Posts

September 17, 2014

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10:09 AM | Anorexia and I Shake Hands | poetry
Anorexia and I Shake Hands   I woke up dead that morning. Skin peeling in strips like wet paper, spider clumps of hair strewn throughout my bed. I felt my bones crumble like antacids, my organs turning to pulp. A mind careening toward a blank wall.   I woke up dead that morning. The post Anorexia and I Shake Hands | poetry appeared first on HeadStuff.
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10:03 AM | Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight
A Japanese woman with macular degeneration is the first person to be treated with induced pluripotent stem cells, made from her own skin
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10:00 AM | 'Vomit comet' study could lead to better space suit design
Researchers calculate when humans break from a walk to a run in lunar gravity
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10:00 AM | Peacocks need not sacrifice flying skills for sexiness
Decorative tail feathers don't hinder speedy takeoffs
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10:00 AM | Ce Soir: Paris Machine Learning Meetup #1, Season 2, A New Beginning (Snips, Nomo, Clustaar and more)
Once again with Franck, we have decided to do a second season of the pretty successul season 1 of the Paris Machine Learning Meetup. We have about 1200 members and growing. The twitter hashtag for tonight's meetup is #MLParis. The YouTube page is here, while the Google Hangout Event page is here.Paris Machine Learning resources other than ones on Meetup.com include the LinkedIn group, Google+ group and the Archives of meetup.A big thank you to DojoEvents for hosting us. Here is the […]
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9:59 AM | Using liquid inks to create better solar cells
Solar cell film made from kesterite or perovskite absorbs energy more efficiently and is cheaper to manufacture.
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9:59 AM | La transformación del fotomatón
La transformación del fotomatón es un caso particular de transformación biyectiva de imágenes. La introdujeron en 1997 los matemáticos Jean-Paul Delahaye y Philippe Mathieu (ver [1]). Una transformación biyectiva de una imagen de n por m píxeles, es una modificación de esta imagen sobre sí misma: cada pixel se desplaza de su lugar a otro –y el que ocupa […] Seguir leyendo The post La transformación del […]
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9:54 AM | Twisted graphene chills out
When two sheets of graphene are stacked in a special way, it is possible to cool down the graphene with a laser instead of heating it up, researchers have shown.
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9:46 AM | They can fuck you up, your mum and dad.
They fuck you up, your mum and dad.     They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you with the faults they had     And add some extra, just for you. Phillip Larkin – This Be The Verse Looking back on my own childhood it is easier now to observe the fertile ground […]
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9:34 AM | Wednesday Poem
With a Pen A child will come to understand the meaning in their name A tribe will retrace their pathway to the beginning of their totem A people might preserve their culture for tomorrow’s generations A simple prophecy in graffiti...
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9:28 AM | Una milza artificiale per depurare il sangue
Le infezioni sanguigne possono rivelarsi estremamente difficili da curare, e possono degenerare nella setticemia, la risposta dell'organismo all'invasione da parte di microrganismi patogeni, spesso fatale. In più del 50% dei casi, i medici non riescono a diagnosticare le cause dell'infezione che ha provocato la setticemia, e sono costretti a ricorrere ad antibiotici a largo spettro che mirano ad eliminare diversi tipi di batteri. Questo approccio, tuttavia, non ha sempre l'effetto […]
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9:27 AM | Beard growing challenge to raise money for prostate cancer
OctoBeardFest follows huge success of Movember
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9:27 AM | John Ellis On The Ascent Of The Standard Model
Being at CERN for a couple of weeks, I could not refrain from following yesterday's talks in the Main Auditorium, which celebrated the 90th birthday of Herwig Schopper, who directed CERN in the crucial years of the LEP construction.A talk I found most enjoyable was John Ellis'. He gave an overview of the historical context preceding the decision to build LEP, and then a summary of the incredible bounty of knowledge that the machine produced in the 1990s.read more
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9:06 AM | Toward optical chips with MoS2 light emitters
A promising light source for optoelectronic chips can be tuned to different frequencies.
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9:00 AM | Recruiting bacteria to be technology innovation partners
For most people biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in a streambed and dirty drains. While there are plenty of 'bad' biofilms around, researchers see biofilms as a robust new platform for designer nanomaterials that could clean up polluted rivers, manufacture pharmaceutical products, fabricate new textiles, and more.
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9:00 AM | A virologist in the hot zone
Ebola scientist Heinz Feldmann tested blood samples at a Liberian treatment center
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9:00 AM | The latest on gluten and IBS
To follow up on "A balanced look at gluten sensitivity" that was posted on Science-Based Medicine in August, we look at the latest results presented on the role of gluten and FODMAPs in IBS. Are IBS sufferers really the best place to look for evidence of gluten sensitivity?
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9:00 AM | Antibiotic resistance: Move the money (and control it)!
