could be wrong with focussing on testing which ones are reliable? But I think I’ve got it now. The thing about effects is that they show you – an experimental psychologist – can construct a situation […]
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10:18 AM | What day of the week do you weigh the most?
Monday. According to a recent study by Orsama and colleagues, that’s the day when most people experience their maximum body weight. And your lowest body weight? That’s most likely to be recorded on Friday. The weekend certainly seems to play … Continue reading »
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10:15 AM | Helicobacter pylori and stem cells in the gastric crypt
Last Friday, the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop finished here at Moffitt. The event drew a variety of internal and external participants — you can see a blurry photo of many of them above — and was structured as a competition between four teams specializing in four different domains: Microbiome, Hepatitis C, Human papillomavirus, and […]

Houghton, J., Stoicov, C., Nomura, S., Rogers, A.B., Carlson, J., Li, H., Cai, X., Fox, J.G., Goldenring, J.R. & Wang, T.C. & (2004). Gastric cancer originating from bone marrow-derived cells., Science, 306 (5701) 1568-71. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15567866

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