The BBC Radio4 program Discovery had a two-part series (August 18 and 25th) on the real health danger that we face and the research challenge it presents.  No, not Big Data mapping of diabetes or cancer, or athletic ability or intelligence.  Instead, they were about an impending biomedical disaster, one that essentially trivializes much of which we are throwing away resources on: antibiotic resistance. Growing antibiotic resistance seems to be imminent or at least inevitable, […]
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8:52 AM | Scientists determine factors that give tubes their chiral angles
Researchers have come up with the seed of a simple formula that describes why nanotubes have chirality.
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8:46 AM | Each tree species has unique bacterial identity, microbiome research shows
Each tree species has its own bacterial identity. That’s the conclusion of researchers who studied the genetic fingerprints of bacteria on 57 species of trees growing on a Panamanian island. “This study demonstrates for the first time that host plants from different plant families and with different ecological strategies possess very different microbial communities on … Continue reading →
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8:43 AM | There's a problem with assuming the most intelligent candidates make the best employees
Workplace research through the 20th Century suggested that selecting for intelligence is the best way to identify good performers. General mental ability (GMA), a popular recruitment measure that maps closely to the colloquial meaning of "intelligence", is strongly correlated with on-the job performance, well ahead of any other single measure.This consistent finding came from studies that mostly defined job performance as carrying out the duties expected in that role. Although intuitive, this […]
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8:42 AM | Dans la tête à Thévenoud, un problème au cerveau?
A quarante ans, ne jamais avoir déclaré ses revenus ni payé son loyer, c'est désormais possible. Thomas Thévenoud l'a prouvé. Rien ne sera plus comme avant. Recalés, tous les cabinets d'optimisation fiscale. Ridiculisés, les habiles conseillers en patrimoine. Thévenoud révolutionne l'art de la fraude. Avec lui il n'y a qu'un seul mot d'ordre : ne rien dire. Le fantôme du fisc, c'est lui. Pour se rafraîchir la […]
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8:40 AM | 219 million stars: Astronomers release most detailed catalog ever made of the visible Milky Way
A new catalog of the visible part of the northern part of our home Galaxy, the Milky Way, includes no fewer than 219 million stars. From dark sky sites on Earth, the Milky Way appears as a glowing band stretching across the sky. To astronomers, it is the disk of our own galaxy, a system … Continue reading →
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8:33 AM | Congress Astrobiology Symposium at NASA/Library
Nel corso di questi anni, l’astrobiologia ci ha rivelato tante scoperte sia sul nostro pianeta che in generale sul Sistema Solare. Oggi sappiamo che esistono organismi viventi che prosperano in ambienti difficili qui sulla Terra rispetto a quanto potevamo immaginare in precedenza. Non solo, ma la biodiversità dei microorganismi e le forme di vita estremofile sono numerosi […]
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8:27 AM | The Art of the Nobel Prizes
As Nobel Week 2014 is approaching Linda Moussakova shares an overview of the various art projects related to the Nobel Prizes. « inuentas aut qui uitam excoluere per artes » « inventions enhance life which is beautified through art » The Aeneid  Book VI verse 663 available on classics.mit.edu This extract from The Aeneid was engraved […]
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8:27 AM | Trattamenti di fine vita, a che punto siamo?
Una leggenda racconta che sull'isola di Delo non si poteva né nascere né morire. Una decisione della dea Atene stabilì che l'isola non sarebbe mai stata abitata da esseri umani: alle donne era vietato partorire sull'isola sacra e i defunti venivano trasportati nella vicina isola di Rinia. Fuori dal mito l'Italia sembra essere una moderna isola di Delo, almeno per quanto riguarda le decisioni in tema di fine vita. A dimostrare lo stato di limbo in cui giace il nostro Paese […]
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8:18 AM | How To Spot the International Space Station
Many people have a difficult time comprehending the massive proportions of the International Space Station (ISS). Weighing almost one million pounds, and filling the footprint of a football field, it is by far the largest man-made object in space. The ship has an acre of reflective solar arrays that provide power for the crew and also help make the ISS the third brightest object in the night sky (behind the Moon and Venus). It is easily viewed with the naked eye. You just need to know where to […]
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8:17 AM | Not Every Afghan Institution Is Efficient; This One Is
When NPR's Kabul bureau caught fire recently, it came as a pleasant surprise that the fire department in the Afghan capital is good at putting out fires.
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8:16 AM | When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On
With the price of solar panels falling, more municipalities and homeowners are installing them. But having solar panels doesn't mean you won't lose power in a blackout — at least not yet.
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8:14 AM | Impact that doomed the dinosaurs helped the forests bloom
Some 66 million years ago, a 10-km diameter chunk of rock hit the Yucatan peninsula with the force of 100 teratons of TNT. It left a crater more than 150 km across, and the resulting megatsunami, wildfires, global earthquakes and volcanism are widely accepted to have wiped out the dinosaurs and made way for the … Continue reading →
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